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 1 
 on: April 23, 2019, 02:24:31 PM 
Started by JoeC - Last post by doctordoowop
Cant explain why-but  lost all interest  in hockey.  But  much more in baseball.

 2 
 on: April 23, 2019, 02:00:00 PM 
Started by JoeC - Last post by JoeC
Two first-round Game 7's coming up. Tonight, Leafs-Bruins. Tomorrow, Capitals-Hurricanes.

Kuznetsov has totally disappeared for the Caps. Playing with no spark or determination. Just written off as his being a "moody" player. I put it down more to his signing a $52 million contract taking him through 2025. TJ Oshie, whose presence is sorely missed due to his broken clavicle, makes 25% less.

 3 
 on: April 21, 2019, 02:12:38 PM 
Started by doctordoowop - Last post by doctordoowop
mike-right. Gives   MLB  Tv  &  ESPN  something to say.

Harold  Reynolds  lost his mind--used  Votto's  pop  up  stats as ammo  for being in the HOF.

 4 
 on: April 21, 2019, 12:52:04 PM 
Started by doctordoowop - Last post by bklynmike101
Then again, Oakland slugger Khris Davis, who batted exactly .247 in each of the past three seasons, had a batting average of exactly-------------------.247 this season as of Friday night.

Today's paper states Votto has never popped out to the catcher in his big league career, and strangely has a career popup rate of about 10% of the norm.  Grin 

 5 
 on: April 21, 2019, 12:45:42 PM 
Started by doctordoowop - Last post by doctordoowop
Joey  Votto  just  popped   out  to  1st base--1st time ever in  6827   at bats.   Who cares?

 6 
 on: April 21, 2019, 07:31:06 AM 
Started by JoeC - Last post by JoeC
Correct!  Howell is right.  Ha! Ha!  A junkball pitcher today would have to have REALLY GOOD JUNK, like Sandy Koufax's joke "Ephus Pitch".    I just finished watching the end of a super NHL layoff series.  Blues played a perfect game against The Jets.  They are my two favourite teams.  My Hometown team (which didn't exist when I lived there). and one of the two main teams, for whom a good friend of mine played.  I'm very happy The Blues are moving on, but sad The Jets are going home, and Calgary is just about out, too.  It's a crime that The Canadian teams can't really compete for The Stanley Cup.  Winnipeg was our best hope.  Now there's only Toronto.  
I knew you would be conflicted, having been a Blues fan going back a long way.

Watched the Caps-Carolina Game 5. Carolina dropped all the defensive principles they had practiced so well in Games 3 and 4 at home. Got into an open skating game which played into the Caps hands. 6-0 final. Wondered why Brind'Amour left Mrazek in goal after the game got totally out of hand??

 7 
 on: April 20, 2019, 09:30:00 PM 
Started by JoeC - Last post by Robb_K
Correct!  Howell is right.  Ha! Ha!  A junkball pitcher today would have to have REALLY GOOD JUNK, like Sandy Koufax's joke "Ephus Pitch".    I just finished watching the end of a super NHL layoff series.  Blues played a perfect game against The Jets.  They are my two favourite teams.  My Hometown team (which didn't exist when I lived there). and one of the two main teams, for whom a good friend of mine played.  I'm very happy The Blues are moving on, but sad The Jets are going home, and Calgary is just about out, too.  It's a crime that The Canadian teams can't really compete for The Stanley Cup.  Winnipeg was our best hope.  Now there's only Toronto.  

 8 
 on: April 20, 2019, 09:27:25 PM 
Started by JoeC - Last post by Robb_K

My bad for not being more clear. My questions about the age of the pitcher and who he had been with, tenure with Sox, etc. were meant for the relief pitcher I'm struggling to name. Not Harry Dorish. BTW, no "c" in Dorish's name, at least not on his baseball cards!

The other reliever who did only relieving was 35 years old.  He had been with the Redlegs in 1949, then languished in the minors until 1955, when, as a rookie, he lead the team in saves and had an excellent 8-3 season with a good 2.93 ERA.  He was a junkball pitcher with very few strikeouts.  He was only with The Sox basically 1955-57, with '56 and '57 much less effective and maybe being their 3rd or even 4th reliever.  He started with them in 1958, but only pitched 2 innings in one game.  Then, his major league career was over.  He had a well-known nickname.  You'll remember him.  I had his card every year from 1949-1959, even though he stayed in the minors some of those years. All his years in the minors with The Reds/Redlegs between 1950 and 1955 when he came back to the majors with The White Sox, he played with The Reds/Redlegs in the preseason, and he had a Topps card, and for most of them, he had a Bowman card, and for the later ones, I believe he had a Fleer card, as well.

That info helped a lot. Before naming him, though, gotta say I think the reason I had this amount of trouble is a testament to just how good White Sox starting pitching was in the mid and late 1950s. Those starting staffs were exceptional! The nickname tip, along with the odd career he had (I mean, a pitcher getting his big break at 35), brought me to Dixie Howell. Can you imagine a junk ball pitcher being a closer today, when most 9th inning specialists have a fastball in the high 90s.  


 9 
 on: April 20, 2019, 08:42:16 PM 
Started by JoeC - Last post by JoeC
[quote author=Robb_K link=topic=7918.msg82782#msg82782 date=1555777083

Harry Dorisch was 33 in 1955.  His best years were with The White Sox from 1951 through 1954.  He was mainly a reliever, but always started a handful of games each year with them.  He was half starter, half Reliever with The Browns in 1950.  He was about half and half with The Red Sox from 1947-49.  He was traded to The Orioles in late spring 1955, and was one of their main relievers.  In mid 1956, The O's traded him back to Boston, where he hardly played.  That was his last season.  He was a control pitcher, who only struck out about one batter for every 3 innings,  He walked slightly less than one batter per 3 innings, and allowed one hit per inning.  He had a career ERA of 3.83.  he led The AL in saves in 1952, with 11.  In those days, their were only a handful of full-time relievers.

My bad for not being more clear. My questions about the age of the pitcher and who he had been with, tenure with Sox, etc. were meant for the relief pitcher I'm struggling to name. Not Harry Dorish. BTW, no "c" in Dorish's name, at least not on his baseball cards!

The other reliever who did only relieving was 35 years old.  He had been with the Redlegs in 1949, then languished in the minors until 1955, when, as a rookie, he lead the team in saves and had an excellent 8-3 season with a good 2.93 ERA.  He was a junkball pitcher with very few strikeouts.  He was only with The Sox basically 1955-57, with '56 and '57 much less effective and maybe being their 3rd or even 4th reliever.  He started with them in 1958, but only pitched 2 innings in one game.  Then, his major league career was over.  He had a well-known nickname.  You'll remember him.  I had his card every year from 1949-1959, even though he stayed in the minors some of those years. All his years in the minors with The Reds/Redlegs between 1950 and 1955 when he came back to the majors with The White Sox, he played with The Reds/Redlegs in the preseason, and he had a Topps card, and for most of them, he had a Bowman card, and for the later ones, I believe he had a Fleer card, as well.

That info helped a lot. Before naming him, though, gotta say I think the reason I had this amount of trouble is a testament to just how good White Sox starting pitching was in the mid and late 1950s. Those starting staffs were exceptional! The nickname tip, along with the odd career he had (I mean, a pitcher getting his big break at 35), brought me to Dixie Howell. Can you imagine a junk ball pitcher being a closer today, when most 9th inning specialists have a fastball in the high 90s.  

 10 
 on: April 20, 2019, 07:28:03 PM 
Started by JoeC - Last post by Robb_K
[quote author=Robb_K link=topic=7918.msg82782#msg82782 date=1555777083

Harry Dorisch was 33 in 1955.  His best years were with The White Sox from 1951 through 1954.  He was mainly a reliever, but always started a handful of games each year with them.  He was half starter, half Reliever with The Browns in 1950.  He was about half and half with The Red Sox from 1947-49.  He was traded to The Orioles in late spring 1955, and was one of their main relievers.  In mid 1956, The O's traded him back to Boston, where he hardly played.  That was his last season.  He was a control pitcher, who only struck out about one batter for every 3 innings,  He walked slightly less than one batter per 3 innings, and allowed one hit per inning.  He had a career ERA of 3.83.  he led The AL in saves in 1952, with 11.  In those days, their were only a handful of full-time relievers.

My bad for not being more clear. My questions about the age of the pitcher and who he had been with, tenure with Sox, etc. were meant for the relief pitcher I'm struggling to name. Not Harry Dorish. BTW, no "c" in Dorish's name, at least not on his baseball cards!
[/quote]

The other reliever who did only relieving was 35 years old.  He had been with the Redlegs in 1949, then languished in the minors until 1955, when, as a rookie, he lead the team in saves and had an excellent 8-3 season with a good 2.93 ERA.  He was a junkball pitcher with very few strikeouts.  He was only with The Sox basically 1955-57, with '56 and '57 much less effective and maybe being their 3rd or even 4th reliever.  He started with them in 1958, but only pitched 2 innings in one game.  Then, his major league career was over.  He had a well-known nickname.  You'll remember him.  I had his card every year from 1949-1959, even though he stayed in the minors some of those years. All his years in the minors with The Reds/Redlegs between 1950 and 1955 when he came back to the majors with The White Sox, he played with The Reds/Redlegs in the preseason, and he had a Topps card, and for most of them, he had a Bowman card, and for the later ones, I believe he had a Fleer card, as well.

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