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 1 
 on: December 17, 2017, 11:41:32 PM 
Started by Robb_K - Last post by doctordoowop
Baseball is stat crazy--but  can anyone  compare  with  JoeD's 379  HRs  career &  369  K's.(I think the numbers  are right)   Just incredible. 

BTW  Joe--LA is up to something big.  That crazy salary  dump to  Atl  &  I guarantee u  Darvish is gone.  Has there ever been  a bigger choke in WS?   Now some are claiming he was tipping his pitches.


See the  medical  leak that  Ohtani  has torn elbow ligament?

 2 
 on: December 17, 2017, 10:01:07 PM 
Started by Robb_K - Last post by Robb_K
Fox, choking way up on that heavy bat of his, stuck out a little more than 200 times in over 10,500 plate appearances. If one of the NYY aces of the 1950s pitched a 3 or 4 hitter against the ChiSox, you also didn't need to look at the box score to know that Fox had two of the hits.

I'll bet you all didn't know that Fox was discovered by Connie Mack's  crew, and first played for the Philadelphia Athletics, before The White Sox.  In 1949,The A's traded Fox to Chicago straight up, for catcher, Joe Tipton.  Unbelievably, no cash was involved.  It wasn't like Mack's sell-off of decent players to raise operating cash.  The A's were relatively competitive from 1947-49, and even had been a pennant contender in 1948. It was a trade they'd regret.

 3 
 on: December 17, 2017, 06:01:45 PM 
Started by Robb_K - Last post by JoeC
Fox, choking way up on that heavy bat of his, stuck out a little more than 200 times in over 10,500 plate appearances. If one of the NYY aces of the 1950s pitched a 3 or 4 hitter against the ChiSox, you also didn't need to look at the box score to know that Fox had two of the hits.

 4 
 on: December 17, 2017, 12:02:33 PM 
Started by Robb_K - Last post by doctordoowop
A typical Judge game--HR,  BB, &  K. Grin Grin Grin Grin


 5 
 on: December 17, 2017, 10:42:43 AM 
Started by Robb_K - Last post by bklynmike101
Agree with all 'youse' guys. The magic number for a "heavy hitter" with high strikeouts was 100k's/season in the days of Mantle/Colavito/Killebrew et al. Now, most every full-time player whiffs 100+ times/season. Worse still, after the strikeout, they calmly go back tot he bench as though it's all just routine. It's one thing if a guy hitting 30-40 HRs and batting .275 (or more) whiffs 100 times. But it's absurd when a guy with 10 HRs batting .235 strikes our 125-150 times as though it was nothing. Locally, Luis Valbuena and (last year) Danny Espinosa come to mind. And in bunt situations, move the runner over situations, etc., they still go for the fences (with meager results).

Nellie Fox was a scrapper. Very few around these days (if any) 

 6 
 on: December 17, 2017, 09:21:10 AM 
Started by Robb_K - Last post by JoeC
Squeeze play??? I'd settle these days for players (not just talking NL pitchers) being able to get a sacrifice bunt down. A lost art.

Back in the mid-50s when I was fortunate enough to see many Yankees' home games, Mickey Mantle struck out a lot -- at least for that era. The Yankee Stadium crowd, despite his being the great player he was, used to get on him pretty good with boos. (Of course, they's love him again when he homered later in the game.) Nowadays, the big stars no longer hear many boos for striking out. It's accepted in a game when a team may strikeout 10 or 12 times. If you're a pitcher now, and don't average at least a strikeout per inning pitched, you're a junk baller.

 7 
 on: December 16, 2017, 10:20:27 PM 
Started by Robb_K - Last post by doctordoowop
Wen  did  u last  see a squeeze  play,   or better yet  steal  of home?

PItching with 2 days rest  as Koufax  did  in 65, and Gibson in 67-68?

 8 
 on: December 16, 2017, 07:36:47 PM 
Started by Robb_K - Last post by Robb_K
Some memorabilia is timeless and even increases in, value. Only 2 points I'd make are: (1) there are very few pieces in true Mint or Excellent graded condition (why they are so valuable); and (2) when people quote a price, you still have to find a buyer willing to pay it. Sometimes that is easier said than done (to quote The Essex). 'Investors" only want the top quality stuff. The folks who will buy average or poor quality out of emotional connection to their youth are the ones becoming scarcer.

Joe,
I guess that means I'm becoming scarcer. Sad but true. I've always (foolishly) preferred my Valmy Thomas and Bob Oldis cards over my Mantle & Mays cards.
I'm with you, Mike. I loved baseball in the glory days of the 50s with only 16 teams, no free agency and a World Series that was over by mid-October. Also, a time when contact hitting (le.g., Nellie Fox) was appreciated. Can't stand all the K's today, especially from non-power hitters.
I agree.  I hate all the strikeouts and swinging for the fences.  I, too, like contact hitting and lusty batting averages.  I remember when Ted Williams hit .388.

 9 
 on: December 16, 2017, 06:44:58 PM 
Started by Robb_K - Last post by JoeC
Don't disagree Mike.

Some memorabilia is timeless and retains, or even increases in, value. Only two points I'd make are: (1) there are very few pieces in true Mint or Excellent graded condition (why they are so valuable); and (2) when people quote a price, you still have to find a buyer willing to pay it. Sometimes that is easier said than done (to quote The Essex). 'Investors" only want the top quality stuff. The folks who will buy average or poor quality out of emotional connection to their youth are the ones becoming scarcer.



Joe,

I guess that means I'm becoming scarcer. Sad but true. I've always (foolishly) preferred my Valmy Thomas and Bob Oldis cards over my Mantle & Mays cards.

I'm with you, Mike. I loved baseball in the glory days of the 50s with only 16 teams, no free agency and a World Series that was over by mid-October. Also, a time when contact hitting (le.g., Nellie Fox) was appreciated. Can't stand all the K's today, especially from non-power hitters.

 10 
 on: December 16, 2017, 05:42:01 PM 
Started by Robb_K - Last post by Robb_K
Don't disagree Mike.

Some memorabilia is timeless and retains, or even increases in, value. Only two points I'd make are: (1) there are very few pieces in true Mint or Excellent graded condition (why they are so valuable); and (2) when people quote a price, you still have to find a buyer willing to pay it. Sometimes that is easier said than done (to quote The Essex). 'Investors" only want the top quality stuff. The folks who will buy average or poor quality out of emotional connection to their youth are the ones becoming scarcer.



Joe,

I guess that means I'm becoming scarcer. Sad but true. I've always (foolishly) preferred my Valmy Thomas and Bob Oldis cards over my Mantle & Mays cards.

Yes, sadly, after our generation dies off, only a few handsful of history buffs will be bidding on our records and Baseball memorobelia. 

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