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 21 
 on: June 08, 2018, 07:29:01 PM 
Started by Robb_K - Last post by doctordoowop
Robb--hockey  teams  move  around almost as much  as players.   

In  BB--Braves to   Milwaukee, Browns  to  Baltimore,  A's to Oakland,   Wash to  Minn.   (& Texas).   Very  little  compared to  hockey.  Am I missing  any?

Oh--Dodgers &  Giants!

 22 
 on: June 08, 2018, 12:32:35 PM 
Started by Robb_K - Last post by JoeC
Well, looks like Vegas ran out of gas. Caps too big and physical for the GK.

I love how all the questions to the Caps players are about "What's different about THIS particular team (from the Caps teams who were eliminated in past seasons")? True answer is that several of those Caps teams from the past were better, maybe ALOT better talent-wise but ... the past opponents on the way to the Stanley Cup were FAR more formidable. 

 23 
 on: June 06, 2018, 08:03:46 AM 
Started by Robb_K - Last post by JoeC
So, Robb, with Milt Schmidt and Sid Abel as the GMs of the expansion teams, you had the Kraut Line vs the Production Line. Both centered their respective lines, didn't they? I never saw either play as they both retired around the time I saw my first hockey at the old Madison Square Garden in the mid-50s.

When Milt was the Caps first GM, he was always wanting to talk about his beloved Bruins and the hard times he experienced growing up in Kitchener. Always had a big smile and was a good choice, not so much in evaluating or developing talent on the Caps, but in being sort of the "ambassador" that "introduced" the game to the people of Washington. Maybe why the Caps survived when the Scouts did not was that many in  in DC had come from places like NY, Boston, Chicago and Detroit.

Yes, both played centre.  I saw them both play at the tail end of their careers.  Kansas City is just not (and will never be) a hockey town.  The people there are just not interested in that game.  It is a baseball and football town.  They've had a terrific arena there for several years now, but no serious efforts to get an NHL. team there.  They couldn't even support an AHL team.  They could have Wayne Gretzky be the owner and GM there, and not succeed.  Washington probably has enough people working in Federal jobs who originated in hockey country.

At least enough to help. In the first 20 years, the crowd - such as it was - always seemed to be 50-50. With the Flyers, it was often 80-20 Philly fans (short drive). Think the Caps even placed ads in the Philly papers advertising upcoming games. Flyers were at their peak back then and tix in Philly were hard to come by. Their money was green too.

 24 
 on: June 06, 2018, 02:05:46 AM 
Started by Robb_K - Last post by Robb_K
So, Robb, with Milt Schmidt and Sid Abel as the GMs of the expansion teams, you had the Kraut Line vs the Production Line. Both centered their respective lines, didn't they? I never saw either play as they both retired around the time I saw my first hockey at the old Madison Square Garden in the mid-50s.

When Milt was the Caps first GM, he was always wanting to talk about his beloved Bruins and the hard times he experienced growing up in Kitchener. Always had a big smile and was a good choice, not so much in evaluating or developing talent on the Caps, but in being sort of the "ambassador" that "introduced" the game to the people of Washington. Maybe why the Caps survived when the Scouts did not was that many in  in DC had come from places like NY, Boston, Chicago and Detroit.

Yes, both played centre.  I saw them both play at the tail end of their careers.  Kansas City is just not (and will never be) a hockey town.  The people there are just not interested in that game.  It is a baseball and football town.  They've had a terrific arena there for several years now, but no serious efforts to get an NHL. team there.  They couldn't even support an AHL team.  They could have Wayne Gretzky be the owner and GM there, and not succeed.  Washington probably has enough people working in Federal jobs who originated in hockey country.

 25 
 on: June 05, 2018, 07:31:43 PM 
Started by Robb_K - Last post by JoeC
So, Robb, with Milt Schmidt and Sid Abel as the GMs of the expansion teams, you had the Kraut Line vs the Production Line. Both centered their respective lines, didn't they? I never saw either play as they both retired around the time I saw my first hockey at the old Madison Square Garden in the mid-50s.

When Milt was the Caps first GM, he was always wanting to talk about his beloved Bruins and the hard times he experienced growing up in Kitchener. Always had a big smile and was a good choice, not so much in evaluating or developing talent on the Caps, but in being sort of the "ambassador" that "introduced" the game to the people of Washington. Maybe why the Caps survived when the Scouts did not was that many in  in DC had come from places like NY, Boston, Chicago and Detroit.

 26 
 on: June 05, 2018, 05:32:19 PM 
Started by Robb_K - Last post by Robb_K
Mike, you musta loved the early 70s Redskins when George Allen brought in all his old LA Rams players (like Myron Pottios, Jack Pardee, Maxie Baughan, Diron Talbert, etc)  -- all of whom were in their 30s, several mid to late 30s. But ... he turned a very bad organization around quickly! The "Over The Hill Gang."

The St. Louis Blues did it right, from the get-go and were rewarded. When the Caps and Kansas City Scouts joined the NHL 5 or so years later, the Scouts took older guys, the Caps all youth. Didn't work out for either new franchise. They were both dreadful, for years

Trivia question: Where did the Scouts relocate to? I don't know the answer as I type the question.
They became The New Jersey Devils.
How about that. I would've guessed the Colorado Avalanche or some West Coast franchise.

Do you recall the GM that was in charge of building the KC franchise? In the case of the Caps, it was long-time Bruin great Milt Schmidt, of Kraut Line fame. He chose 20 year old Greg Joly as the Caps #1 pick (the #1 pick in the entire 1974 draft). A total bust from the Regina Pats -- an offensive defenseman, whose offense in the NHL never materialized. Clue on the Scouts GM question: another HoF player. Seems like many GMs back in the day were HoFers. A lot more than today.
The Scouts' first GM was Sid Abel, who, later became GM of The Blues.  Sorry, I forgot to mention that The Scouts moved to Colorado for a few years before moving to New Jersey.  The were called The Colorado Rockies.  So, you remembered correctly that they moved to Denver.  The Avalanche were relocated there from Quebec, when The Canadian Dollar was at its weakest, and Winnipeg also moved to Phoenix.  New Jets were relocated from Atlanta (Thrashers), who never got any followers.

 27 
 on: June 05, 2018, 04:38:23 PM 
Started by Robb_K - Last post by JoeC
Mike, you musta loved the early 70s Redskins when George Allen brought in all his old LA Rams players (like Myron Pottios, Jack Pardee, Maxie Baughan, Diron Talbert, etc)  -- all of whom were in their 30s, several mid to late 30s. But ... he turned a very bad organization around quickly! The "Over The Hill Gang."

The St. Louis Blues did it right, from the get-go and were rewarded. When the Caps and Kansas City Scouts joined the NHL 5 or so years later, the Scouts took older guys, the Caps all youth. Didn't work out for either new franchise. They were both dreadful, for years

Trivia question: Where did the Scouts relocate to? I don't know the answer as I type the question.
They became The New Jersey Devils.
How about that. I would've guessed the Colorado Avalanche or some West Coast franchise.

Do you recall the GM that was in charge of building the KC franchise? In the case of the Caps, it was long-time Bruin great Milt Schmidt, of Kraut Line fame. He chose 20 year old Greg Joly as the Caps #1 pick (the #1 pick in the entire 1974 draft). A total bust from the Regina Pats -- an offensive defenseman, whose offense in the NHL never materialized. Clue on the Scouts GM question: another HoF player. Seems like many GMs back in the day were HoFers. A lot more than today.

 28 
 on: June 05, 2018, 01:32:31 PM 
Started by Robb_K - Last post by Robb_K
Mike, you musta loved the early 70s Redskins when George Allen brought in all his old LA Rams players (like Myron Pottios, Jack Pardee, Maxie Baughan, Diron Talbert, etc)  -- all of whom were in their 30s, several mid to late 30s. But ... he turned a very bad organization around quickly! The "Over The Hill Gang."

The St. Louis Blues did it right, from the get-go and were rewarded. When the Caps and Kansas City Scouts joined the NHL 5 or so years later, the Scouts took older guys, the Caps all youth. Didn't work out for either new franchise. They were both dreadful, for years

Trivia question: Where did the Scouts relocate to? I don't know the answer as I type the question.
They became The New Jersey Devils.

 29 
 on: June 05, 2018, 11:57:51 AM 
Started by Robb_K - Last post by JoeC
Mike, you musta loved the early 70s Redskins when George Allen brought in all his old LA Rams players (like Myron Pottios, Jack Pardee, Maxie Baughan, Diron Talbert, etc)  -- all of whom were in their 30s, several mid to late 30s. But ... he turned a very bad organization around quickly! The "Over The Hill Gang."

The St. Louis Blues did it right, from the get-go and were rewarded. When the Caps and Kansas City Scouts joined the NHL 5 or so years later, the Scouts took older guys, the Caps all youth. Didn't work out for either new franchise. They were both dreadful, for years

Trivia question: Where did the Scouts relocate to? I don't know the answer as I type the question.

 30 
 on: June 05, 2018, 10:42:08 AM 
Started by Robb_K - Last post by bklynmike101
The Blues were much better than all the other expansion teams, and behaved much more like "The Original 6" than like the other expansion teams. They had superior goaltending from GlennHall(still in his prime-at least their first 2 years). They had an excellent defence, better than at least 3 of "The Original 6", with Doug Harvey, Al Arbour, Barclay and Bob Plager, Noel Picard, and Jean-Guy Talbot. They had better offence than all the other expansion teams, with legitimate stars in Dickie Moore and Red Berenson, and decent support in goal-scorer, Gary Sabourin, set-up man, Frank St. Marseille, and support from Don McKenney, Gerry Melnyk and Jimmy Roberts. They dominated Detroit and Toronto, and were able to play respectably vs. The other 4 Original teams. They looked respectable against The Habs in The Finals, despite losing all 4 games (technically being "swept".  But they played very well in all 4 games, and were in them all till the end, losing all by only 1 goal, and taking 2 of the 4 to OT.  The Blues' bruising defence and Hall's phenomenal goaltending stifled The Habs' superior offence. The Blues got even better, adding Jacques Plante, Phil Goyette and Ab McDonald in Year 2.  They got NO help from the junior draft in Year1. Vegas got 3 1st Rounders, plus were able to get Fleury and several good skaters in The Expansion draft, because only 1 goalie, 3 defensemen and 4 forwards could be protected. 1967 Expansion left few players of ANY value exposed.

Robb, I remember that particular Blues team well. For reasons unknown, I've always been partial to "old" players in all sports. Those original Blues consisted of many NHL "oldie castoffs", even a few dredged back up from the AHL. Plante-Hall-Harvey-Arbour-Picard-Talbot, and of course Dickie Moore are some of the examples I can recall. A bunch of upstart pensioners winning the "expansion" division.

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