DOO-WOP/OLDIES FORUM - Welcome
May 19, 2019, 06:07:11 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: ATTENTION:
NO COMMERCIAL SITES OR LINKS TO COMMERCIAL SITES ALLOWED ON THIS FORUM. IF YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL,
ie, CLOTHES, RECORDS, FURNTURE, ETC. DON'T DO IT HERE. THE URL WILL BE DELETED...  Mike Paladino
 
   Home   Help Login Register  
Pages: 1 ... 8 9 [10]
 91 
 on: May 05, 2019, 01:49:53 PM 
Started by JoeC - Last post by bklynmike101
That one hit by Maz made me cry - really cry. I was 8, being dragged around by my mom in Mays' (not Macy's)  department store  downtown (Brooklyn).  The game was carried live over the store's loudspeakers.
Strangest World Series ever, with all the Yankees' statistical dominance.

I used to shop on Fulton Street occasionally from the early 60s through mid-70s. All those big Dept Stores. May's later became a Macy's store, right? I remember A&S, of course, and E.J. Korvette's (bought many albums there -- really good prices back then).

First time I was in Brooklyn was at 8 years old, when my mom, younger brother and I stayed for two weeks at the Hotel St. George in Brooklyn Heights, awaiting the ocean voyage to Germany. (Back then, didn't realize the Dodgers' office was so close by; if I had, might've dropped by). Ocean liner sailed from the Brooklyn Navy Yard. No fancy Manhattan pier departure for military dependents!

Macy's bought ought The May Company in San Francisco and Los Angeles (in the early 1970s?).  I didn't know that The May Co. existed outside California.  It certainly never existed in The Midwest.  But, then, I don't seem to remember ever seeing any Macy's in The Midwest.

The May's chain prevalent in the NYC area had nothing to do with the west coast May Company. Just similar nomenclature.

Unrelated, I just recently learned that the current Milwaukee Brewers logo, which I thought was merely a baseball nested inside a baseball glove, is actually the letters MB for Milwaukee Brewers. Clever.   

 92 
 on: May 05, 2019, 12:58:14 PM 
Started by bklynmike101 - Last post by JoeC
Yes, I'm from West Kildonan.  My sister still lives there.  That's why my uncle knew Andy.  My parents knew The Bathgates.  Andy was a very nice and soft-spoken guy.  He was a straight-shooter with a lot of integrity.  The Rangers trained in Winnipeg because they owned The Winnipeg Rangers (the team that owned my own rights).  Or was it that The New York Rangers' owners started The Winnipeg Rangers Junior A team there, BECAUSE they already had been training in Winnipeg for many years???

Yes, back in the 1940s and 1950s, the NHL rinks were NOT standard.  Boston'e and New York's were very small.  Home games were a distinct advantage, because the local team knew all the nuances and peculiarities of their rink.  Like blind people, they knew, by instinct, exactly how many strides they were from the boards at every position on the ice, without looking up or away from where they were looking (at opposing players).  They knew how the puck would bounce off the wall and the stansions.

That's interesting about the rink size.

Another thing Andy said in that old article was that he was NEVER recognized in the four American cities with NHL teams (including NYC) when he was just walking around the streets. Whereas, even though he was an "opponent," he couldn't walk a block in Toronto or Montreal without people recognizing, and speaking to, him.

Lastly, he mentions the late Bryan Hextall (All Star Ranger from the 1940s) as being kind to him with the sticks. I take it all the rest of the NHL Hextall's were his sons and grandson?

 93 
 on: May 05, 2019, 11:16:58 AM 
Started by bklynmike101 - Last post by Robb_K
Robb, you were from West Kildonan, right?
Regardless, thought you might enjoy these excerpts from a VERY old Sports Illustrated profile of Andy Bathgate, "a (boy) from the Winnipeg suburb of West Kildonan on the wind-swept Manitoba plains":
- One of the minor tragedies of the New York fans is that Bathgate is not at his absolute best on the small rink in Madison Square Garden. On the larger rinks on the road he has more freedom to do what comes naturally.
i never knew the MSG rink was smaller than others in the Original Six. Were they all different sizes?  Wonder if he wore #9 in tribute to Howe and Richard? Also, when he was a kid, he said that he and his pals always "shot high" because low shots "broke sticks and ankles." He still carried that bad habit into the NHL and had to consciously change that mind set.  

Yes, I'm from West Kildonan.  My sister still lives there.  That's why my uncle knew Andy.  My parents knew The Bathgates.  Andy was a very nice and soft-spoken guy.  He was a straight-shooter with a lot of integrity.  The Rangers trained in Winnipeg because they owned The Winnipeg Rangers (the team that owned my own rights).  Or was it that The New York Rangers' owners started The Winnipeg Rangers Junior A team there, BECAUSE they already had been training in Winnipeg for many years???

Yes, back in the 1940s and 1950s, the NHL rinks were NOT standard.  Boston'e and New York's were very small.  Home games were a distinct advantage, because the local team knew all the nuances and peculiarities of their rink.  Like blind people, they knew, by instinct, exactly how many strides they were from the boards at every position on the ice, without looking up or away from where they were looking (at opposing players).  They knew how the puck would bounce off the wall and the stansions.

 94 
 on: May 05, 2019, 08:34:13 AM 
Started by bklynmike101 - Last post by JoeC
Robb, you were from West Kildonan, right?

Regardless, thought you might enjoy these excerpts from a VERY old Sports Illustrated profile of Andy Bathgate, "a (boy) from the Winnipeg suburb of West Kildonan on the wind-swept Manitoba plains":

- Off the ice, Bathgate is a likable and unaffected man of unusually abstemious habits. Alcohol has never touched his lips, nor tobacco smoke his lungs.

- He was no lover of schoolwork (and) did not attend school after the 10th grade.

- Apparently,every morning he and his pals walked 5 miles ("the trolley hasn't yet begun its rounds") to their goal—an indoor rink at the only time they can have it in hockey-mad Winnipeg, from 6 to 8 a.m. Leaving grudgingly at 8 they ride the trolley back to West Kildonan." Temp was often 20 below, or colder. He once recalled a -54 reading inside the unheated rink.

- In those days the Rangers trained in Winnipeg, and Bathgate snatched every opportunity to watch them practice. One day, Bryan Hextall, a Ranger star of the day, talked to him and began to cadge sticks for him. Most of them were broken, but there was "the odd good stick," and Bathgate's eyes gleam today in the remembrance.

- When first called up: "All my life I had been a goal scorer, but right then the Rangers wanted me to hang back and do a lot of checking for a line that had Wally Hergesheimer and Paul Ronty as the scorers.

- In a game last season he cracked a rising slap shot between the top goal post and the shoulder of the startled Montreal goalie, Jacques Plante, from beyond the blue line, about 75 feet away.

- One of the minor tragedies of the New York fans is that Bathgate is not at his absolute best on the small rink in Madison Square Garden. On the larger rinks on the road he has more freedom to do what comes naturally.

i never knew the MSG rink was smaller than others in the Original Six. Were they all different sizes?  Wonder if he wore #9 in tribute to Howe and Richard? Also, when he was a kid, he said that he and his pals always "shot high" because low shots "broke sticks and ankles." He still carried that bad habit into the NHL and had to consciously change that mind set.  

 95 
 on: May 04, 2019, 10:27:30 PM 
Started by bklynmike101 - Last post by Robb_K
I hear you but these guys were SMALL. Henry once weighed 138 pounds at season's end. Wally Hergesheimer went between 145-150. Lewicki about the same. I know Wally, like Bathgate, was from Winnipeg. Did you ever cross paths?

My recollections of these players were that Camille Henry was especially effective on the power play. Lewicki was an under-achiever who played no defense. Hergy was great around the net in traffic, converted many rebounds. Despite his size, he seemed to lose himself somehow around the creae. Not a physical player at all. A right-handed shot, I think he only had half a middle and half an index finger on his right hand.

Red Sullivan. What I recall most was Doug Harvey spearing him, almost to death (a priest gave him the Last Rites). It was that bad. Red still might hold the all-time AHL record for points in a season, with the Hershey Bears. Seemed like a fine gent and, even though a very good goal scorer, pretty unselfish with the puck. Lotta assists.

I watched ALL of those players play.  Yes, I met Andy Bathgate.  He came to my Winnipeg Rangers MJHL training camp in my last Midget year, just before I moved with my parents to Chicago.  Had I stayed in Winnipeg with my aunt and uncle, so I could pursue a hockey career, I'd have been property of The New York Rangers.  There were no free agents at that time, and the 6 NHL teams sponsored all The Junior A, AAA and Junior B teams in Canada.  I also talked to him during the pre-game warm-ups, whenever The Rangers played The Black Hawks, after we moved to Chicago (and also twice during Christmas vacation, which we often spent there). I also used to talk to Wally Hergesheimer (also from Winnipeg) both in Winnipeg, and In Chicago, when he played for The Hawks in the mid-late 1950s.  My uncle, who took us to the games, was from Winnipeg, and had played Junior hockey.  He knew both of them.  Winnipeg was like a small town.  ALL The Jews knew each other, ALL The First Nation's people knew each other, ALL The Ukes knew each other, and ALL the people in the hockey community knew each other.  My uncle was a pee wee and midget coach, which is why we had such a big backyard rink taking up both our backyard and my uncle's and aunts'.  

 96 
 on: May 04, 2019, 06:35:58 PM 
Started by bklynmike101 - Last post by JoeC
I'm still mad at the Rangers for trading away Jean-Guy Gendron after the '58 season. One of my favorites in that era. Scarppy little winger who would drop his gloves at a moment's notice, despite weighing about 160 lbs soaking wet.

My favorite Rangers always seemed to be the little guys like Camille Henry, Danny Lewicki and Wally Hergesheimer. Red Sullivan as well. He was taller than those guys but skinny.
Robb, think any of those guys could play today?

Why not?  Small players still play, if they can skate fast enough and have good enough edgework to get operating room for themselves, and they have good hockey sense. 

I hear you but these guys were SMALL. Henry once weighed 138 pounds at season's end. Wally Hergesheimer went between 145-150. Lewicki about the same. I know Wally, like Bathgate, was from Winnipeg. Did you ever cross paths?

My recollections of these players were that Camille Henry was especially effective on the power play. Lewicki was an under-achiever who played no defense. Hergy was great around the net in traffic, converted many rebounds. Despite his size, he seemed to lose himself somehow around the creae. Not a physical player at all. A right-handed shot, I think he only had half a middle and half an index finger on his right hand.

Red Sullivan. What I recall most was Doug Harvey spearing him, almost to death (a priest gave him the Last Rites). It was that bad. Red still might hold the all-time AHL record for points in a season, with the Hershey Bears. Seemed like a fine gent and, even though a very good goal scorer, pretty unselfish with the puck. Lotta assists.

 97 
 on: May 04, 2019, 06:08:17 PM 
Started by bklynmike101 - Last post by Robb_K
I'm still mad at the Rangers for trading away Jean-Guy Gendron after the '58 season. One of my favorites in that era. Scarppy little winger who would drop his gloves at a moment's notice, despite weighing about 160 lbs soaking wet.

My favorite Rangers always seemed to be the little guys like Camille Henry, Danny Lewicki and Wally Hergesheimer. Red Sullivan as well. He was taller than those guys but skinny.
Robb, think any of those guys could play today?

Why not?  Small players still play, if they can skate fast enough and have good enough edgework to get operating room for themselves, and they have good hockey sense. 

 98 
 on: May 04, 2019, 05:06:47 PM 
Started by bklynmike101 - Last post by JoeC
I'm still mad at the Rangers for trading away Jean-Guy Gendron after the '58 season. One of my favorites in that era. Scarppy little winger who would drop his gloves at a moment's notice, despite weighing about 160 lbs soaking wet.

My favorite Rangers always seemed to be the little guys like Camille Henry, Danny Lewicki and Wally Hergesheimer. Red Sullivan as well. He was taller than those guys but skinny.

Robb, think any of those guys could play today?

 99 
 on: May 04, 2019, 04:29:28 PM 
Started by JoeC - Last post by JoeC
That one hit by Maz made me cry - really cry. I was 8, being dragged around by my mom in Mays' (not Macy's)  department store  downtown (Brooklyn).  The game was carried live over the store's loudspeakers.
Strangest World Series ever, with all the Yankees' statistical dominance.

I used to shop on Fulton Street occasionally from the early 60s through mid-70s. All those big Dept Stores. May's later became a Macy's store, right? I remember A&S, of course, and E.J. Korvette's (bought many albums there -- really good prices back then).

First time I was in Brooklyn was at 8 years old, when my mom, younger brother and I stayed for two weeks at the Hotel St. George in Brooklyn Heights, awaiting the ocean voyage to Germany. (Back then, didn't realize the Dodgers' office was so close by; if I had, might've dropped by). Ocean liner sailed from the Brooklyn Navy Yard. No fancy Manhattan pier departure for military dependents!

Macy's bought ought The May Company in San Francisco and Los Angeles (in the early 1970s?).  I didn't know that The May Co. existed outside California.  It certainly never existed in The Midwest.  But, then, I don't seem to remember ever seeing any Macy's in The Midwest.

There was a Gimbel's (Macy's famed competitor) in Milwaukee though. I know that because, as a young kid in the mid-50s, I wanted a Milwaukee Braves satin jacket. Of course, Macys and Gimbels in Manhattan only sold Yankees, Giants and Dodgers gear. Gimbel's in NY ordered me that jacket through their Milwaukee store.

I was 12. The jacket arrives and every time I wore it I was unmercifully teased (kids can be so cruel!). The reason: One side of the open zipper was written "Bra" and the other side said "ves." So, I either kept it zipped up for the full Braves effect, or got the pre-teen zingers on "bra."

 100 
 on: May 04, 2019, 02:58:36 PM 
Started by JoeC - Last post by Robb_K
I read that their salary is $2,000 per month.  Kind of like in the B, C, & D  leagues in 50's baseball.

Wow!  That's terrible!  I'm semi-retired, and I make more than that.

Pages: 1 ... 8 9 [10]
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2006-2007, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.07 seconds with 16 queries.