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JoeC
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« Reply #570 on: September 26, 2018, 08:23:06 AM »

Robb--wasn't your  favorite Eddie  Yost?  Or Carlos Paula. Grin Grin Grin Grin Grin

BTW, I recently  was  in Oakland to  see  Yanks.   Theres  a bar  in the  stadium  named  the  Shibe  Park. None  of the  very few As  fans knew where  the name  Shibe  came  from. Amazing.   BTW,  the worst   piece of s--t   stadium  by a factor  of 100.

Are the A's getting their longed-for new stadium? With the Raiders soon to be gone, you'd think the A's would be holding all the cards now.
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bklynmike101
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« Reply #571 on: September 26, 2018, 11:47:52 AM »

Agree with you on the Oakland Coliseum (new name now but who cares)  as a wretched place to watch baseball - I've been there.

As to Busby, yes, not as obscure as Zeke Bella, Frank Leja (good one), or Cuno Barragon. But how many folks today remember the likes of Busby, Willie Tasby, Willie Kirkland, Dick Gernert, et al?

Would you accept semi-obscure? However you define them, I remember them, their baseball cards, and stats fondly.

Yes, Jose Valdivielso, Herb Plews, and of course, the immortal Norm Zauchin, will always go together in my trivia-infused brain!   
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JoeC
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« Reply #572 on: September 26, 2018, 11:50:25 AM »

Agree with you on the Oakland Coliseum (new name now but who cares)  as a wretched place to watch baseball - I've been there.

As to Busby, yes, not as obscure as Zeke Bella, Frank Leja (good one), or Cuno Barragon. But how many folks today remember the likes of Busby, Willie Tasby, Willie Kirkland, Dick Gernert, et al?

Would you accept semi-obscure? However you define them, I remember them, their baseball cards, and stats fondly.

Yes, Jose Valdivielso, Herb Plews, and of course, the immortal Norm Zauchin, will always go together in my trivia-infused brain!   

Hell, casual fans don't remember who played for their home team 10 years ago, no less 50 or 60 years.
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Robb_K
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« Reply #573 on: September 26, 2018, 09:33:05 PM »

Robb--wasn't your  favorite Eddie  Yost?  Or Carlos Paula. Grin Grin Grin Grin Grin

BTW, I recently  was  in Oakland to  see  Yanks.   There's  a bar  in the  stadium  named  the  Shibe  Park. None  of the  very few As  fans knew where  the name  Shibe  came  from. Amazing.   BTW,  the worst   piece of s--t   stadium  by a factor  of 100.
Not sure why you mentioned Eddie Yost with those others.  He had a terrific career and was an all star.  The "Walking Man" walked over 100 times in 8 seasons, and over 90 in one more, and scored over 100 runs in 5 seasons, and 90 in one more, on a very weak-hitting team, not getting much help. He was a .260 hitter in a giant park.  He was a regular for 14 straight years.  He was a great fielding all star 3rd Baseman.  He was far from obscure.
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JoeC
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« Reply #574 on: September 27, 2018, 08:26:21 AM »

Robb--wasn't your  favorite Eddie  Yost?  Or Carlos Paula. Grin Grin Grin Grin Grin

BTW, I recently  was  in Oakland to  see  Yanks.   There's  a bar  in the  stadium  named  the  Shibe  Park. None  of the  very few As  fans knew where  the name  Shibe  came  from. Amazing.   BTW,  the worst   piece of s--t   stadium  by a factor  of 100.
Not sure why you mentioned Eddie Yost with those others.  He had a terrific career and was an all star.  The "Walking Man" walked over 100 times in 8 seasons, and over 90 in one more, and scored over 100 runs in 5 seasons, and 90 in one more, on a very weak-hitting team, not getting much help. He was a .260 hitter in a giant park.  He was a regular for 14 straight years.  He was a great fielding all star 3rd Baseman.  He was far from obscure.

One of the best leadoff men ever. 7th All-Time in walks. Broke into the big leagues in WWII as a 17 year old.

Don't know if still true but a good baseball trivia question was/is "Which player had the biggest disparity between batting average and On-base Pct?" Answer was Yost when he played in Detroit. Hit like .260, but with an OBP around .420




« Last Edit: September 27, 2018, 08:30:01 AM by JoeC » Logged
Robb_K
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« Reply #575 on: September 27, 2018, 10:13:16 AM »

Robb--wasn't your  favorite Eddie  Yost?  Or Carlos Paula. Grin Grin Grin Grin Grin

BTW, I recently  was  in Oakland to  see  Yanks.   There's  a bar  in the  stadium  named  the  Shibe  Park. None  of the  very few As  fans knew where  the name  Shibe  came  from. Amazing.   BTW,  the worst   piece of s--t   stadium  by a factor  of 100.
Not sure why you mentioned Eddie Yost with those others.  He had a terrific career and was an all star.  The "Walking Man" walked over 100 times in 8 seasons, and over 90 in one more, and scored over 100 runs in 5 seasons, and 90 in one more, on a very weak-hitting team, not getting much help. He was a .260 hitter in a giant park.  He was a regular for 14 straight years.  He was a great fielding all star 3rd Baseman.  He was far from obscure.

One of the best leadoff men ever. 7th All-Time in walks. Broke into the big leagues in WWII as a 17 year old.

Don't know if still true but a good baseball trivia question was/is "Which player had the biggest disparity between batting average and On-base Pct?" Answer was Yost when he played in Detroit. Hit like .260, but with an OBP around .420

Yes, and he had a ridiculous amount of walks 130?, and he led The AL in scoring, with 115 runs.  .260 wasn't a bad average for 1959.  Imagine if he had been a .300 hitter!  He'd have been on base half the time!
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JoeC
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« Reply #576 on: September 27, 2018, 11:50:10 AM »

Robb--wasn't your  favorite Eddie  Yost?  Or Carlos Paula. Grin Grin Grin Grin Grin

BTW, I recently  was  in Oakland to  see  Yanks.   There's  a bar  in the  stadium  named  the  Shibe  Park. None  of the  very few As  fans knew where  the name  Shibe  came  from. Amazing.   BTW,  the worst   piece of s--t   stadium  by a factor  of 100.
Not sure why you mentioned Eddie Yost with those others.  He had a terrific career and was an all star.  The "Walking Man" walked over 100 times in 8 seasons, and over 90 in one more, and scored over 100 runs in 5 seasons, and 90 in one more, on a very weak-hitting team, not getting much help. He was a .260 hitter in a giant park.  He was a regular for 14 straight years.  He was a great fielding all star 3rd Baseman.  He was far from obscure.

Difference between Eddie Yost and Nellie Fox was Nellie was looking to swing the bat. Fox had tons of confidence he was gonna make contact. Nellie took his walks too but averaged only 15 K's a season (can anyone imagine that today when non-sluggers strike out that much in a week). Yost averaged 70 strike outs a season, in comparison.

One of the best leadoff men ever. 7th All-Time in walks. Broke into the big leagues in WWII as a 17 year old.

Don't know if still true but a good baseball trivia question was/is "Which player had the biggest disparity between batting average and On-base Pct?" Answer was Yost when he played in Detroit. Hit like .260, but with an OBP around .420

Yes, and he had a ridiculous amount of walks 130?, and he led The AL in scoring, with 115 runs.  .260 wasn't a bad average for 1959.  Imagine if he had been a .300 hitter!  He'd have been on base half the time!
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bklynmike101
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« Reply #577 on: September 27, 2018, 02:35:33 PM »

Agree with you on the Oakland Coliseum (new name now but who cares)  as a wretched place to watch baseball - I've been there.

As to Busby, yes, not as obscure as Zeke Bella, Frank Leja (good one), or Cuno Barragon. But how many folks today remember the likes of Busby, Willie Tasby, Willie Kirkland, Dick Gernert, et al?

Would you accept semi-obscure? However you define them, I remember them, their baseball cards, and stats fondly.

Yes, Jose Valdivielso, Herb Plews, and of course, the immortal Norm Zauchin, will always go together in my trivia-infused brain!   

Hell, casual fans don't remember who played for their home team 10 years ago, no less 50 or 60 years.

 Grin
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Robb_K
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« Reply #578 on: September 27, 2018, 04:45:04 PM »

Hell, casual fans don't remember who played for their home team 10 years ago, no less 50 or 60 years.
Grin

I have to admit that Cuno Barragon is obscure enough to be called "obscure"  Grin  I can remember ALL the players who played regularly at each position, for The Cubs and White Sox during the very late 1940s and all through the '50s and early '60s.  Late '60s I'm not as good.  After that, my knowledge is the same as a "baseball mom".  Grin
« Last Edit: September 27, 2018, 08:34:48 PM by Robb_K » Logged

bklynmike101
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« Reply #579 on: September 27, 2018, 07:35:31 PM »

Agree with you on the Oakland Coliseum (new name now but who cares)  as a wretched place to watch baseball - I've been there.

As to Busby, yes, not as obscure as Zeke Bella, Frank Leja (good one), or Cuno Barragon. But how many folks today remember the likes of Busby, Willie Tasby, Willie Kirkland, Dick Gernert, et al?

Would you accept semi-obscure? However you define them, I remember them, their baseball cards, and stats fondly.

Yes, Jose Valdivielso, Herb Plews, and of course, the immortal Norm Zauchin, will always go together in my trivia-infused brain!   

Hell, casual fans don't remember who played for their home team 10 years ago, no less 50 or 60 years.
Grin

I have to admit that Cuno Barragon is obscure enough to be called "obscure"  Grin  I can remember ALL the players who played regularly at each position, for The Cubs and White Sox during the very late 1940s and all through the '50s and early '60s.  Late '60s I'm not as good.  After that, my knoledge is the same as a "baseball mom".  Grin

I'm pretty much the same with the late 50's/early-mid 60's Yankees and early-mid 60's Mets. As for baseball mom, when I first introduced my wife to baseball she referred to the white things that players sometimes run to and step on, as ........pillows! Grin
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Robb_K
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« Reply #580 on: September 27, 2018, 08:36:54 PM »

We're leaving too many quotations in these threads, which results in our current post being buried in a purple box, as if it were a quote from a previous post.  Let's not imbed more than 2 previous quotes.
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Robb_K
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« Reply #581 on: September 29, 2018, 02:34:32 PM »

No one remembers any other player/managers???
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JoeC
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« Reply #582 on: September 29, 2018, 05:04:31 PM »

No one remembers any other player/managers???

Don't know how I forgot one of my favorite players, Eddie Joost, with the Philadelphia A's. A's owners (Connie Mack's sons) were simply too cheap or hard up to pay a full-time manager.

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doctordoowop
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« Reply #583 on: September 29, 2018, 11:20:35 PM »

Robb--see  I learned  a lot  about  Yost.   Thanx.  Walt Dropo,  Billy  Consolo  (knew  his cousin),  Ted Lepcio--list is  infiniti minus one. Grin Grin Grin.  My daughter's  principal was  Mr. Fitzgerald--  yes I  asked-he  was (catcher)  Ed Fitzgerald's  cousin.

Many are  listed  in  "Aaron  to Zuverink,"
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Robb_K
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« Reply #584 on: September 30, 2018, 03:18:31 AM »

Robb--see  I learned  a lot  about  Yost.   Thanx.  Walt Dropo,  Billy  Consolo  (knew  his cousin),  Ted Lepcio--list is  infiniti minus one. Grin Grin Grin.  My daughter's  principal was  Mr. Fitzgerald--  yes I  asked-he  was (catcher)  Ed Fitzgerald's  cousin.

Many are  listed  in  "Aaron  to Zuverink,"
NONE of those players are "obscure", they ALL were regulars for at least one year, most for several years.  Dropo was a power hitter, but not a good fielder.  George Zuverink was a decent pitcher.  Ed Fitzgerald was a pretty decent catcher.
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JoeC
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« Reply #585 on: September 30, 2018, 08:32:03 AM »

Wonder who had the better glove, Dropo or Dick "Stone Fingers" Stuart?

Announcers often mentioned Dropo's hometown of Moosup, Connecticut on broadcasts. Guess they were as intrigued by it as I was. Although I never heard it, one of his nicknames was supposedly "The Moose From Moosup." Little village in the extreme northeastern part of the state.
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Robb_K
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« Reply #586 on: September 30, 2018, 11:42:48 AM »

Wonder who had the better glove, Dropo or Dick "Stone Fingers" Stuart?

Announcers often mentioned Dropo's hometown of Moosup, Connecticut on broadcasts. Guess they were as intrigued by it as I was. Although I never heard it, one of his nicknames was supposedly "The Moose From Moosup." Little village in the extreme northeastern part of the state.
His nickname was "Moose".  MLB had a LOT of terrible fielding first basemen.  That's where the most terrible fielders were "hidden".   And the only way such a terrible fielder could play on that level was if he could hit for both power and average.  Later in history, (1963 to now), such players needed to just hit home runs, and they could play in The Majors.  But they SHOULDN'T have played there (same for DH).  Striking out 250 times to hit .220, just to hit 30 HR and have 80 RBI, and NEVER be on base, doesn't help a team.  It hurts a team.
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doctordoowop
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« Reply #587 on: September 30, 2018, 12:07:18 PM »

Think Consolo  &  Lepcio  were  obscure.
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Robb_K
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« Reply #588 on: September 30, 2018, 01:34:03 PM »

Think Consolo  &  Lepcio  were  obscure.

I'd say they were less memorable than 10-year regulars.  But people who watched The Red Sox during the '50s should remember them well enough.  Mel Roach, Jim Pisoni, Sal Yvars are somewhat obscure.  But, even then, I would guess that people who were kid fans during the '50s, and collected baseball cards, should remember them.
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bklynmike101
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« Reply #589 on: September 30, 2018, 01:43:50 PM »

Robb,

What about the likes of Reno Bertoia, Julio Becquer, and Ralph Lumenti? Ray Monzant? Ray Daviault? Valmy Thomas?

Or from a previous era, I had the distinct privilege in the 1970's of meeting Bob Burman when my dad had him come up to our apartment for a short visit. He told great stories of the old days - Cobb, etc.  For those not in the know, Burman caught Walter Johnson, having been a catcher in spring training, and one or two regular season games games for the Senators in 1918. He later went on to become a career high school teacher.   
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Robb_K
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« Reply #590 on: September 30, 2018, 02:54:54 PM »

Robb,

What about the likes of Reno Bertoia, Julio Becquer, and Ralph Lumenti? Ray Monzant? Ray Daviault? Valmy Thomas?

Or from a previous era, I had the distinct privilege in the 1970's of meeting Bob Burman when my dad had him come up to our apartment for a short visit. He told great stories of the old days - Cobb, etc.  For those not in the know, Burman caught Walter Johnson, having been a catcher in spring training, and one or two regular season games games for the Senators in 1918. He later went on to become a career high school teacher.   

Burman is obscure.  So is Ray Daviault.  I've never seen that name.  When did he play, and for whom?  Ray Monzant, Valmy Thomas and Reno Bertoia should be known by '50s and early '60s fans.  They layed a fair number of years, and had several cards, each.  Ralph Lumenti is a little less known, but I remember him.
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Robb_K
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« Reply #591 on: September 30, 2018, 03:21:43 PM »

Robb?s New Baseball Quiz #1

1) Name as many players as you can who played for both or all 3 of the major league teams in their city.

2) What team in which year or years, had their top 4 starting pitchers ALL be knuckleballers?

3) What pitcher was traded the most times?

4) How did The White Sox get Nellie Fox?

5) How did The White Sox get Billy Pierce?

6) How did The Red Sox get Jackie Jensen?

7) How did The Red Sox get Vern Stephens?

Cool How did The Browns get slugger, Vic Wertz from The Tigers in 1952?

9) How did The Browns get Tommy Byrne from The Yankees in 1951?

10) How did The Dodgers get Andy Pafko in 1951?
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doctordoowop
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« Reply #592 on: September 30, 2018, 04:34:46 PM »

Jensen--bought from Yanks.

Pafko--Cubs  got Hermanski.

I'll get back on number 1 but start w/Leiter & Cone.  Hodges Snider, Yogi, on Mets.
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JoeC
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« Reply #593 on: September 30, 2018, 04:49:42 PM »

If you were a NY Giants fan in the 50s, you knew of Ray Monzant and Valmy Thomas. Ray (Ramon) was a skinny right-hander from Venezuela who pitched as a reliever/spot starter for 3-4 years in the mid-50s at the Polo Grounds. Valmy was the first-ever player from the Virgin Islands. Diminutive little catcher who played in '57, the Giants last year in NYC. 
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Robb_K
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« Reply #594 on: September 30, 2018, 06:09:51 PM »


#6 As far as I've heard and read there were Red Sox players that went to The Senators in return, in addition to cash.  Who were they?
#10 - It was a 4 player for 4 player trade.  Yes, Hermanski and Pafko were the main pieces.  Do you remember any of the others?
I've never heard of Leiter or Cone.  They must be from the late 1970s or later, of which I know absolutely NOTHING.  I remember Ray Crone.  But that is not "Cone".
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JoeC
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« Reply #595 on: September 30, 2018, 07:52:15 PM »

#6 As far as I've heard and read there were Red Sox players that went to The Yankees in return, in addition to cash.  Who were they?
#10 - It was a 4 player for 4 player trade.  Yes, Hermanski and Pafko were the main pieces.  Do you remember any of the others?
I've never heard of Leiter or Cone.  They must be from the late 1970s or later, of which I know absolutely NOTHING.  I remember Ray Crone.  But that is not "Cone".

Answer to #6 is wrong. Jackie Jensen was traded from the NYY to the Washington Senators in 1952. Then, a season later, the Senators traded Jackie to the Red Sox. As an old Senators fan, I'm sure of this. The Yankees got a great hitter, Irv Noren, from the Senators for Jackie. The Senators got Mickey McDermott and Tom Umphlett from the Red Sox for Jackie. Not one of their better deals.

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Robb_K
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« Reply #596 on: September 30, 2018, 08:40:41 PM »

#6 As far as I've heard and read there were Red Sox players that went to The Yankees in return, in addition to cash.  Who were they?
#10 - It was a 4 player for 4 player trade.  Yes, Hermanski and Pafko were the main pieces.  Do you remember any of the others?
I've never heard of Leiter or Cone.  They must be from the late 1970s or later, of which I know absolutely NOTHING.  I remember Ray Crone.  But that is not "Cone".

Answer to #6 is wrong. Jackie Jensen was traded from the NYY to the Washington Senators in 1952. Then, a season later, the Senators traded Jackie to the Red Sox. As an old Senators fan, I'm sure of this. The Yankees got a great hitter, Irv Noren, from the Senators for Jackie. The Senators got Mickey McDermott and Tom Umphlett from the Red Sox for Jackie. Not one of their better deals.

Sorry, I should have said that Boston gave up players to WASHINGTON for Jensen.  And Joe C.  is correct, The Senators got Mickey McDermott and Tom Umphlett from the Red Sox.  So, #6 is answered.
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Robb_K
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« Reply #597 on: September 30, 2018, 08:42:36 PM »

I have placed a new R&B quiz in the music forum.
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doctordoowop
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« Reply #598 on: September 30, 2018, 09:30:33 PM »

Ralph Branca --RIP--didn't think Sal Yvars  was  obscure.  Nor did Bobby  Thomsen.  Pretty sure it was Sal & not Ray Katt.
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JoeC
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« Reply #599 on: October 01, 2018, 09:08:06 AM »

#4. In one of the greatest baseball heists ever, White Sox got Fox from the A's for journeyman Catcher Joe Tipton.

#5. Classy lefty Billy Pierce (who had one of the sharpest breaking curves I ever saw) was picked up from Detroit. Was it just a $$ deal? I know his hometown Tigers thought they'd put one over on the White Sox because they thought Pierce had back problems that didn't bode well for his future. It was cruel how many complete game 1-0 or 2-1 pitching losses Billy had against Whitey Ford in the mid to late 50s.
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