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Author Topic: Baseball Threaad (especially from the time of our youth)  (Read 21138 times)
JoeC
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« Reply #360 on: December 02, 2017, 09:40:10 AM »

New NYY Manager: Aaron Boone from Villa Park HS and Southern Cal.
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Robb_K
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« Reply #361 on: December 02, 2017, 12:43:25 PM »

New NYY Manager: Aaron Boone from Villa Park HS and Southern Cal.
Is he one of Ray Boone's grandsons or great grandsons?  I know that his sons and a grandson ot two were players and managers.
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doctordoowop
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« Reply #362 on: December 02, 2017, 01:15:44 PM »

GRANDSON.    Ray's  son is catcher  Bob.  Bob's sons  are  Bret  and  Aaron.

Aaron  is good on TV--but Bret  stunk & had  stage fright. Grin Grin Grin Grin Grin Grin

Aren't ALL  Boones related to Daniel?  Including  Pat.
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Robb_K
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« Reply #363 on: December 02, 2017, 01:56:32 PM »

GRANDSON.    Ray's  son is catcher  Bob.  Bob's sons  are  Bret  and  Aaron.

Aaron  is good on TV--but Bret  stunk & had  stage fright. Grin Grin Grin Grin Grin Grin

Aren't ALL  Boones related to Daniel?  Including  Pat.

Pat is, or so he claims.  Not sure ALL Boones in North America are related.
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JoeC
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« Reply #364 on: December 02, 2017, 04:35:56 PM »

The Boone's, what a baseball family. Three generations.

I recall seeing Ray play 3B for the Detroit Tigers in the 50s. He grew up in San Diego. Played for same High School (Hoover) as Ted Williams, not too long after Ted.  Interesting that they all played in at least one All Star game.

I could be wrong but wasn't Bret suspected of juicing? Averaged less than 20 HR for multiple seasons then jumped up to 35 and 37 in the early 2000s.
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doctordoowop
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« Reply #365 on: December 02, 2017, 04:44:34 PM »

Agree Joe--he was. But  just  terrible on ESPN. 

I had a few Ray Boone cards--Indians, Sox,  very overlooked   Would have bee a star in NY  or Boston.
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doowopbob
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« Reply #366 on: December 03, 2017, 02:09:01 AM »

Yes JoeC, Bret was suspected of juicing and finally admitted it.

There have been a couple other 3 generation families in MLB: The Bells: Grandpa Gus; son Buddy; grandsons David and Mike.
I think the Hairistons and Flahertys all had 3 generations play MLB.
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JoeC
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« Reply #367 on: December 03, 2017, 09:23:23 AM »

You know your stuff Bob. Of course, with your reminder, I knew about the Bell's. Remember seeing Gus play the outfield (well, he stood in the OF anyway) for the Reds. One of those Reds teams was REAlly poerful Practically, everybody in the lineup exceprt powerless Roy McMillan and Johnny Temple had 30+ HRs. 

Talking about Ted Kluszewski, F Robby, Gus Bell, Ed Bailey, Wally Post, Jim Greengrass, etc. Of course, the old Crosley Field was tiny and didn't hurt their HR production. Kluszewski and Frank Robinson probably had 40+ easy.
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bklynmike101
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« Reply #368 on: December 03, 2017, 02:11:20 PM »

I still have my Ray Boone and Gus Bell baseball cards. Gus made it onto the Mets and was absolutely horrid - as were most of the old-timers grafted onto the '62/'63 Mets. But in their day, Gus, and to a lesser extent, Ray Boone could rake.   
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doowopbob
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« Reply #369 on: December 03, 2017, 07:54:52 PM »

JoeC - I love baseball and when I was much, much younger collected baseball cards and knew all the trivia.  My Dad was originally from Cincinnati before moving to California in the late 30s so he was a huge Redlegs/Reds fan until the day he died.  Speaking of the Reds, I remember the year their entire starting lineup was voted onto the All Star team by the fans and the commissioner made some changes.  The first MLB game I attended was at the Los Angeles Coliseum against the dreaded Giants.  Used to love watching Wally Moon hit his moon shots over the short, but very high, left field wall.

bklynmike - Ray Boone was a good hitter but in comparison to other 3B of the era, Eddie Mathews; Ken Boyer; Don Hoak, etc. he just didn't measure up in the power numbers.
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JoeC
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« Reply #370 on: December 03, 2017, 08:12:05 PM »

JoeC - I love baseball and when I was much, much younger collected baseball cards and knew all the trivia.  My Dad was originally from Cincinnati before moving to California in the late 30s so he was a huge Redlegs/Reds fan until the day he died.  Speaking of the Reds, I remember the year their entire starting lineup was voted onto the All Star team by the fans and the commissioner made some changes.  The first MLB game I attended was at the Los Angeles Coliseum against the dreaded Giants.  Used to love watching Wally Moon hit his moon shots over the short, but very high, left field wall.

bklynmike - Ray Boone was a good hitter but in comparison to other 3B of the era, Eddie Mathews; Ken Boyer; Don Hoak, etc. he just didn't measure up in the power numbers.


Bob, The year of that All-Star voting travesty was, I think, the year the Reds set the then-MLB team HR record for a season withthe lineup I mentioned.

Mike, Agree with you about Mathews and Boyer. They were MUCH better than Boone. Ray was definitely better than Hoak. Boone's career BA was .275 (to Hoak's .265) but Ray had twice as many HRs. Ray's best years, he was hitting 20+ HR a year. Hoak hit 19 in his top year of '57 with the Reds in their bandbox park.
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bklynmike101
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« Reply #371 on: December 04, 2017, 01:03:53 PM »

JoeC - I love baseball and when I was much, much younger collected baseball cards and knew all the trivia.  My Dad was originally from Cincinnati before moving to California in the late 30s so he was a huge Redlegs/Reds fan until the day he died.  Speaking of the Reds, I remember the year their entire starting lineup was voted onto the All Star team by the fans and the commissioner made some changes.  The first MLB game I attended was at the Los Angeles Coliseum against the dreaded Giants.  Used to love watching Wally Moon hit his moon shots over the short, but very high, left field wall.

bklynmike - Ray Boone was a good hitter but in comparison to other 3B of the era, Eddie Mathews; Ken Boyer; Don Hoak, etc. he just didn't measure up in the power numbers.


The year the Reds' fans stuffed the ballot boxes to elect all of the team's starters to the AS game, the league President or MLB commissioner stepped in and insisted on inserting Stan Musial in place of one of the Reds (maybe Klu at 1B). The story goes somehthing like that anyway.   
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JoeC
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« Reply #372 on: December 04, 2017, 05:31:24 PM »

The fans sorta still do that (stuffing the ballot box) today. I'd have the players vote (excluding players on their team). Then, you might get a better result. Actually, might even be better with only the managers and coaches voting (again, excluding their own players).
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doctordoowop
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« Reply #373 on: December 04, 2017, 10:29:12 PM »

I  know u   got  this Joe--Post  1st  HR  at  Dodger Stadium.
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doowopbob
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« Reply #374 on: December 05, 2017, 03:03:22 AM »

Post also hit one of the longest home runs at the coliseum, went into a tunnel in left center, wished I could have seen that blast.  If memory serves me correctly, Wes Covington and Willie Stargell are the only ones to come close to hitting one out of Dodger stadium.  We left SOCAL in 1982 and didn't follow them as much so I don't know if anyone has come close to doing it.
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JoeC
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« Reply #375 on: December 05, 2017, 08:59:16 AM »

I  know u   got  this Joe--Post  1st  HR  at  Dodger Stadium.

I had no clue, Doctor. I would loved to have seen just ONE game at the LA Coliseum. Must've really been a trip with that screen and all. Still find it hard to believe they didn't negotiate for Wrigley. Those PCL parks didn't seat many but the Giants used Seals Stadium and the Mariners used Sicks Stadium if I recall.

Post had a great arm too.

On the AS ballot-stuffing, from Wiiki:

"In 1957, Post and six of his Redleg teammates—Ed Bailey, Johnny Temple, Roy McMillan, Don Hoak, Gus Bell and Frank Robinson—were "voted" starters on the National League All-Star team, the result of a ballot stuffing campaign by Redlegs fans. Major League Baseball Commissioner Ford Frick intervened, removing Bell and Post from the starting line up and replacing them with Hank Aaron and Willie Mays. Frick allowed Bell to remain on the team as a reserve, while Post was injured and would have been unable to play in any event."
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Robb_K
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« Reply #376 on: December 05, 2017, 12:19:43 PM »

JoeC - I love baseball and when I was much, much younger collected baseball cards and knew all the trivia.  My Dad was originally from Cincinnati before moving to California in the late 30s so he was a huge Redlegs/Reds fan until the day he died.  Speaking of the Reds, I remember the year their entire starting lineup was voted onto the All Star team by the fans and the commissioner made some changes.  The first MLB game I attended was at the Los Angeles Coliseum against the dreaded Giants.  Used to love watching Wally Moon hit his moon shots over the short, but very high, left field wall.

bklynmike - Ray Boone was a good hitter but in comparison to other 3B of the era, Eddie Mathews; Ken Boyer; Don Hoak, etc. he just didn't measure up in the power numbers.




The year the Reds' fans stuffed the ballot boxes to elect all of the team's starters to the AS game, the league President or MLB commissioner stepped in and insisted on inserting Stan Musial in place of one of the Reds (maybe Klu at 1B). The story goes something like that anyway.



Also, Hank Aaron and Willie Mays were put in replacing Gus Bell and one of the other 2 Redlegs' outfielders (Wally Post?).
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doctordoowop
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« Reply #377 on: December 05, 2017, 02:24:49 PM »

I was there in late  60s?  when Stargell  hit  it  on  top of  visitor bullpen   roof.

Never knew about Covington.

Things have changed--with juiced players and balls--they regularly go out in  BP. 

Went to Coliseum  to see Dodger  Red  Sox exhibition  in 2008--50th anniversary  of coliseum. Scully was in his little booth.
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JoeC
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« Reply #378 on: December 05, 2017, 02:48:39 PM »

Wes Covington was a very underrated left handed bat. Never a star but pitchers did not like seeing him at the plate.

Once saw him hit two HRs in the first game of a doubleheader at the Polo Grounds against the Giants in their last season ('57) in NY. Both were hit right down the right field line which, if you can believe it, was even shorter than LF at the Polo Grounds. About 260 feet.
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bklynmike101
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« Reply #379 on: December 05, 2017, 08:47:41 PM »

Covington was one of those guys I instinctively liked for no special reason. He did have some crazy stats 1 or 2 years. To get it right, I've looked it up - in '57 in 321 at bats, he had only 4 doubles. but his bb card line ran as follows: 4 doubles - 8 triples - and 21 HR's. That's crazy stuff. batted a healthy .284 with 65 RBI's. In '58 he hit 24 dingers in 295 at bats, along with a career best .330 B. Avg. Strangely enough, he spent most of his post baseball life in Edmonton of all places.   
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JoeC
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« Reply #380 on: December 05, 2017, 09:32:26 PM »

Covington was at his best in the clutch. Lacked the consistency of a star but was one of those players that if you were a Braves fan in those early years of his career you had a lot of confidence he would come through against the opposition's top pitchers.

A natural hitter whose career stats, based on his ability, should have been better. Maybe he had some sort of limiting injury along the way. Don't know what held him back in terms of having a very good, but not quite great, career.
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doctordoowop
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« Reply #381 on: December 06, 2017, 04:47:46 PM »

Covington as I recall had  very bad legs--knees.  Why Hurricane Hazle helped them win in 57--in LF.  Bruton & Hank other 2 OFs.
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bklynmike101
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« Reply #382 on: December 06, 2017, 05:25:33 PM »

Throughout his solid MLB career, Bruton was listed as having been born in 1929. After his retirement, it was revealed that he was actually born in 1925. He was one of those guys a la Fausto Carmona and the unforgetttable Diomedes Olivo, who arrived in MLB as a (reported) 42* year old rookie in 1962.

*At the "real" age, as currently documented, of 43.**

(Olivo did appear in a few games in late 1960 but enjoyed official rookie status in 1962)

** According to some reports, he was yet older than that.
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JoeC
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« Reply #383 on: December 06, 2017, 08:59:36 PM »

That relocation of the Braves franchise from Boston to Milwaukee in 1953, and its immediate success, set in motion all the moves/expansion that followed. I think before that move to Milwaukee there had been no change in the major leagues for decades.

Milwaukee wasn't a big market then, or now, but how that city opened its arms and supported the Braves opened O'Malley's and Stoneham's eyes, big time.
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Robb_K
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« Reply #384 on: December 06, 2017, 09:38:35 PM »

Throughout his solid MLB career, Bruton was listed as having been born in 1929. After his retirement, it was revealed that he was actually born in 1925. He was one of those guys a la Fausto Carmona and the unforgetttable Diomedes Olivo, who arrived in MLB as a (reported) 42* year old rookie in 1962.

*At the "real" age, as currently documented, of 43.**

(Olivo did appear in a few games in late 1960 but enjoyed official rookie status in 1962)

** According to some reports, he was yet older than that.
No WONDER Bruton started sliding down fast in 1959 and 1960!  He was 34 and 35, rather than 30 and 31.  I always thought he had a very old, wrikle-ridden face for such a young player.  My eyes were not wrong.  So, Bruton might have been a plyer in The Negro Leagues for longer than the major league teams knew, and pretended to be younger so he could have a better chance to be signed to longer term contracts, and also to be signed at all.
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doctordoowop
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« Reply #385 on: December 06, 2017, 11:45:38 PM »

Robb--Bill Bruton  ended career  with  your  Tigers.

He  did look a bit  like Otis Nixon.

Wes' bad  legs explains  his  stats,  Joe.

Hats off to  Wisconsin fans.  Supported  Braves  &  of course  Green  Bay is nuts  over  Pack.

Dodgers  chose the  Coliseum  for $$$$-- O  Malley  ran BB then--the coliseum would never be  allowed now.
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JoeC
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« Reply #386 on: December 07, 2017, 06:42:52 AM »

What County Stadium had in 1953 that most other teams stadium's did not was PARKING for thousands of cars. Revolutionary at the time. Interesting that in recent decades, trend has come full circle in many ways.
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bklynmike101
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« Reply #387 on: December 07, 2017, 12:34:09 PM »

Throughout his solid MLB career, Bruton was listed as having been born in 1929. After his retirement, it was revealed that he was actually born in 1925. He was one of those guys a la Fausto Carmona and the unforgetttable Diomedes Olivo, who arrived in MLB as a (reported) 42* year old rookie in 1962.

*At the "real" age, as currently documented, of 43.**

(Olivo did appear in a few games in late 1960 but enjoyed official rookie status in 1962)

** According to some reports, he was yet older than that.
No WONDER Bruton started sliding down fast in 1859 and 1960!  He was 34 and 35, rather than 30 and 31.  I always thought he had a very old, wrikle-ridden face for such a young player.  My eyes were not wrong.  So, Bruton might have been a plyer in The Negro Leagues for longer than the major league teams knew, and pretended to be younger so he could have a better chance to be signed to longer term contracts, and also to be signed at all.

From SABR: "In 1950 [Judy] Johnson again talked up Bruton to his friend Bill Yancey, who had played with Johnson in the Negro Leagues. Yancey in turn recommended Bruton to Boston Braves scout Jack Ogden. The Braves invited Bruton to their minor-league spring-training camp. He impressed the Braves enough to be offered a professional contract, and signed immediately.[5]

Bruton was 23 years old when he signed his contract. The veteran Yancey knew his age, but fearing that he might be viewed as too old by the Braves, reported it as 21. According to Yancey, the Braves later changed Bruton’s reported age to 19. His true age was not publicly disclosed until the day he retired from baseball."
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Robb_K
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« Reply #388 on: December 08, 2017, 07:48:05 PM »

Robb--Bill Bruton  ended career  with  your  Tigers.

He  did look a bit  like Otis Nixon.

Wes' bad  legs explains  his  stats,  Joe.

Hats off to  Wisconsin fans.  Supported  Braves  &  of course  Green  Bay is nuts  over  Pack.

Dodgers  chose the  Coliseum  for $$$$-- O  Malley  ran BB then--the coliseum would never be  allowed now.

MY Tigers??? I was a Cubs and White Sox fan, as I visited family in Chicago in winter and summer vacations from age 2 through to 14, when I moved to Chicago with my parents and siblings and grandparents.  I've never liked The Tigers.  I just like Detroit's R&B, Blues, Gospel and Soul nusic, NOT their sports teams.  I absolutely hate The Red Wings (despite having Wing, Gordie Howe, as my favourite player).
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JoeC
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« Reply #389 on: December 09, 2017, 08:30:53 AM »

The Bruton discussion reminded me of a former MLB player who was still playing in AAA at a high level in the mid-50s. (I saw alot of International League ball at that time.)  Talking about Sam "The Jet" Jethroe. God knows how old he was then but ... the guy could still hit and literally flew around the base paths. One of the fastest players I ever saw.
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