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bklynmike101
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« Reply #450 on: March 29, 2018, 12:56:57 AM »

I was and remain the proud owner of a gen-u-ine Dave Balon Montreal Canadians hockey stick obtained directly from Balon at MSG circa 1967-8. Not having access to ice, not to mention barely being able to stand up on ice skates, the stick was used as my stick of choice (also my only stick) in our "field hockey" endeavors played on CONCRETE.  Angry Needless to say, the stick is in something less than pristine condition, especially the taped together shards of wood that constitute the blade. 

I also had a Tony Hrkac autographed picture that he signed for me at a Milwaukee Admirals (IHL) game in '96. Unfortunately, I can't seem to find it.

Maybe I should look for a Lou Angotti model?   
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Robb_K
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« Reply #451 on: March 29, 2018, 02:56:56 AM »

I was and remain the proud owner of a gen-u-ine Dave Balon Montreal Canadians hockey stick obtained directly from Balon at MSG circa 1967-8. Not having access to ice, not to mention barely being able to stand up on ice skates, the stick was used as my stick of choice (also my only stick) in our "field hockey" endeavors played on CONCRETE.  Angry Needless to say, the stick is in something less than pristine condition, especially the taped together shards of wood that constitute the blade. 

I also had a Tony Hrkac autographed picture that he signed for me at a Milwaukee Admirals (IHL) game in '96. Unfortunately, I can't seem to find it.

Maybe I should look for a Lou Angotti model?   
Who made the Dave Bacon stick?  Lou Angotti was once traded by St. Louis to Pittsburgh for my ex-neighbour, Ab McDonald.  Pittsburgh had gotten Ab from The Blackhawks in the Expansion Draft, in 1967.
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JoeC
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« Reply #452 on: March 29, 2018, 08:14:38 AM »

Robb, Your personal outdoor rink sounds fabulous.

20 miles up the Hudson River from NYC, we didn't have great ice. Although, in the coldest winters, people actually drove their cars across the Hudson (at its widest point, the "Tappan Zee") where the current bridges are built.

We played as kids on a very large pond where, at the deepest end, you could see open water (with no boards, we lost many pucks to a watery grave). Who was gonna skate hard after them toward thin, or no, ice? We used two logs we pulled out of nearby woods for "goals.'  Hit the log, you scored -- so had to keep puck on the ice. No slap shots.

We were young teens. A group of four French-Canadian men often joined us (two on each of our "sides") and they took no prisoners. Though probably 10 years older than us, we got the same checks as they gave themselves and, our poor young "goalies," well, their knees were shaking so bad ... The good thing was these guys brought actual nets. What I remember most was how fast they could skate. Like we were rooted in cement.
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Robb_K
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« Reply #453 on: March 29, 2018, 11:00:16 AM »

20 miles up the Hudson River from NYC, we didn't have great ice. Although, in the coldest winters, people actually drove their cars across the Hudson (at its widest point, the "Tappan Zee") where the current bridges are built.
We played as kids on a very large pond where, at the deepest end, you could see open water (with no boards, we lost many pucks to a watery grave). Who was gonna skate hard after them toward thin, or no, ice? We used two logs we pulled out of nearby woods for "goals.'  Hit the log, you scored -- so had to keep puck on the ice. No slap shots.
We were young teens. A group of four French-Canadian men often joined us (two on each of our "sides") and they took no prisoners. Though probably 10 years older than us, we got the same checks as they gave themselves and, our poor young "goalies," well, their knees were shaking so bad ... The good thing was these guys brought actual nets. What I remember most was how fast they could skate. Like we were rooted in cement.
Wow! playing against adults 1o years older, who played like they were in an organized adult league.  That is what I call gutsy, and dedicated to playing hockey.  Did they give you any pointers on how to improve your game (like shooting, passing, using leverage on your checks, etc.  and show you set offensive plays?
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bklynmike101
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« Reply #454 on: March 29, 2018, 11:14:39 AM »

I was and remain the proud owner of a gen-u-ine Dave Balon Montreal Canadians hockey stick obtained directly from Balon at MSG circa 1967-8. Not having access to ice, not to mention barely being able to stand up on ice skates, the stick was used as my stick of choice (also my only stick) in our "field hockey" endeavors played on CONCRETE.  Angry Needless to say, the stick is in something less than pristine condition, especially the taped together shards of wood that constitute the blade. 

I also had a Tony Hrkac autographed picture that he signed for me at a Milwaukee Admirals (IHL) game in '96. Unfortunately, I can't seem to find it.

Maybe I should look for a Lou Angotti model?   
Who made the Dave Bacon stick?  Lou Angotti was once traded by St. Louis to Pittsburgh for my ex-neighbour, Ab McDonald.  Pittsburgh had gotten Ab from The Blackhawks in the Expansion Draft, in 1967.

Who made it? Hm... Well, it says "Pattern Made". There is also a marking "McNeise's - Montreal, Canada.  Does that mean anything to you? Balon's uniform number - 20 - is also stamped on it.

I remember Ab McDonald. Looking up Hrkac, it appears he was one of those guys who couldn't get enough. Retired after '04-'05, back with the (now AHL) Milwaukee Admirals at age 39. Then, came back and played a few games in '08-'09 and '09-'10 for the AHL Houston Aeros, finishing up at age 43+. Don't think that was for the big bucks  Grin. Gotta  love that.
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JoeC
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« Reply #455 on: March 29, 2018, 11:56:49 AM »

20 miles up the Hudson River from NYC, we didn't have great ice. Although, in the coldest winters, people actually drove their cars across the Hudson (at its widest point, the "Tappan Zee") where the current bridges are built.
We played as kids on a very large pond where, at the deepest end, you could see open water (with no boards, we lost many pucks to a watery grave). Who was gonna skate hard after them toward thin, or no, ice? We used two logs we pulled out of nearby woods for "goals.'  Hit the log, you scored -- so had to keep puck on the ice. No slap shots.
We were young teens. A group of four French-Canadian men often joined us (two on each of our "sides") and they took no prisoners. Though probably 10 years older than us, we got the same checks as they gave themselves and, our poor young "goalies," well, their knees were shaking so bad ... The good thing was these guys brought actual nets. What I remember most was how fast they could skate. Like we were rooted in cement.
Wow! playing against adults 1o years older, who played like they were in an organized adult league.  That is what I call gutsy, and dedicated to playing hockey.  Did they give you any pointers on how to improve your game (like shooting, passing, using leverage on your checks, etc.  and show you set offensive plays?

I wish I could say they did (coach us) but we were just fodder to fill out a reasonable "game" for them. I think the gap was WAY too large for them to take the time to try to bring our skills, such as they were, up to snuff. I will say they were kind enough NOT to take verbal or physical punitive measures when we missed an easy pass or failed to hit them in stride. They just looked sort of disgusted, like how could we be that bad at 14 or whatever age we were.
« Last Edit: March 29, 2018, 12:02:05 PM by JoeC » Logged
Robb_K
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« Reply #456 on: March 29, 2018, 12:06:17 PM »

I was and remain the proud owner of a gen-u-ine Dave Balon Montreal Canadians hockey stick obtained directly from Balon at MSG circa 1967-8. Not having access to ice, not to mention barely being able to stand up on ice skates, the stick was used as my stick of choice (also my only stick) in our "field hockey" endeavors played on CONCRETE.  Angry Needless to say, the stick is in something less than pristine condition, especially the taped together shards of wood that constitute the blade. 
Who made it? it says "Pattern Made". There is also a marking "McNeise's - Montreal, Canada.  Does that mean anything to you?

Yes Ozias McNiese was the inventor of major improvements to hockey sticks during the 1910s.  He started a sporting goods store in Montreal, and manufactured hockey sticks.  His company was still making sticks till the beginning of the 1960s.  I don't remember seeing them after that.

I remember Tony Hrcac well.  He was a super fast skater.  He was a US collage star.  I think he won The Hobey Baker award, as the most valuable (top) player in USA colleges his senior year.  The St. Louis Blues drafted him, and ballyhooed him as much as Orr got.  But, he flopped.  He didn't play any defence, and didn't score enough to make up for that big deficiency in his game.
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JoeC
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« Reply #457 on: March 29, 2018, 12:11:37 PM »

Robb, you answered a ton of questions from me about Canada and hockey some time ago. Had another one.

In the US, with football, the general wisdom is that if you want speedy running backs, wide receivers or defensive backs, go first to Florida (or Texas or Southern California) to recruit. If you want beefy lineman, the Midwest is where to look first. These are generalizations and stereotypes but ... more than a hint of truth in them, for whatever reasons!

Was wondering if the same holds true for hockey players in Canada. For example, is speed and stick handling ability thought to be more prevalent among Quebec Juniors? Other skills or physical attributes believed to be more likely to be found on the Prairies? You get my drift.
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Robb_K
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« Reply #458 on: March 29, 2018, 12:17:58 PM »

Wow! playing against adults 1o years older, who played like they were in an organized adult league.  That is what I call gutsy, and dedicated to playing hockey.  Did they give you any pointers on how to improve your game (like shooting, passing, using leverage on your checks, etc.  and show you set offensive plays?
I wish I could say they did (coach us) but we were just fodder to fill out a reasonable "game" for them. I think the gap was WAY too large for them to take the time to try to bring our skills, such as they were, up to snuff. I will say they were kind enough NOT to take verbal or physical punitive measures when we missed an easy pass or failed to hit them in stride. They just looked sort of disgusted, like how could we be that bad at 14 or whatever age we were.
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Too bad.  They weren't very nice people.  It would have made their own experience playing with you more enjoyable, if you played better.  I've rarely experienced that kind of behaviour.  MOST older and better players in pick up games gave us younger, still learning players tips on how to improve our games - especially if they played on our team.  Too bad for you boys.  They could have made your experience much more enjoyable, at no cost to them (rather would have made their experience better, as well).  Some people are just not very friendly.  If they really hated Anglophones so much, why would they play with you, and be fair about splitting themselves to make fair teams???  It makes no sense.  Most of the franchise I've met and played with and against were very nice.  Hockey brings people together, rather than keeps them apart.  Of course, I got along well with them because I had taken French in school.  They appreciated that, as MOST Winnipeggers took Russian or German as their foreign language (because they were of Ukrainian or German heritage.  But, I felt it was important to be able to communicate with ALL my countrymen, not just 2/3 of them.
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JoeC
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« Reply #459 on: March 29, 2018, 01:02:11 PM »

I don't know that we felt much, if any, offense from these guys. I'm sure it started with maybe four of us younger American guys and their four, both with hockey sticks and skates. Skating on different parts of this pond near Pearl River, NY. Not enough guys in either group to really "play," but ... combined, you could have a little game. And, I guess they were happy enough with us --- despite the age and skill gap - to bring their nets the next Saturday, which really "upped" the quality of the game. So much so that, on subsequent weekends, other skaters tried to join the proceedings. I'm sure actual hockey nets on an American pond in the NYC suburbs was a heretofore unseen sight!

Given the year, I'm sure these Canadians were iron workers, working on the Tappan Zee Bridge, which was being built and painted. I'd make a fair guess, too, that although I heard them speak French among themselves, they were off an Indian Reservation up on the St. Lawrence. Why they weren't more "friendly," who knows? Maybe they didn't speak much English? Or, more likely, they were just out for some weekend exercise over the 4-6 weeks we had some ice to play hockey on. I'm sure they didn't see any other role for themselves.

Any First Nation (is that the correct name) people make names for themselves in the NHL?
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Robb_K
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« Reply #460 on: March 29, 2018, 01:05:29 PM »

In US football, if you want speedy RBs, WRs or DBs, go to Florida, Texas or South. Calif.)-beefy lineman, Midwest. Is that true of hockey players in Canada? Is speed and stick handling ability more prevalent among Quebec Juniors? Other skills or physical attributes more likely to be found on the Prairies?
There ARE regional differences in hockey skills in Canada. Northern, rural Quebec has longer, colder winters than most of the organized hockey feeder areas of the country (where most of the population lives in The South, within 150 miles of The US border. Also, most kids in rural North Quebec grew up on farms, fairly far from one another.  So, when the kids played Bandy, they rarely had enough players to man all positions (6 skaters and one goaltender from 1800s all the way to the 1920s). They usually didn't have goalies-put almost all emphasis on offence, as playing defence was difficult, often useless. So offensive skills were emphasized, and high scoring was the norm. So, most highly-skilled, best offensive forwards usually came from N. Quebec (Quebec City, Trois Rivieres, Chicoutimi). Later, when organized Junior, Senior and pro leagues took over, goaltending became super important, as goaltenders were generally left hung out to dry, because of the tradition of not emphasizing defence.  That gave the goalies terrific practise at needing to make ridiculous acrobatic reflex saves, due to getting no help. Goaltending flowered for basic survival. Even today, the best goalies from North America come from Northern Quebec, as the best in Europe come from Finland (because Finns emphasize defence less than The Russians, Czechs, Slovaks, Swiss & free-skating Swedes. Big, strong defencemen are a staple in The WHL (Western Provinces), especially The Prairie Provinces, because most of the defencemen were raised on farms, and are strong from carrying hay bales and potato sacks (like Gordie Howe-a forward, but built like a D-man). Northern Ontario (farming and mining country also produced big and strong players -so many of the best defencemen came from there. Quebec, in general had players well trained in offensive skills, because of the game's start in The North, and many farmer families moved south to bigger towns and cities. Warm B.C. never developed many quality NHL players. The Maritimes never had high-quality leagues or hockey traditions, followed Quebec, but lower quality.
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Robb_K
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« Reply #461 on: March 29, 2018, 01:33:39 PM »

Any First Nation (is that the correct name) people make names for themselves in the NHL?
Yes, "First Nation" is the Canadian equivalent to "Native American" for USA indigenous peoples.  There have been a fair amount of First Nation NHLers.

Walter Tkazcuk (Ojibway), Jonathan Cheechoo (Cree), George Armstrong (Ojibway), Reggie Leach (Ojibway). Jim Nielson, Ted Nolan (Ojibway), Fred Sasakamoose (Cree), Jordan Tootoo (Inuit), Gino Odjick (Algonquin), Denis Lambert (Ojibway), Mike Peluso (Metis), Henry Boucha (Cree), Ted Hodgeson (Cree), Bobby Simpson (Mohawk), Sandy MCarthy (Mi'kmaq), Harry York (Cree), Chris Simon (Ojibway), Wayne King (Ojibway), Chad Denny (Mi'kmaq), Carey Price (Ulkatcho), Everett Sanipass (Mi'kmaq), Blair Atcheynum (Cree)

T.J. Oshie (Ojibway) (USA - Minnesota)

These are most of the full-blooded Native North Americans.  Lots more were partial, including Grant Fuhr, Shane Corson, Theo Fleury, Stu Grimson, Gerald Diduk, Bryan Trottier,
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JoeC
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« Reply #462 on: March 29, 2018, 04:36:37 PM »

Robb, TY for both replies.

Saw an article naming "The Best Hockey Town In All Of Canada." Based on NHL players born/raised there, on a per capita population basis.

Winner is Fort William/Thunder Bay. "This place is special. Firstly, it has simply produced an astounding number of NHL players for a city whose population has remained at about 100,000 residents since the 60s. The region of Thunder Bay has regularly churned out at least one NHL player (often more) for every 15,000 residents, a remarkable feat. Today’s NHL features Thunder Bay family connections like the four Staal brothers, two Pyatt brothers and the Chorneys (current NHLer Taylor and father Marc); oldtimers like all-time great Alex Delvecchio and all-stars Gus Bodnar and Charlie Simmer, are just a few of Thunder Bay’s native sons that went on to don NHL sweaters."

Finishing second was Sudbury. "Secondly, the town most famous for its mines (though it should be for its hockey players). Forget about the huge number of players that this town has consistently churned out, certainly rivaling our champion Thunder Bay in this regard. There’s something in the water there (heavy metal, maybe?) that gives its native sons a certain unique quality. Whether it’s Eddie Shack (the “Nose”), Mike Foligno (the “Leap”), Ron Duguay (the “Hair”), or Todd Bertuzzi (let’s not go there), these guys have personality. Al Arbour wore glasses on the ice, for goodness sake. And we can’t talk about Sudbury without mentioning the heartache that the cities of Toronto and Vancouver have suffered under the helm of Sudbury-born Randy Carlyle and Mike Gillis. The NHL would not be the NHL without the Nickel City."

Also saw a 2016 article that said prospects born/raised in Quebec have alarmingly dwindled in the last several decades. Didn't really give a reason. Think they mentioned that only three players from Quebec were on the 2016 Canadian World Cup team --- Bergeron, Vlasic and Corey Crawford. Last Quebecer taken #1 in the draft was LeCavalier, back in 1998. Only 14 players from the QMJHL were taken in the draft in 2016.
« Last Edit: March 29, 2018, 04:47:49 PM by JoeC » Logged
doctordoowop
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« Reply #463 on: March 29, 2018, 05:30:18 PM »

Just to see Barclay  center I went to  Hawks-Islanders game last  Sat nite.   Had seat rite behind Hawk bench.   It is a hoop arena-NY moving to new arena in Elmont soon.

Those guys are "HUGE". Islanders have a guy who must be 6-8.
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Robb_K
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« Reply #464 on: March 29, 2018, 06:02:48 PM »

"The Best Hockey Town In All Of Canada." Based on NHL players born/raised there, on a per capita population basis.
Thunder Bay- produced an astounding number of NHL players for a city with about 100,000 residents since the 60s. The region of Thunder Bay has regularly churned out at least one NHL player for every 15,000 residents. Todays NHL features The Staal brothers, Pyatt brothers and the Chorneys; oldtimers like Alex Delvecchio, Gus Bodnar and Charlie Simmer.
Second was Sudbury "Secondly, the town most famous for its mines (though it should be for its hockey players). Eddie Shack, Mike Foligno, Ron Duguay, & Todd Bertuzzi, Al Arbour, Randy Carlyle & Mike Gillis.

As Al Arbour always said:  "There's nothing for a kid to do in Sudbury but play hockey!"  Kirkland Lake. North Bay and Timmins in Northern Ontario were other hockey hotbeds.  Mining towns were as good for young hockey players as the farms.  Thetford Mines in Quebec was a good one.  When I was young, Thunder Bay was just a bay.  The city was formed by two smaller cities joining together.  They were Fort William and Port Arthur.  But, yes, lots of hockey players came from both towns.  In Manitoba, farming towns like Brandon and Flin Flon churned out a lot of great players.  In Saskatchewan, Moosejaw, North Battleford, Estevan, Prince Albert, Swift Current, Humboldt, and Weyburn were where the players came from.  In Alberta, Lethbridge, Medicine Hat, and Red Deer; and in Ontario, other than the aforementioned towns, they also came from Kenora, Sault Sainte Marie, Oshawa, Parry Sound, Kingston, Sarnia, Barrie, Peterborough, Owen Sound, St. Catherines, and Belleville, near The Great Lakes.
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bklynmike101
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« Reply #465 on: March 30, 2018, 03:15:25 PM »

Any First Nation (is that the correct name) people make names for themselves in the NHL?
Yes, "First Nation" is the Canadian equivalent to "Native American" for USA indigenous peoples.  There have been a fair amount of First Nation NHLers.

Walter Tkazcuk (Ojibway), Jonathan Cheechoo (Cree), George Armstrong (Ojibway), Reggie Leach (Ojibway). Jim Nielson, Ted Nolan (Ojibway), Fred Sasakamoose (Cree), Jordan Tootoo (Inuit), Gino Odjick (Algonquin), Denis Lambert (Ojibway), Mike Peluso (Metis), Henry Boucha (Cree), Ted Hodgeson (Cree), Bobby Simpson (Mohawk), Sandy MCarthy (Mi'kmaq), Harry York (Cree), Chris Simon (Ojibway), Wayne King (Ojibway), Chad Denny (Mi'kmaq), Carey Price (Ulkatcho), Everett Sanipass (Mi'kmaq), Blair Atcheynum (Cree)

T.J. Oshie (Ojibway) (USA - Minnesota)

These are most of the full-blooded Native North Americans.  Lots more were partial, including Grant Fuhr, Shane Corson, Theo Fleury, Stu Grimson, Gerald Diduk, Bryan Trottier,

Robb, fascinating. I had no idea that these guys, including a guy I loved, Tkazcuk, he of the Ukrainian surname, were "First Nation" people, let alone "full-blooded".

The thing about Hrkac that was most memorable to me was his incredibly blonde hair. In looking up his stats, it's easy to see that he was reasonably accomplished offensively, so that his up and down career could quite logically be explained by defensive deficiencies. Apparently he served a coach of one Concordia University in Wisconsin, compiling the unenviable record of  10-109-10! Ouch! Tongue 
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JoeC
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« Reply #466 on: March 30, 2018, 03:53:44 PM »

The Maritimes never had high-quality leagues or hockey traditions, followed Quebec, but lower quality.

Seems like Nova Scotia may not have had quantity, but of all the smaller provinces, really had some high quality players. Sidney Crosby, Lowell and Parker McDonald, Al McNeil, Al McInnis, Mike McPhee, Glenn Murray, Bobby Smith. You'd be right, though, in noting not many from the older era we focus on.

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Robb_K
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« Reply #467 on: March 30, 2018, 04:52:13 PM »

Yes, "First Nation" is the Canadian equivalent to "Native American" for USA indigenous peoples.  There have been a fair amount of First Nation NHLers.
Walter Tkazcuk (Ojibway), Jonathan Cheechoo (Cree), George Armstrong (Ojibway), Reggie Leach (Ojibway). Jim Nielson, Ted Nolan (Ojibway), Fred Sasakamoose (Cree), Jordan Tootoo (Inuit), Gino Odjick (Algonquin), Denis Lambert (Ojibway), Mike Peluso (Metis), Henry Boucha (Cree), Ted Hodgeson (Cree), Bobby Simpson (Mohawk), Sandy MCarthy (Mi'kmaq), Harry York (Cree), Chris Simon (Ojibway), Wayne King (Ojibway), Chad Denny (Mi'kmaq), Carey Price (Ulkatcho), Everett Sanipass (Mi'kmaq), Blair Atcheynum (Cree)
T.J. Oshie (Ojibway) (USA - Minnesota)
Robb, fascinating. I had no idea that these guys, including a guy I loved, Tkazcuk, he of the Ukrainian surname, were "First Nation" people, let alone "full-blooded".

Looking again at a photo of Walt, I can see that my memories were exaggerated.  I think he must have been, at most, only half, but, probably is closer to one quarter Native Canadian. I remember people calling him "Chief".  So, I must have gotten him confused with George Armstrong or Jim Nielson, who WERE full-blooded, and were also called "Chief".  They used to call every player who had ANY Indian blood, "Chief", as a joke.  I forgot a couple: Canadien/Blue Jimmy Roberts, and Blue Jamie Rivers were 3/4 or more.  T.J. Oshie's father is a full-blood Ojibway, his mother was half Caucasian.  Yet, T.J. looks 100% Caucasian. 
« Last Edit: March 30, 2018, 05:19:23 PM by Robb_K » Logged

Robb_K
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« Reply #468 on: March 31, 2018, 11:41:51 AM »

The Maritimes never had high-quality leagues or hockey traditions, followed Quebec, but lower quality.
Seems like Nova Scotia may not have had quantity, but of all the smaller provinces, really had some high quality players. Sidney Crosby, Lowell and Parker McDonald, Al McNeil, Al McInnis, Mike McPhee, Glenn Murray, Bobby Smith. You'd be right, though, in noting not many from the older era we focus on.

The calibre of Junior A hockey opportunities has increased tremendously for Nova Scotia and New Brunswick since the start of the 1980s, when they got a couple teams each in The Quebec Major Junior Hockey League.  That has opened up a higher level of training for many of hose provinces' best midget and AAA players.  Before that, a handful of individual high-achieving players had to find guest homes in Quebec, and play for QMJHL teams there. That situation still exists for Canadian boys who live far away from cities with teams in the higher level Midget and Junior leagues.  That's what I would have done when my parents moved to USA.  I would have had to stay with my uncle and aunt in West Kildonan, Manitoba, if I had wanted to play for The Winnipeg Rangers (the team that owned my rights).  There was no decently high level Junior league in The Chicago Metro Area in 1963.
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bklynmike101
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« Reply #469 on: March 31, 2018, 01:55:31 PM »

The Maritimes never had high-quality leagues or hockey traditions, followed Quebec, but lower quality.
Seems like Nova Scotia may not have had quantity, but of all the smaller provinces, really had some high quality players. Sidney Crosby, Lowell and Parker McDonald, Al McNeil, Al McInnis, Mike McPhee, Glenn Murray, Bobby Smith. You'd be right, though, in noting not many from the older era we focus on.

The calibre of Junior A hockey opportunities has increased tremendously for Nova Scotia and New Brunswick since the start of the 1980s, when they got a couple teams each in The Quebec Major Junior Hockey League.  That has opened up a higher level of training for many of hose provinces' best midget and AAA players.  Before that, a handful of individual high-achieving players had to find guest homes in Quebec, and play for QMJHL teams there. That situation still exists for Canadian boys who live far away from cities with teams in the higher level Midget and Junior leagues.  That's what I would have done when my parents moved to USA.  I would have had to stay with my uncle and aunt in West Kildonan, Manitoba, if I had wanted to play for The Winnipeg Rangers (the team that owned my rights).  There was no decently high level Junior league in The Chicago Metro Area in 1963.

And one Gerard Gallant hailed from "lonely" PEI, population 12 Roll Eyes, that I had the pleasure of vacationing in 1 1/2 years back (great place for a vacation). Of course, Gallant is currently enjoying unexpected success with Vegas in the NHL.   
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JoeC
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« Reply #470 on: March 31, 2018, 03:21:18 PM »

Mike, I envy your vacation there. Forbes Kennedy was raised there too.

Only place I've ever been on the Canadian Atlantic Coast was Gander, Newfoundland. Back in 1954, before commercial jet aircraft, to fly from Germany to New York, you had to make two stops for refueling and food. The propeller aircraft stopped first in Shannon, Ireland then made the transatlantic crossing to Gander, where you ate dinner at the airport cafeteria while the plane was taking on the fuel needed to get to NYC.

That was at least a 12 hour trip, in a very hot plane. People were throwing up on all legs of the trip, especially on landings. I was spared from that, though a little nauseous. All they had to eat in Newfoundland was Cod, and I hate it to this day. Highlight, from my window seat, was seeing icebergs in the North Atlantic in June. The propeller drone was also loud as hell. Why I rarely complain about lengthy air travel these days.

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Robb_K
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« Reply #471 on: March 31, 2018, 03:27:46 PM »

Mike, I envy your vacation there. Forbes Kennedy was raised there too.
Only place I've ever been on the Canadian Atlantic Coast was Gander, Newfoundland. Back in 1954, before commercial jet aircraft, to fly from Germany to New York, you had to make two stops for refueling and food. The propeller aircraft stopped first in Shannon, Ireland then made the transatlantic crossing to Gander, where you ate dinner at the airport cafeteria while the plane was taking on the fuel needed to get to NYC.
That was at least a 12 hour trip, in a very hot plane. People were throwing up on all legs of the trip, especially on landings. I was spared from that, though a little nauseous. All they had to eat in Newfoundland was Cod, and I hate it to this day. Highlight, from my window seat, was seeing icebergs in the North Atlantic in June. The propeller drone was also loud as hell. Why I rarely complain about lengthy air travel these days.
I've stopped at Gander many times.  I pass over Newfoundland, a bit of Labrador, southern Greenland and Iceland (and assorted icebergs) 2 to 4 times each year.
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Robb_K
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« Reply #472 on: March 31, 2018, 03:37:04 PM »

The best NHL players from P.E.I. have been:
Brad Richards, Rick Vaive, Errol Thompson, Bob MacMillan and Billy MacMillan, Al MacAdam, Gerard Gallant, Forbes Kennedy, Kevin Devine, Bobby Whitlock, Dave Cameron and goalie, Gary Simmons.  None have been big stars.  All have been fairly recent, other than Forbes Kennedy.  The Maritime leagues were notary high quality competition, nor coaching quality.  Individuals had to migrate to Quebec to get high-level training.  Charlottetown had a team in The QMJHL for awhile.
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bklynmike101
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« Reply #473 on: April 01, 2018, 12:38:59 AM »

Robb,

Meant to thank you for the info on McNiese - quite interesting. I had no idea what that stamping meant and found very little info on Google. However, I did see an  EBay ad for a mid-60's era stick from one of the prominent Canadians - maybe Beliveau - for which the seller noted a McNiese stamping - something like "McNiese - West Montreal, Canada" as I recall.

Loved seeing your list of PEI native hockey player names, many of which I recognize and had not heard or thought about in years. Rick Vaive was a high goal scorer - 40-50+ per year in his prime, a pretty decent sized star for a while.  Gary Simmons, a goalie, and anything but a star at the NHL level, played for the short-lived California Golden Seals, who then became the Cleveland Barons for an even shorter time, before joining the ranks of the defunct. At a NY Rangers game vs. the aforementioned Barons, I came the closest I ever came to losing my head as a result of a wayward puck (best seats I ever had for a hockey game).  Grin  Ducked just in time.   

Joe,

We wanted to get to Newfoundland, but fell short, spending most of our limited time and budget in PEI with a day trip down to Nova Scotia. I have seen icebergs from the air a few times flying the polar route. 
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doctordoowop
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« Reply #474 on: April 01, 2018, 01:48:36 AM »

Robb--i heard  that you can recite  every  leader  in points, rebounds, and  assists   in the NBA  from 1950 to  2017.  For good measure you can give the ethnicity and birthplace of every  leader. Is that true? Grin Grin Grin Grin

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JoeC
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« Reply #475 on: April 01, 2018, 06:50:57 PM »

Forbes Kennedy. 5'8, 150. Pound for pound, was anyone tougher? Four fights and a punched linesman.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V-s6uT16S8A
« Last Edit: April 01, 2018, 06:53:08 PM by JoeC » Logged
Robb_K
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« Reply #476 on: April 01, 2018, 06:51:56 PM »

Robb--i heard  that you can recite  every  leader  in points, rebounds, and  assists   in the NBA  from 1950 to  2017.  For good measure you can give the ethnicity and birthplace of every  leader. Is that true? Grin Grin Grin Grin
I admit that I AM a "Rain Man" type, complete with photographic memory, when it comes to sports statistics (Hockey(1890s-1972), Baseball(1890s-1966) and record information (1940s-1970), based on having the mild form of Asbergers' Syndrome (autism) - serious "collectors' syndrome".  But, I know very little about pro basketball, and nothing about US college basketball, just as I know virtually nothing about US college football, boxing, soccer, etc., having been raised in Canada, and not following those sports after moving to USA.  I did follow The NFL some after moving to Chicago, as I was a Winnipeg Blue Bomber fan of The CFL, and our greatest coach, Minnesotan, Bud Grant, coached The Vikings starting fairly early.  We got to see US TV, being so close to the border, so I was a Vikings fan (our closest NFL team) from 1961, when they started.  
I knew about Oscar Robertson, Bob Cousey, Bill Russell, George Mikan, Elgin Baylor, as great players.  But very little else.  I don't know ANY NBA records.  But, I used to know virtually ALL the stats for hockey, and just about all baseball stats that were on the baseball cards from 1948-1965.

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Robb_K
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« Reply #477 on: April 01, 2018, 06:55:23 PM »

Forbes Kennedy. 5'8, 150. Pound for pound, was anyone tougher? Four fights and a punched linesman.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V-s6uT16S8A
I don't think there was anyone tougher pound for pound.  Maybe Ted Lindsey.  There were a LOT of really small fireballs in The Old NHL.  Reg Fleming was also very small and light.
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JoeC
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« Reply #478 on: April 01, 2018, 07:35:20 PM »

Forbes Kennedy. 5'8, 150. Pound for pound, was anyone tougher? Four fights and a punched linesman.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V-s6uT16S8A
I don't think there was anyone tougher pound for pound.  Maybe Ted Lindsey.  There were a LOT of really small fireballs in The Old NHL.  Reg Fleming was also very small and light.

Yeah, I always forget how small Terrible Ted was. He played so big! Also, in that YT clip of Forbes Kennedy's last NHL shift, the only one who got the better of Forbes was Pieface McKenzie. Another little scrapper. Kennedy was banned after that brawl, no? I mean, 38 minutes in penalties assessed plus punching the linesman?
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JoeC
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« Reply #479 on: April 01, 2018, 07:49:24 PM »

Just to see Barclay  center I went to  Hawks-Islanders game last  Sat nite.   Had seat rite behind Hawk bench.   It is a hoop arena-NY moving to new arena in Elmont soon.

Those guys are "HUGE". Islanders have a guy who must be 6-8.

What did you think of the place, Doc? Never been there. All I know it's built on the site where O'Malley wanted to relocate the Dodgers to from Ebbets Field. Or, at least that's what he said. Robt Moses nixed the plan and offered Flushing Meadows instead. Bye bye Dodgers.
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