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JoeC
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« on: August 27, 2019, 12:26:40 PM »

From the 1950/60s/70s:

1. Name the only player to ever hit a "walk off" Inside-The-Park Grand Slam? Happened in the 1950s.

2. Name the only player to hit two Inside-The-Park HRs in the same game, both off the same pitcher. Name the HoF pitcher as well. Happened in the early 70s in Minneapolis.

3. Player with the most hits in the 1950s. Fleet OF.

4. Player who hit the most HRs in the 1950s.

5. Player who made the last out of the 1953 season, therein losing the Triple Crown. American Leaguer who played his whole career with one team.

6. Pitcher with six straight 20 win seasons in the 50s.

7. Only player who was ROY, MVP, World Series MVP, All Star Game MVP. 1950s and 60s span.

8. Boston Red Sox OF who hit 35 HR and batted in 109 in a late 60s' season. Once rode Charlie Finley's mule at a pre-game stadium event (for a fee of course).

9. Only player who was active in MLB when Babe Ruth had his last AB and when Hank Aaron had his first. Obviously 1935 and 1954. Player was with a Chicago team for each event.  

10. Player with most consecutive World Series games with at least one hit. NYY outfielder.  
« Last Edit: August 27, 2019, 01:47:24 PM by JoeC » Logged
bklynmike101
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« Reply #1 on: August 28, 2019, 11:10:10 AM »

Wild guesses - no thinking involved:

3. Richie Ashburn?
4. Mantle?
5. Sounds like Al Rosen maybe
6. Spahn?
7. Frank Robinson?
8. Hawk Harrelson?
10. Hank Bauer?
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JoeC
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« Reply #2 on: August 28, 2019, 11:59:45 AM »

Mike,

You are correct on #3 (Richie Ashburn), #5 (Al Rosen), #7 (Frank Robinson), #8 (Hawk Harrelson), and #10 (Hank Bauer).

More clues on the remaining half of the 10 questions still unanswered:

#1. A lot of the old spacious ballparks lent themselves to Inside-The-Park HR opportunities. This Grand Slam, walk-off ITP HR was hit off the Cubs' Jim Brosnan in July 56 (not at Wrigley).
#2. The hitter was one of the most talented players ever to play the game and also very controversial in the 60s and 70s. Played for the White Sox when he hit the two ITP HRs. The HoF pitcher is now a TV color man.  
#4. Not Mantle, but played in NYC.
#6. Pitcher once started 3 times in the last 5 games of the season.
#9. Won the 1945 NL batting title. Almost spent his entire 20+ years with the Cubs. Was only 18 when he broke in the year before Ruth left the game.
« Last Edit: August 28, 2019, 12:15:55 PM by JoeC » Logged
Robb_K
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« Reply #3 on: August 28, 2019, 02:37:08 PM »

4. Willie Mays?
5. Al Rosen
6. Robin Roberts
9.  Phil Cavaretta, - and I didn't nead the batting title clue.  I remember him with The Cubs AND The Sox.
« Last Edit: August 28, 2019, 02:45:22 PM by Robb_K » Logged

JoeC
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« Reply #4 on: August 28, 2019, 04:21:22 PM »

4. Willie Mays?
5. Al Rosen
6. Robin Roberts
9.  Phil Cavaretta, - and I didn't nead the batting title clue.  I remember him with The Cubs AND The Sox.


Robb, Mike had already gotten credit for Al Rosen (#5).

As for your other answers:

Willie Mays is not the right player (so that eliminates Mantle and Mays).

Robin Roberts (#6) and Phil Cavaretta (#9) are both correct.  I had a 1954 or 1955 baseball card of Phil Cavarretta and he REALLY looked old. Even though he was only in his late 30s (he just had one of those "old" faces -- probably looked the same decades later).

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JoeC
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« Reply #5 on: August 28, 2019, 04:47:32 PM »

So, that just leaves #1, #2 and #4 unanswered.

#4. Eliminating Mays and Mantle oughta be clue enough with my already having said he played for a NYC team.

#2. Let me offer an "incident" from 1965 involving this GREAT offensive player:  A teammate (known as a racist bully) got into a fistfight with our guy which escalated to the point where he hit our man in the shoulder with a hard swing of his bat, resulting in the bat swinger being immediately released. The bat swinger got to tell his side of the story; our guy was sworn to silence under threat of a heavy fine. This resulted in our man being "blamed" for costing a white player his job. These two players later became friends.

This was just one of many incidents branding our guy a hothead/troublemaker. Had to wear a batting helmet in the OF to protect his skull from home crowd throwing hard objects (batteries were a favorite).

Signed in 1960 (age 18) for a $70,000 bonus (big $$ then).

#1. Here's the scene: Bottom of the 9th at Forbes Field on a late July day in 1956. Pirates trail the Cubs 8-5 but have the bases loaded with no outs.

Courtesy Pittsburgh Post-Gazette:

"Brosnan made one pitch, high and inside. xxx drove it against the light standard in left field. Jim King had backed up to make the catch but it was over his head. The ball bounced off the slanted side of the fencing and rolled along the cinder path to center field. Here came Hank Foiles, Bill Virdon and then Dick Cole, heading home and making it easily. Then came xxx into third. Bobby Bragan had his hands up-stretched to hold up his player (remember, no outs in the inning). The relay was coming in from Solly Drake. But around third came xxx. He made it just in front of the relay from Ernie Banks. He slid, missed the plate, then reached back to rest his hand on the rubber with the ninth run in a 9-8 victory as the crowd of 12,431 went goofy with excitement."

So, our man ran through the "stop" sign from his 3rd base coach. He did things like this often in the early years of his career. Manager did forgive the automatic $25 fine for ignoring a sign. Cubs and Brosnan VERY upset about the "showboating."

I never saw a game at Forbes. How could it have hit the "light standard" and not be a regular HR. Sounds like some strange ground rules at play. 
« Last Edit: August 28, 2019, 04:50:22 PM by JoeC » Logged
Robb_K
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« Reply #6 on: August 29, 2019, 01:35:20 AM »

4.  Duke Snider? 
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JoeC
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« Reply #7 on: August 29, 2019, 08:12:28 AM »

4.  Duke Snider? 
Right! I was surprised at it being Duke, although he did hit 40+ HRs in 5 straight seasons in the 50s. Pretty consistent with the slugging all through the decade. He hit 326 HR in the 1950s. Mays hit 250 (but did not play in 1950 or 1953). Mantle hit 280, but did not play in 1950. Duke may well have been the leader even if his fellow NY CFs had played those "missing" years.

Last clues on #1 and #2.

#1. Again. this feat was never duplicated before or after his July 1956 game. On the defensive side, player won 12 Gold Gloves and known best for his very strong throwing arm.

#2. Due to his controversial (at the time) "personality," he played for 6 major league teams -- he broke into the league in 1963 and retired after one forgettable year with the Oakland A's in 1977. Hit 351 HRs in his mostly NL career. As given in a previous clue, he performed the two inside-the-park homers in one game as a member of an AL team. Year for that was 1972.

HoF pitcher who gave up those two, modern-day record-setting ITP HRs won 287 games between 1970-92.  Born in Europe, raised in Garden Grove, Cal
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Robb_K
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« Reply #8 on: August 29, 2019, 10:49:34 AM »

4.  Duke Snider? 
Right! I was surprised at it being Duke, although he did hit 40+ HRs in 5 straight seasons in the 50s. Pretty consistent with the slugging all through the decade. He hit 326 HR in the 1950s. Mays hit 250 (but did not play in 1950 or 1953). Mantle hit 280, but did not play in 1950. Duke may well have been the leader even if his fellow NY CFs had played those "missing" years.

Last clues on #1 and #2.

#1. Again. this feat was never duplicated before or after his July 1956 game. On the defensive side, player won 12 Gold Gloves and known best for his very strong throwing arm.

#2. Due to his controversial (at the time) "personality," he played for 6 major league teams -- he broke into the league in 1963 and retired after one forgettable year with the Oakland A's in 1977. Hit 351 HRs in his mostly NL career. As given in a previous clue, he performed the two inside-the-park homers in one game as a member of an AL team. Year for that was 1972.

HoF pitcher who gave up those two, modern-day record-setting ITP HRs won 287 games between 1970-92.  Born in Europe, raised in Garden Grove, Cal

1.  Roberto Clemente

2.  Way too late for me to know.  I stopped watching after 1965.   Mays missed all of 1953, and most of 1952. (basically 2 seasons, plus was in the minors in 1950.  So, he essentially missed 3 seasons of the 1950s.  That's a LOT to make up. 
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bklynmike101
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« Reply #9 on: August 29, 2019, 11:41:48 AM »

1. Robb has to be right - has to be Clemente

2. Pitcher should be Jim Kaat, who I love as a color guy at age 80. Looks 60. Sounds 50. Great knowledge and stories. But the born in Europe clue throws me off. Always thought he was from the unlikely place of Zealand, Michigan (too many old baseball cards in my head). Anyway, I'll stick with Kitty Kaat .

As of the hitter, not a clue have I.....
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JoeC
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« Reply #10 on: August 29, 2019, 12:51:10 PM »

#1. Robb is correct that it was Roberto Clemente. He was often fined in his early years for being "uncoachable" on the basepaths. He ran though stop signs all the time, usually successfully. So, only a daring baserunner would've been able to accomplish this once in history feat.

#2. Pitcher is not Jim Kaat. Thought the foreign born would give it away. Think Minnesota Twins and Hall of Fame pitcher other than Kaat. Also pitched for Texas, Pittsburgh, the Indians, Angels and others. Really good curve ball.

Robb, I do recall you said you stopped watching before the 70s so you're forgiven on the pitcher. Let me add to the clues above by saying you might be able to converse with this Hall of Famer in a language other than English.

As to the player, let me add more clues:

- Called by many the best living player not yet in Cooperstown.  

- "Power, speed, smarts and style. These are the words that teammates and opponents used to describe xxx, one of baseball’s most exciting and enigmatic players. Angry, surly, disruptive narcissistic. These were labels that fans and the front office often applied to the sullen superstar.

For a solid decade during the 1960s and 1970s, (he) produced screaming line drives with his war-club of a bat—and he often had GMs waking up screaming due to his stubbornness and unpredictability. No one questions whether he was ahead of his time; he gave baseball an uncomfortable preview of the modern player. What his fans wonder, however, was how much this brooding, insubordinate slugger could have accomplished had he found his comfort zone for more than just a season or two."

Played for Phillies, White Sox, Cards, and A's.
« Last Edit: August 29, 2019, 12:54:59 PM by JoeC » Logged
bklynmike101
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« Reply #11 on: August 29, 2019, 01:46:19 PM »

OK so the pitcher is Bert Blyleven. Kaat is not in HOF anyway (though should be especially by today's standards). Somehow kept thinking that the timeframe was 1965 even though you had clearly stated otherwise.

Still stumped on our hot headed "hero".
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JoeC
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« Reply #12 on: August 29, 2019, 03:48:39 PM »

Blyleven, born in Zeist in The Netherlands, was indeed the pitcher. Can you imagine having TWO ITP HRs hit off you by the same guy in the same game.

I'll name the player tomorrow if Robb (or anyone else) still draws a blank. One last vague clue. As I recall, he went by two first names in his career. Both were nicknames, but stem from the same first name. I think it was one of those cases where as he got older he felt the original nickname was too "young" sounding.

« Last Edit: August 29, 2019, 03:53:25 PM by JoeC » Logged
Robb_K
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« Reply #13 on: August 30, 2019, 04:06:36 AM »

Blyleven, born in Zeist in The Netherlands, was indeed the pitcher. Can you imagine having TWO ITP HRs hit off you by the same guy in the same game.

I'll name the player tomorrow if Robb (or anyone else) still draws a blank. One last vague clue. As I recall, he went by two first names in his career. Both were nicknames, but stem from the same first name. I think it was one of those cases where as he got older he felt the original nickname was too "young" sounding.

2.  Richie Allen.  I don't know what he changed his name to when he "grew up" and didn't want a "kiddy" diminutive anymore, as I wasn't following baseball then, and wasn't in USA more than a couple weeks each year during the 1970s and 1980s.  I do remember Blyleven.  What a nice name.  It means "happy life".  I do like Zeist as a town, too. 
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JoeC
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« Reply #14 on: August 30, 2019, 07:40:14 AM »

Correct. Richie changed his name to Dick Allen at some point, and that's what he has gone by ever since.

I think Dick is favored to finally make the Hall of Fame as a Veterans Committee selection either in 2020 or 2021. Arguably his best season was the same year he hit the two inside-the-partk HRs in the same game (which would be 1972). He was playing that year for the White Sox and hit .308, with 37 HR and 113 RBI.

His high for HRs was 40 for the Phillies in 1966. He had 201 hits in his rookie season (1964), again for the Phils. Hit 33 HRs in the "pitchers year" of 1968.
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bklynmike101
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« Reply #15 on: August 30, 2019, 11:32:56 AM »

I remember a story (I think) about Richie Dick Allen that he hurt his hand changing a burnt out headlight on his car after which he wasn't quite the same hitter. I recall contemporaneously thinking - notwithstanding the fact that MLB salaries then were a far cry from what they are now - how odd that a player of his stature would change his own headlight. In any event, I hope he has found peace in his later years. In his prime, he sure could hit - both average and power.
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JoeC
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« Reply #16 on: August 30, 2019, 01:48:45 PM »

I remember a story (I think) about Richie Dick Allen that he hurt his hand changing a burnt out headlight on his car after which he wasn't quite the same hitter. I recall contemporaneously thinking - notwithstanding the fact that MLB salaries then were a far cry from what they are now - how odd that a player of his stature would change his own headlight. In any event, I hope he has found peace in his later years. In his prime, he sure could hit - both average and power.
Interesting story, Mike. Surely would never happen today!

BTW, the Phillies teammate who got into a fistfight with and ended up slugging Richie with his Louisville Slugger was Frank Thomas. Nice to see no grudges were held! I always thought Thomas was very underrated with the Pirates in the 1950s. Hit 34 HR for the original NY Mets in 1962. He's still with us at age 90.
« Last Edit: August 30, 2019, 01:52:20 PM by JoeC » Logged
bklynmike101
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« Reply #17 on: August 31, 2019, 01:45:57 PM »

Joe,

As an original NY Met fan from spring training '62, The first Frank Thomas was one of my fav's as he hit something like 34 Hrs in his first fully year with the wobbly Mets when he arrived. He is still occasionally a guest at  card shows.

The Wiki article on Dick Allen  states "Dick Allen sang professionally in a high, delicate tenor. The tone and texture of his voice has drawn comparisons to Harptones' lead singer Willie Winfield.[18] During Allen's time with the Sixties-era Phillies, he sang lead with a doo-wop group called The Ebonistics."

Who knew? Dick Allen and Willie Winfield? I don't know about that. So Allen was in the mold of Lee Maye and Mudcat Grant.
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doctordoowop
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« Reply #18 on: August 31, 2019, 10:20:16 PM »

Without  looking  at  prior  answers

1-Mays

2-Minoso-Pascual

3-Ashburn

4-Duke

5-Rosen or Vernon

6-Clemente

7-Jensen

8-Cavaretta

9-Bauer
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doctordoowop
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« Reply #19 on: August 31, 2019, 10:27:02 PM »

Dick-"Echoes of November"--nice.  The  writers called him Richie--he always liked Dick.Member his bro-Hank

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JoeC
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« Reply #20 on: September 01, 2019, 07:28:30 AM »

Joe,

As an original NY Met fan from spring training '62, The first Frank Thomas was one of my fav's as he hit something like 34 Hrs in his first fully year with the wobbly Mets when he arrived. He is still occasionally a guest at  card shows.

The Wiki article on Dick Allen  states "Dick Allen sang professionally in a high, delicate tenor. The tone and texture of his voice has drawn comparisons to Harptones' lead singer Willie Winfield.[18] During Allen's time with the Sixties-era Phillies, he sang lead with a doo-wop group called The Ebonistics."

Who knew? Dick Allen and Willie Winfield? I don't know about that. So Allen was in the mold of Lee Maye and Mudcat Grant.

Mike, thanks for that! The guy was truly a 6 tool player! Richie was from the Pittsburgh area which, as we all know, was a real doowop hotbed!
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JoeC
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« Reply #21 on: September 01, 2019, 07:34:32 AM »

Dick-"Echoes of November"--nice.  The  writers called him Richie--he always liked Dick.Member his bro-Hank

I had forgotten Hank Allen. Thanks for the reminder.

And, you did well on the original quiz. I only got Ashburn, Frank Robby and Robin Roberts when I first saw the questions.
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doctordoowop
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« Reply #22 on: September 01, 2019, 03:00:35 PM »

I was in Philly  then-recall  he was  from  much closer  to Philly  than Pittsburgh.
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JoeC
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« Reply #23 on: September 01, 2019, 04:00:28 PM »

I was in Philly  then-recall  he was  from  much closer  to Philly  than Pittsburgh.
Ricjhie was from Wampum, PA which is actually about as far west in Pennsylvania as you can go -- not very far from the Ohio border. Maybe 10-15 miles from where Joe Namath grew up in Beaver Falls.

From JockBio (what a source!): "Wampum was a small working-class town less than an hour away from Pittsburgh. It had begun as a trading post, hence its name. The Allens were one of the only African American families in Wampum, but Dick, or “Dickie” as his friends and family called him, remembers the town as being racially tolerant for that era."
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