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Author Topic: Eddie Robinson Dies  (Read 148 times)
JoeC
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« on: October 06, 2021, 03:46:51 PM »

At age 100. Was the oldest living MLB player.

Eddie played from 1942-57 (losing 3 years to WWII). He was, as they say, "well traveled," playing for I think seven different AL teams. Best years were with the White Sox in 1951-52, and the A's in 1953. Power hitting 1B, a 4x All Star who later also was the Braves and Rangers GM.

He was one of the first players I became aware of following the White Sox when I was 7-8 years old. Then, I saw a lot more of him when he was a NYY from 1954-57. With the Yanks, he was in his mid to late 30s but in 1955, he still knocked in 42 runs on 36 hits. That's the kind of clutch hitter he was.

« Last Edit: October 06, 2021, 07:02:43 PM by JoeC » Logged
Robb_K
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« Reply #1 on: October 06, 2021, 08:10:01 PM »

At age 100. Was the oldest living MLB player.

Eddie played from 1942-57 (losing 3 years to WWII). He was, as they say, "well traveled," playing for I think seven different AL teams. Best years were with the White Sox in 1951-52, and the A's in 1953. Power hitting 1B, a 4x All Star who later also was the Braves and Rangers GM.

He was one of the first players I became aware of following the White Sox when I was 7-8 years old. Then, I saw a lot more of him when he was a NYY from 1954-57. With the Yanks, he was in his mid to late 30s but in 1955, he still knocked in 42 runs on 36 hits. That's the kind of clutch hitter he was.

I remember him well.  He was one of my favourite Sox players in 1951 and '52.  Hit hit a lot of homers considering that Comisky had far walls back then.  I was upset when he was traded to The A's for contact hitter, and former 2 time batting champ, Ferris Fain.  So, although they lost the homers, I thought, at least they'd have a sure .300 hitter for several years, but Fain only hit .256 and was traded away fairly soon.
« Last Edit: October 07, 2021, 01:08:45 PM by Robb_K » Logged

JoeC
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« Reply #2 on: October 07, 2021, 07:12:00 AM »

I was living in Germany when Eddie was traded to the A's. Didn't recall it was for Fain, another of my favorite players.

Eddie wasn't a high average hitter but, as I said, he always seemed to be "money" when he came up in a pressure situation late in a game. The Yankees always seemed to come up with those type players who were thought to washed up but always came through for them. Guys like Johnny Mize, Eddie, Enos Slaughter, Suitcase Simpson, Sal Maglie, Jim Konstanty, etc.
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bklynmike101
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« Reply #3 on: October 07, 2021, 11:35:44 AM »

I didn't learn about Eddie Robinson until "after the fact," i.e. he was long gone by the time I found baseball. But I quickly discovered him as I plunged into baseball history. he had quite a distinguished career overall, particularly in various front office capacities.  Likely a pretty smart dude in addition to being a more than solid player in his prime.
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