DOO-WOP/OLDIES FORUM - Welcome
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
December 04, 2021, 09:02:55 PM

Login with username, password and session length
Search:     Advanced search
ATTENTION:
NO COMMERCIAL SITES OR LINKS TO COMMERCIAL SITES ALLOWED ON THIS FORUM. IF YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL,
ie, CLOTHES, RECORDS, FURNTURE, ETC. DON'T DO IT HERE. THE URL WILL BE DELETED...  Mike Paladino
89635 Posts in 9815 Topics by 39 Members
Latest Member: doctordoowop
* Home Help Login Register
+  DOO-WOP/OLDIES FORUM - Welcome
|-+  OT - OFF TOPIC TOPICS :-)
| |-+  Off Topic Stuff
| | |-+  Red Kelley
« previous next »
Pages: [1] 2 Go Down Print
Author Topic: Red Kelley  (Read 10310 times)
bklynmike101
Hero Member
******
Posts: 1885


« on: May 03, 2019, 06:15:34 PM »

The great Red Kelley, who I remember as a prime defenseman for Leafs (later 1st Kings coach) passed away yesterday at age 91. By all accounts off the ice he was an absolute gentlemen and quite accomplished as well. RIP.
Logged
JoeC
Hero Member
******
Posts: 4398


« Reply #1 on: May 03, 2019, 09:15:22 PM »

Could not dislike Red even though he absolutely refused in live and play in NY (famously rejected a trade the Red Wings and Rangers thought they had completed). Wore #4 for the Red Wings.  I saw him play many times in the mid-50s and thought he was the best Defenseman in the NHL -- even better than Doug Harvey (probably not the majority opinion). Regardless, he was an all-time great!
Logged
Robb_K
Hero Member
******
Gender: Male
Posts: 4458


Hopeless Nostalgist


« Reply #2 on: May 03, 2019, 10:40:34 PM »

The great Red Kelley, who I remember as a prime defenseman for Leafs (later 1st Kings coach) passed away yesterday at age 91. By all accounts off the ice he was an absolute gentlemen and quite accomplished as well. RIP.

How could I have watched The NHL for 68 years and never have heard of that guy?Huh?  I HAVE, however, heard of Red Kelly.  HE was one of my all-time favourite players.  I wouldn't say he was better, at his best than Doug Harvey, at his best.  But they were both so good it didn't matter a lot.  But neither came close to Bobby Orr.  I remember Red from his last years with The Red Wings.  I don't blame him for not wanting to live and play in The New York Metro Area.
Logged

JoeC
Hero Member
******
Posts: 4398


« Reply #3 on: May 04, 2019, 08:03:29 AM »

The great Red Kelley, who I remember as a prime defenseman for Leafs (later 1st Kings coach) passed away yesterday at age 91. By all accounts off the ice he was an absolute gentlemen and quite accomplished as well. RIP.

How could I have watched The NHL for 68 years and never have heard of that guy?Huh?  I HAVE, however, heard of Red Kelly.  HE was one of my all-time favourite players.  I wouldn't say he was better, at his best than Doug Harvey, at his best.  But they were both so good it didn't matter a lot.  But neither came close to Bobby Orr.  I remember Red from his last years with The Red Wings.  I don't blame him for not wanting to live and play in The New York Metro Area.

Red's loss, not coming to NY. He could've lived in the all-Canadian enclave in Long Beach (on a barrier island) where many of the NYR stars lived.  And, he would've been treated like a king by the faithful at MSG. 
Logged
doctordoowop
Hero Member
******
Posts: 3854


« Reply #4 on: May 04, 2019, 01:02:52 PM »

But  he might  have  gotten in the Sawchuk  fite. Grin Grin Grin Grin
Logged
bklynmike101
Hero Member
******
Posts: 1885


« Reply #5 on: May 04, 2019, 01:26:03 PM »

I'll always remember that all so stupid Stewart-Sawchuk  fight. I found it hard to believe at the time.

All Kelly's should spell their name Kelley.  Wink 
Logged
Robb_K
Hero Member
******
Gender: Male
Posts: 4458


Hopeless Nostalgist


« Reply #6 on: May 04, 2019, 02:52:11 PM »

I'll always remember that all so stupid Stewart-Sawchuk  fight. I found it hard to believe at the time.

All Kelly's should spell their name Kelley.  Wink 

Spelled using Keltic Runes?
Logged

JoeC
Hero Member
******
Posts: 4398


« Reply #7 on: May 04, 2019, 05:06:47 PM »

I'm still mad at the Rangers for trading away Jean-Guy Gendron after the '58 season. One of my favorites in that era. Scarppy little winger who would drop his gloves at a moment's notice, despite weighing about 160 lbs soaking wet.

My favorite Rangers always seemed to be the little guys like Camille Henry, Danny Lewicki and Wally Hergesheimer. Red Sullivan as well. He was taller than those guys but skinny.

Robb, think any of those guys could play today?
Logged
Robb_K
Hero Member
******
Gender: Male
Posts: 4458


Hopeless Nostalgist


« Reply #8 on: May 04, 2019, 06:08:17 PM »

I'm still mad at the Rangers for trading away Jean-Guy Gendron after the '58 season. One of my favorites in that era. Scarppy little winger who would drop his gloves at a moment's notice, despite weighing about 160 lbs soaking wet.

My favorite Rangers always seemed to be the little guys like Camille Henry, Danny Lewicki and Wally Hergesheimer. Red Sullivan as well. He was taller than those guys but skinny.
Robb, think any of those guys could play today?

Why not?  Small players still play, if they can skate fast enough and have good enough edgework to get operating room for themselves, and they have good hockey sense. 
Logged

JoeC
Hero Member
******
Posts: 4398


« Reply #9 on: May 04, 2019, 06:35:58 PM »

I'm still mad at the Rangers for trading away Jean-Guy Gendron after the '58 season. One of my favorites in that era. Scarppy little winger who would drop his gloves at a moment's notice, despite weighing about 160 lbs soaking wet.

My favorite Rangers always seemed to be the little guys like Camille Henry, Danny Lewicki and Wally Hergesheimer. Red Sullivan as well. He was taller than those guys but skinny.
Robb, think any of those guys could play today?

Why not?  Small players still play, if they can skate fast enough and have good enough edgework to get operating room for themselves, and they have good hockey sense. 

I hear you but these guys were SMALL. Henry once weighed 138 pounds at season's end. Wally Hergesheimer went between 145-150. Lewicki about the same. I know Wally, like Bathgate, was from Winnipeg. Did you ever cross paths?

My recollections of these players were that Camille Henry was especially effective on the power play. Lewicki was an under-achiever who played no defense. Hergy was great around the net in traffic, converted many rebounds. Despite his size, he seemed to lose himself somehow around the creae. Not a physical player at all. A right-handed shot, I think he only had half a middle and half an index finger on his right hand.

Red Sullivan. What I recall most was Doug Harvey spearing him, almost to death (a priest gave him the Last Rites). It was that bad. Red still might hold the all-time AHL record for points in a season, with the Hershey Bears. Seemed like a fine gent and, even though a very good goal scorer, pretty unselfish with the puck. Lotta assists.
Logged
Robb_K
Hero Member
******
Gender: Male
Posts: 4458


Hopeless Nostalgist


« Reply #10 on: May 04, 2019, 10:27:30 PM »

I hear you but these guys were SMALL. Henry once weighed 138 pounds at season's end. Wally Hergesheimer went between 145-150. Lewicki about the same. I know Wally, like Bathgate, was from Winnipeg. Did you ever cross paths?

My recollections of these players were that Camille Henry was especially effective on the power play. Lewicki was an under-achiever who played no defense. Hergy was great around the net in traffic, converted many rebounds. Despite his size, he seemed to lose himself somehow around the creae. Not a physical player at all. A right-handed shot, I think he only had half a middle and half an index finger on his right hand.

Red Sullivan. What I recall most was Doug Harvey spearing him, almost to death (a priest gave him the Last Rites). It was that bad. Red still might hold the all-time AHL record for points in a season, with the Hershey Bears. Seemed like a fine gent and, even though a very good goal scorer, pretty unselfish with the puck. Lotta assists.

I watched ALL of those players play.  Yes, I met Andy Bathgate.  He came to my Winnipeg Rangers MJHL training camp in my last Midget year, just before I moved with my parents to Chicago.  Had I stayed in Winnipeg with my aunt and uncle, so I could pursue a hockey career, I'd have been property of The New York Rangers.  There were no free agents at that time, and the 6 NHL teams sponsored all The Junior A, AAA and Junior B teams in Canada.  I also talked to him during the pre-game warm-ups, whenever The Rangers played The Black Hawks, after we moved to Chicago (and also twice during Christmas vacation, which we often spent there). I also used to talk to Wally Hergesheimer (also from Winnipeg) both in Winnipeg, and In Chicago, when he played for The Hawks in the mid-late 1950s.  My uncle, who took us to the games, was from Winnipeg, and had played Junior hockey.  He knew both of them.  Winnipeg was like a small town.  ALL The Jews knew each other, ALL The First Nation's people knew each other, ALL The Ukes knew each other, and ALL the people in the hockey community knew each other.  My uncle was a pee wee and midget coach, which is why we had such a big backyard rink taking up both our backyard and my uncle's and aunts'.  
« Last Edit: May 04, 2019, 10:41:10 PM by Robb_K » Logged

JoeC
Hero Member
******
Posts: 4398


« Reply #11 on: May 05, 2019, 08:34:13 AM »

Robb, you were from West Kildonan, right?

Regardless, thought you might enjoy these excerpts from a VERY old Sports Illustrated profile of Andy Bathgate, "a (boy) from the Winnipeg suburb of West Kildonan on the wind-swept Manitoba plains":

- Off the ice, Bathgate is a likable and unaffected man of unusually abstemious habits. Alcohol has never touched his lips, nor tobacco smoke his lungs.

- He was no lover of schoolwork (and) did not attend school after the 10th grade.

- Apparently,every morning he and his pals walked 5 miles ("the trolley hasn't yet begun its rounds") to their goal—an indoor rink at the only time they can have it in hockey-mad Winnipeg, from 6 to 8 a.m. Leaving grudgingly at 8 they ride the trolley back to West Kildonan." Temp was often 20 below, or colder. He once recalled a -54 reading inside the unheated rink.

- In those days the Rangers trained in Winnipeg, and Bathgate snatched every opportunity to watch them practice. One day, Bryan Hextall, a Ranger star of the day, talked to him and began to cadge sticks for him. Most of them were broken, but there was "the odd good stick," and Bathgate's eyes gleam today in the remembrance.

- When first called up: "All my life I had been a goal scorer, but right then the Rangers wanted me to hang back and do a lot of checking for a line that had Wally Hergesheimer and Paul Ronty as the scorers.

- In a game last season he cracked a rising slap shot between the top goal post and the shoulder of the startled Montreal goalie, Jacques Plante, from beyond the blue line, about 75 feet away.

- One of the minor tragedies of the New York fans is that Bathgate is not at his absolute best on the small rink in Madison Square Garden. On the larger rinks on the road he has more freedom to do what comes naturally.

i never knew the MSG rink was smaller than others in the Original Six. Were they all different sizes?  Wonder if he wore #9 in tribute to Howe and Richard? Also, when he was a kid, he said that he and his pals always "shot high" because low shots "broke sticks and ankles." He still carried that bad habit into the NHL and had to consciously change that mind set.  
« Last Edit: May 05, 2019, 08:41:16 AM by JoeC » Logged
Robb_K
Hero Member
******
Gender: Male
Posts: 4458


Hopeless Nostalgist


« Reply #12 on: May 05, 2019, 11:16:58 AM »

Robb, you were from West Kildonan, right?
Regardless, thought you might enjoy these excerpts from a VERY old Sports Illustrated profile of Andy Bathgate, "a (boy) from the Winnipeg suburb of West Kildonan on the wind-swept Manitoba plains":
- One of the minor tragedies of the New York fans is that Bathgate is not at his absolute best on the small rink in Madison Square Garden. On the larger rinks on the road he has more freedom to do what comes naturally.
i never knew the MSG rink was smaller than others in the Original Six. Were they all different sizes?  Wonder if he wore #9 in tribute to Howe and Richard? Also, when he was a kid, he said that he and his pals always "shot high" because low shots "broke sticks and ankles." He still carried that bad habit into the NHL and had to consciously change that mind set.  

Yes, I'm from West Kildonan.  My sister still lives there.  That's why my uncle knew Andy.  My parents knew The Bathgates.  Andy was a very nice and soft-spoken guy.  He was a straight-shooter with a lot of integrity.  The Rangers trained in Winnipeg because they owned The Winnipeg Rangers (the team that owned my own rights).  Or was it that The New York Rangers' owners started The Winnipeg Rangers Junior A team there, BECAUSE they already had been training in Winnipeg for many years???

Yes, back in the 1940s and 1950s, the NHL rinks were NOT standard.  Boston'e and New York's were very small.  Home games were a distinct advantage, because the local team knew all the nuances and peculiarities of their rink.  Like blind people, they knew, by instinct, exactly how many strides they were from the boards at every position on the ice, without looking up or away from where they were looking (at opposing players).  They knew how the puck would bounce off the wall and the stansions.
Logged

JoeC
Hero Member
******
Posts: 4398


« Reply #13 on: May 05, 2019, 12:58:14 PM »

Yes, I'm from West Kildonan.  My sister still lives there.  That's why my uncle knew Andy.  My parents knew The Bathgates.  Andy was a very nice and soft-spoken guy.  He was a straight-shooter with a lot of integrity.  The Rangers trained in Winnipeg because they owned The Winnipeg Rangers (the team that owned my own rights).  Or was it that The New York Rangers' owners started The Winnipeg Rangers Junior A team there, BECAUSE they already had been training in Winnipeg for many years???

Yes, back in the 1940s and 1950s, the NHL rinks were NOT standard.  Boston'e and New York's were very small.  Home games were a distinct advantage, because the local team knew all the nuances and peculiarities of their rink.  Like blind people, they knew, by instinct, exactly how many strides they were from the boards at every position on the ice, without looking up or away from where they were looking (at opposing players).  They knew how the puck would bounce off the wall and the stansions.

That's interesting about the rink size.

Another thing Andy said in that old article was that he was NEVER recognized in the four American cities with NHL teams (including NYC) when he was just walking around the streets. Whereas, even though he was an "opponent," he couldn't walk a block in Toronto or Montreal without people recognizing, and speaking to, him.

Lastly, he mentions the late Bryan Hextall (All Star Ranger from the 1940s) as being kind to him with the sticks. I take it all the rest of the NHL Hextall's were his sons and grandson?
Logged
bklynmike101
Hero Member
******
Posts: 1885


« Reply #14 on: May 05, 2019, 01:53:50 PM »

I'll always remember that all so stupid Stewart-Sawchuk  fight. I found it hard to believe at the time.

All Kelly's should spell their name Kelley.  Wink 

Spelled using Keltic Runes?

Or Viking rune stones.
Logged
Robb_K
Hero Member
******
Gender: Male
Posts: 4458


Hopeless Nostalgist


« Reply #15 on: May 05, 2019, 02:22:15 PM »

Lastly, he mentions the late Bryan Hextall (All Star Ranger from the 1940s) as being kind to him with the sticks. I take it all the rest of the NHL Hextall's were his sons and grandson?

Bryan Sr. was father, grandfather, uncle, and granduncle to future Hextalls in The NHL and AHL.  The Hextalls were one of the Grand Families of Hockey, like The Conachers, Patricks, Kilreas, Manthas, Bouchards, Apps, Bouchers, Bentleys, DeMarcos, Rousseaus, etc.  

Logged

doctordoowop
Hero Member
******
Posts: 3854


« Reply #16 on: May 05, 2019, 02:51:16 PM »

Love the  word abstemious.   Those guys usually are good  students--why he quit school?  Hockey?
Logged
JoeC
Hero Member
******
Posts: 4398


« Reply #17 on: May 05, 2019, 02:59:16 PM »

Getting back to Red. Here's a hilarious "To Tell The Truth." A quiz, basically, on the NHL, Canada in general,  and Toronto.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4egSgRMHWuM
« Last Edit: May 05, 2019, 03:06:30 PM by JoeC » Logged
JoeC
Hero Member
******
Posts: 4398


« Reply #18 on: May 05, 2019, 03:07:22 PM »

Love the  word abstemious.   Those guys usually are good  students--why he quit school?  Hockey?
Sports Illustrated had some high brow writers back when they started out! And, yes, I got the opinion he knew what he wanted to do from an early age -- to play pro hockey -- and I guess he and his family believed he had the talent to make it.
« Last Edit: May 05, 2019, 03:11:07 PM by JoeC » Logged
Robb_K
Hero Member
******
Gender: Male
Posts: 4458


Hopeless Nostalgist


« Reply #19 on: May 05, 2019, 03:57:08 PM »

Love the  word abstemious.   Those guys usually are good  students--why he quit school?  Hockey?
Sports Illustrated had some high brow writers back when they started out! And, yes, I got the opinion he knew what he wanted to do from an early age -- to play pro hockey -- and I guess he and his family believed he had the talent to make it.
He HAD to choose hockey and was almost forced to succeed.  He hated academics, but didn't start learning a trade - like auto mechanics. 
Logged

Robb_K
Hero Member
******
Gender: Male
Posts: 4458


Hopeless Nostalgist


« Reply #20 on: May 05, 2019, 04:24:24 PM »

Getting back to Red. Here's a hilarious "To Tell The Truth." A quiz, basically, on the NHL, Canada in general,  and Toronto.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4egSgRMHWuM

Back then we didn't wear helmets.  So, any big hockey fan would have known Red was #1.  The least they should have done was to choose 3 athletic-looking Canadians. 
Logged

JoeC
Hero Member
******
Posts: 4398


« Reply #21 on: May 05, 2019, 07:48:43 PM »

Getting back to Red. Here's a hilarious "To Tell The Truth." A quiz, basically, on the NHL, Canada in general,  and Toronto.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4egSgRMHWuM

Back then we didn't wear helmets.  So, any big hockey fan would have known Red was #1.  The least they should have done was to choose 3 athletic-looking Canadians. 

I thought Red did a good job of disguising any Canadian accent. He wasn't called upon to say the word "out" -- which often to me is a sure "tell."

Robb, are there marked differences in accents throughout Canada? Not talking about Francophones. For example, using Red Kelly, would the fact that Red was raised on the north shore of Lake Erie, not that far from Buffalo, NY account for a less-marked Canadian accent than someone raised elsewhere in the country?
Logged
Robb_K
Hero Member
******
Gender: Male
Posts: 4458


Hopeless Nostalgist


« Reply #22 on: May 05, 2019, 11:59:11 PM »

Are there marked differences in accents throughout Canada? Would someone raised on the north shore of Lake Erie, near Buffalo, have a less-marked Canadian accent than someone raised elsewhere in the country?
Yes, there are different Canadian accents in addition to the French Canadian way of speaking in English. Newfies (Newfoundland) have the most different and difficult to understand English Canadian accent. It is a mixture of Scots (both Lowland and Highland Scottish), Irish. and England's West Country accent. The rural people there do a lot of slurring, and running words together.  When spoken fast, speakers are difficult even for Eastern Canadians to understand. Next is Nova Scotia, which was heavily settled by Scots, so it sounds more "Scottish" than the rest of Canada, ALL of which speaks with a significant Scottish influence.  New Brunswick English speakers speak more like Nova Scotians than people from Eastern Ontario.  New Brunswick Francophones have an Acadian accent (which was more based on the accent from Brittany and Western Normandy, as opposed to The French spoken in Quebec, which came more from Artois, Picardy, Eastern Normandy, and some from France's lager cities.  New Brunswick's is the same French accent of The Louisiana and Missississippi Delta Cajuns ('Acadians) who had to leave Nova Scotia in 1715, when The British took over, while only a few left New Brunswick, and some of them were repatriated during the following century.  Nova Scotia and New Brunswick were originally settled by fishermen from northwestern France.  The last Maritime Province, Prince Edward Island, speaks English with an accent somewhat between New Brunswick and Eastern rural Ontario, but also has a large Irish influence. They have heavy influence from rural southern England.  
« Last Edit: May 06, 2019, 02:35:24 AM by Robb_K » Logged

Robb_K
Hero Member
******
Gender: Male
Posts: 4458


Hopeless Nostalgist


« Reply #23 on: May 05, 2019, 11:59:48 PM »

Canadian accents - Part II
Eastern and southern Ontario speakers sound the closest to Americans in Michigan and upstate (northern and northwestern New York State).  But, they still have key differences from most Americans, that are shared to some degree by all Canadians (like the OW sound, a long A in agAINST, and a whole slew of vocabulary words that are different, such as davenport and chesterfield for couch/sofa and the like).  Northern and western Ontario sounds more old-fashioned than Toronto/Hamilton, or even Ottawa, and has less Scottish and more American influence. Metro Toronto sounds more American than anywhere except British Columbia, where they sound VERY American now (especially Vancouver)(didn't when I was a kid). Older people in Victoria, however, have a heavy posh British influence.  People in Alberta and Saskatchewan, as well as rural BCers have a straight "Western accent", while Manitobans sound "Western" to Easterners, but we have our own accent, somewhat different from the other 3 western provinces. In Vancouver, they say "out and about" almost like people in Washington and Oregon. In Manitoba, we say them as if they were spelt: "oat and aboat" (straight long O). Same for "sorry", it sounds like "soary", and "borrow", which sounds like "boar-oh"  In Ontario it's about half way between the Scots Brogue of The Maritimes, and the standard TV American, but they do have the standard tongue raising and slightly rounded mouth when pronouncing house, south, about, out, etc. In northern and central Minnesota, North Dakota and The Upper Peninsula of Michigan and northern "mainland Michigan" the accents are very similar to adjacent Manitoba and western Ontario (but there still are obvious differences from Canadian in special words).  It would me much easier to describe the differences in person or on the phone.  Here's a link to a YouTube videos that give examples of the differences:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jrTCDi3xbTw
« Last Edit: May 06, 2019, 02:40:54 AM by Robb_K » Logged

JoeC
Hero Member
******
Posts: 4398


« Reply #24 on: May 06, 2019, 08:15:12 AM »

Robb, many thanks. Love the chance to hear you expound on things Canadian. I wonder if people in the two cities of Niagara Falls, and Detroit-Windsor, speak differently. I've been to both but don't remember. Weren't all the deejays in CKLW's heyday, American?

I like a lot of Folk/Americana music which, here in the US, includes songs like "Acadian Driftwood" (many great versions), "Canadian RailroadTrilogy," etc. When I used to hang around Greenwich Village in the midst of the early 60s "folk music boom," all the coffeehouse singers did "Brave Wolfe," "Un Canadien Errant," etc. And, of course, "Four Strong Winds," which has become like a second anthem.  
,
Anyway, what's your "take" on French-English relations in the country. Wasn't there actually a failed referendum for separation in Quebec in the not so distant past?

I know you know all this history but I'm fascinated by how things apparently were in the 1920s and 1930s, i.e., the feeling among many in Quebec that the "English" were no more than "colonial oppressors." So much so that there were two Montreal hockey clubs, the Maroons (for the English) and the Canadiens for the French populace. Both teams apparently having the same owner!!

I also recall an article about how Dickie Moore and Doug Harvey (from English sections of Montreal), playing with the Beliveau's, Richard's, and Geoffrion's, were helping "unite" the city. I don't believe that Moore or Harvey spoke French (more than the basics). I also recall the later heated dispute -- along ethnic lines -- of who should be the goaltender, Ken Dryden or Bunny Larocque?

Where do things stand these days?
« Last Edit: May 06, 2019, 08:24:24 AM by JoeC » Logged
Robb_K
Hero Member
******
Gender: Male
Posts: 4458


Hopeless Nostalgist


« Reply #25 on: May 06, 2019, 06:30:42 PM »

Robb, many thanks. Love the chance to hear you expound on things Canadian. I wonder if people in the two cities of Niagara Falls, and Detroit-Windsor, speak differently. I've been to both but don't remember. Weren't all the deejays in CKLW's heyday, American?  I'm fascinated by how things apparently were in the 1920s and 1930s, i.e., the feeling among many in Quebec that the "English" were no more than "colonial oppressors." So much so that there were two Montreal hockey clubs, the Maroons (for the English) and the Canadiens for the French populace. Both teams apparently having the same owner!!

I also recall an article about how Dickie Moore and Doug Harvey (from English sections of Montreal), playing with the Beliveau's, Richard's, and Geoffrion's, were helping "unite" the city. I don't believe that Moore or Harvey spoke French (more than the basics).
Where do things stand these days?

Yes, the people on the opposites sides of the border speak a bit differently.  In general, the people in the rural areas speak a fairly close dialect, but each side has its group of special vocabulary words from his/her own country.  Farmers in upstate Michigan sound a lot like farmers in western Ontario and the Ontario peninsula.  But, lots of Americans in Detroit, came from all over USA, so, they sound very "American".  People who watch a lot of TV from the other nation can speak the patois of the opposite country when they want to, but that's not how they speak when you wake them up from a sound sleep.  Watching those language videos has taught me that Canadians, in general, speak a LOT more like Americans now, than they did in the 1940s and 1950s, and a lot more than I do.  But, then, Americans are speaking quite a bit differently from the way they did back in the 1940s and 1950s.  The local accents are all dying out, because of TV and videos.  The Manitoban example in the video I sent you sounded just the same as the Saskatchewanian and Albertan,  In my time, they sounded quite different.  The Ontario examples sounded very similar to the western Canadians  (much more than in my time).  Only The Maritimers still have a very distinct different accent from that of TV Canadian/Western Canadian and south and East Ontario.

Logged

Robb_K
Hero Member
******
Gender: Male
Posts: 4458


Hopeless Nostalgist


« Reply #26 on: May 06, 2019, 06:31:20 PM »

I also recall an article about how Dickie Moore and Doug Harvey (from English sections of Montreal), playing with the Beliveau's, Richard's, and Geoffrion's, were helping "unite" the city. I don't believe that Moore or Harvey spoke French (more than the basics).
Where do things stand these days?

Canadian/American hockey relations II-
The Maroons had different owners from those of The Canadiens for most of their history, ownership was only the same at its very end (1935-36 through 1937-38).  Doug Harvey was fluent enough in French to understand most speech.  He could make himself understood well enough.  Moore was not fluent, but could get along in a rudimentary way, when necessary.  Quebec voted to remain together with Canada.  But the vote was very close (51-49%).  Next time it could go the other way.  The problem is that if Quebec (and possibly, the French-speaking half of New Brunswick break away, Newfoundland, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island and the remainder of New Brunswick will be cut off. geographically from the rest of Canada.  I can't tell you that much about how French and English Canadians get along in The NHL nowadays.  I think they are more friendly with each other than they were before the 1960s. Did you watch the video on the link I sent you?
« Last Edit: May 06, 2019, 07:36:15 PM by Robb_K » Logged

JoeC
Hero Member
******
Posts: 4398


« Reply #27 on: May 06, 2019, 07:18:02 PM »

I did watch the video. As you said, that Maritimes accent is very distinctive. I think the Prairie accent is closest to what I would've called a "Canadian accent."

A real-life example that always strikes me as distinctly Canadian is Barry Melrose, the ESPN analyst from Kelvington, Saskatchewan. His "owts" and "abowts" and organ-i-sations are all so very Prairie.

Gotta say how impressed I was with how well Richard, Beliveau, Geoffrion, Cournoyer, etc. spoke English. Much better than the English players trying to speak French. Was that because English was mandated as Canada's official language? Did they have to learn English in school? You've gotta believe that French was the primary language spoken at home by all those Quebecois players.

« Last Edit: May 06, 2019, 07:29:17 PM by JoeC » Logged
Robb_K
Hero Member
******
Gender: Male
Posts: 4458


Hopeless Nostalgist


« Reply #28 on: May 06, 2019, 07:43:11 PM »

I did watch the video. As you said, that Maritimes accent is very distinctive. I think the Prairie accent is closest to what I would've called a "Canadian accent."

A real-life example that always strikes me as distinctly Canadian is Barry Melrose, the ESPN analyst from Kelvington, Saskatchewan. His "owts" and "abowts" and organ-i-sations are all so very Prairie.

Gotta say how impressed I was with how well Richard, Beliveau, Geoffrion, Cournoyer, etc. spoke English. Much better than the English players trying to speak French. Was that because English was mandated as Canada's official language? Did they have to learn English in school? You've gotta believe that French was the primary language spoken at home by all those Quebecois players.

English was the dominant language of North America, so, it was easier for the French  Speakers to learn it than vise versa.  No, French Canadiens attended French speaking schools with classes conducted in French.  But many families realised it would be better for their children to also speak English.  It could help them get better jobs.  I took French in school, but many of my friends in Manitoba took German or Russian as their foreign language.  It wouldn't have made much sense for French Canadiens to take Russian, German, or latin or Greek as their "foreign language" unless they wanted to be a priest.
Logged

doctordoowop
Hero Member
******
Posts: 3854


« Reply #29 on: May 06, 2019, 09:28:39 PM »

Recall Boston garden being mentioned as smaller-- not MSG.    Re CKLW---the DJs almost all  sounded identical---&  often moved to KNJ,  KFRC, WOR-FM  & the other Drake run stations.  Sometimes changed part or all  of names.
Logged
Pages: [1] 2 Go Up Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2006-2007, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.083 seconds with 18 queries.