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bklynmike101
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« Reply #30 on: September 06, 2020, 12:50:20 PM »

Funny. I think Stanton is currently projected to come back soon, and before Judge. Torres back yesterday. Last year when everyone went down, the replacements - Tauchman, Maybin, Urshela et al were amazing. This year the injuries to key guys have the Yankees in quite a falloff/tailspin.  And time is growing short. 
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doctordoowop
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« Reply #31 on: September 26, 2020, 12:23:37 PM »

Stanton-terrible-.  1 for 20--swing stinks--. Frazier is starting left fielder.  Well, at least Cole is 7-3  and looks unhitable.

Hey whay happened to Cespedes?
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bklynmike101
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« Reply #32 on: September 26, 2020, 12:36:25 PM »

Early this season, Cespedes decided to take his marbles and go home.
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doctordoowop
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« Reply #33 on: September 29, 2020, 12:16:51 AM »

A few million goes a  long way  in DR.
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bklynmike101
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« Reply #34 on: September 29, 2020, 11:07:00 AM »

Maybe he got used to getting paid for being on the injured list so didn't want to put in the work to also have to play in order to get paid. Shades of Bobby Bonilla who still cashes in annually? The Yanks also had a mid-level starter who went down shortly after singing something like a 7 year deal who sort of tried to come back over the life of the deal but never really did - Carl Pavano. looked him up and saw he did come back for a few years with some middling success but not with the Yankees.
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doctordoowop
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« Reply #35 on: October 01, 2020, 03:04:15 AM »

Wow-Stanton 2HRs. But ARod says he cant hit a curve/slider &   wondered why they thew fastballs.
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doctordoowop
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« Reply #36 on: October 09, 2020, 11:46:48 PM »

Although Stanton had a lot of HRs  in initial playoff games-a lot were off mistakes or slow  stuff. I still maintain that he has too much trouble  with  a great fast  baller who has a great curve/slider--like Glasnow of Tampa.   Many do I know but he's far  from great IMO.

And is Sanchez gone?
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bklynmike101
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« Reply #37 on: October 10, 2020, 12:10:08 AM »

Maybe Sanchez gets one more shot in spring training if there is such a thing next year. In addition to his hitting woes, helped along by his seeming unwillingness (as is the case for many others these days) to shorten up with 2 strikes, is "complemented" by impeccably poor defense, as contrasted by the ball-blocking ability of Higashioka in the 5 game Rays playoff.       
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JoeC
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« Reply #38 on: October 10, 2020, 07:17:30 AM »

NYY priority should be to re-sign DJ LeMahieu. Guy is the linchpin of their offense. For two years now. I think Sanchez, Tanaka and probably Chapman are gone. Rays payroll is $78M, Yanks is 3x that!
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bklynmike101
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« Reply #39 on: October 10, 2020, 08:23:59 AM »

Agree wholeheartedly about LeMahieu for sure. The guy is all-world, absolutely terrific in every aspect of the game.
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doctordoowop
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« Reply #40 on: October 10, 2020, 12:40:52 PM »

LeMehieu is great.  Gardner is gone too.  And Ontovino.  Sanchrz-agree one more chance-he's only  27 or so.

This year it should be a very interesting  WS--Dodgers & Rays. I pick  LA  in 6.  All games in Arlington.  Braves and Astros have to lose 1st-but they will.  All will  get a good  look  at how good LA is.  Broke  winning %  from 1909--if it matters.

Yanks willget another big $$ pitcher -Bauer wants to  come.
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bklynmike101
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« Reply #41 on: October 11, 2020, 12:34:57 PM »

Yankees' Achilles heel for a decade has been the lack of starting pitching. In 2020, Had German and Severino been available and at their peak, staff would have been strong.  Those two still have tremendous potential. Cole is a bulldog. Paxton is terrific in streaks when healthy. Tanaka, Montgomery are possibles for effectiveness.  That said, very few teams have as many as 4 let alone 5 quality starters. Im guessing that the velo norm of 95-100 has led to more frequent breakdowns compared to the days of Ford and Spahn, or even Marichal, Koufax, Palmer, Gibson, Blyleven, Sutton, etc.
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doctordoowop
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« Reply #42 on: October 11, 2020, 02:16:42 PM »

Back in the day--for example  LA with Koufax& Drysdale  would be 20  games over 500. Number 3  Osteen for awhile  6- games over.  Then just 4 & 5 starters to be at 500--then 90-95 wins & playoffs.
Agree  if Severino &   German could play Yanks could have been in WS.  Not all of Yank woes are Cashman's fault.
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bklynmike101
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« Reply #43 on: October 12, 2020, 11:36:47 AM »

Back in the 50's and 60's, maybe  a handfull of "regulars" would experience major injuries in any given season. Today, despite better training and medical care, increased speeds and size have resulted in a far greater prevalence of major injuries. For a GM, it's a "wildcard" that they can't do much about one way or the other. This tendency is even more pronounced with pitchers than position  players. As a kid, reading the backs of baseball cards, I'd be "angry" when coming upon the rare player whose stats were "no good" because he had played in less than 100 games due to a major injury. It was RARE.  Just sayin'......
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doctordoowop
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« Reply #44 on: October 13, 2020, 12:29:13 AM »

Is it the  dreaded PEDS?
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JoeC
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« Reply #45 on: October 13, 2020, 07:20:28 AM »

Back in the 50's and 60's, maybe  a handfull of "regulars" would experience major injuries in any given season. Today, despite better training and medical care, increased speeds and size have resulted in a far greater prevalence of major injuries. For a GM, it's a "wildcard" that they can't do much about one way or the other. This tendency is even more pronounced with pitchers than position  players. As a kid, reading the backs of baseball cards, I'd be "angry" when coming upon the rare player whose stats were "no good" because he had played in less than 100 games due to a major injury. It was RARE.  Just sayin'......
Good stuff, Mike. Back in the day, a starting rotation and lineup tended to go through a season remarkably unchanged. I don't doubt pitchers pitched through injury that today would call for for Tommy John Surgery (they just altered HOW they pitched), others battled through chronic knee, back and shoulder problems that today would have them sitting out.

I'm not saying the old guys were tougher; they just didn't have the same medical options available (e.g., scoping) and, more importantly, didn't want to give up their starting position to someone else (the Wally Pipp thing!). Plus, the owners didn't have to protect their investment in the player due to having multi-year, huge contract money tied up.

Stengel gets credit for bringing "platooning" to the fore but ... that was usually just only at one position. I guess Earl Weaver expanded that to maybe as many as three positions. You're certainly right in that those baseball card stats reflected a large majority of players playing loads of games (many even all 154 or 162). 
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bklynmike101
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« Reply #46 on: October 13, 2020, 10:41:06 AM »

Joe,

Maybe they didn't want to go back to their off-season jobs as full-timers. I still recall being taken aback when I learned that Roy Face was a house painter, Dusty Rhodes worked a tugboat in the East River, Carl Furillo worked construction, and so on.
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Robb_K
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« Reply #47 on: October 13, 2020, 12:11:16 PM »

Back in the 50's and 60's, maybe  a handfull of "regulars" would experience major injuries in any given season. Today, despite better training and medical care, increased speeds and size have resulted in a far greater prevalence of major injuries. For a GM, it's a "wildcard" that they can't do much about one way or the other. This tendency is even more pronounced with pitchers than position  players. As a kid, reading the backs of baseball cards, I'd be "angry" when coming upon the rare player whose stats were "no good" because he had played in less than 100 games due to a major injury. It was RARE.  Just sayin'......
Good stuff, Mike. Back in the day, a starting rotation and lineup tended to go through a season remarkably unchanged. I don't doubt pitchers pitched through injury that today would call for for Tommy John Surgery (they just altered HOW they pitched), others battled through chronic knee, back and shoulder problems that today would have them sitting out.

I'm not saying the old guys were tougher; they just didn't have the same medical options available (e.g., scoping) and, more importantly, didn't want to give up their starting position to someone else (the Wally Pipp thing!). Plus, the owners didn't have to protect their investment in the player due to having multi-year, huge contract money tied up.

Stengel gets credit for bringing "platooning" to the fore but ... that was usually just only at one position. I guess Earl Weaver expanded that to maybe as many as three positions. You're certainly right in that those baseball card stats reflected a large majority of players playing loads of games (many even all 154 or 162). 

It was even more important in The 6-team NHL, to not let team management find out you were hurt.  You could miss a few games, lose your job, and never again get even a cup of coffee in The NHL!  Many players would have the wretched 10-15 more years in The AHL, IHL, WHL, USHL, or The scourge of the minors, The EHL.  The pay was very low.  Franchises were less stable.  Teamss would spring up and fold or move at the drop of a hat.  Players had to constantly uproot their families, or hardly ever see them.  During the off season many of the players were door-to-door salesmen, selling encyclopaedias, vacuum cleaners, pots and pans (thus my uncle "Potsy"), and when their careers finished they went back to working on the farms and in the mines, or were salesmen in used car lots.  None of them got college degrees back then, and after their hockey careers were over, they had to get their first job training, because they never got any as a youth because their hockey training was so rigourous.
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JoeC
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« Reply #48 on: October 13, 2020, 01:45:14 PM »

Robb, I was a regular attendee at Long Island Ducks games from 1959-63. In '59, the Ducks were a new EHL franchise. When I attended games, John Muckler was the Player/Coach (later was Head Coach or GM with the North Stars, Oilers, Sabres, Rangers, Senators, etc.).  Gilles Villemure and Ron Howell played for those early Ducks teams. Gilles, on his way to the NHL, and Ron (Harry Howell's brother) on the way out of pro hockey.

What sticks most with me was that the Commack Arena was practically unheated (everyone could see their breath, and I mean inside!). Also, if I recall, there was nothing separating the players' benches from the fans. No glass or anything. The players had to be alert to drunken fans taking a poke at them, or throwing objects.

Mike, Think many players were clothing or car salesmen. I wonder how much actual selling they did. Or, like Joe Louis, did the owner just want them around to glad hand and chat with customers. Either way, totally foreign to now. Still, as late as the mid-70s, I recall Ken Singleton and Paul Blair (Orioles OFs) doing a paid appearance at the opening of a strip mall bank branch here in Maryland. Guess some players still will do TV ads.
 





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bklynmike101
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« Reply #49 on: October 14, 2020, 10:58:52 AM »

Joe,

Ah Commack Arena. Somewhere far far out in "exotic" Suffolk County. Once and once only, I had the pleasure (not sarcastic; it was fun) of seeing top level pro wrestling. And it was at Commack arena on a frigid night around 1967 or so. Driven there both ways by my friend's dad in his plumbing supplies van, the one vehicle owned by the two families together.  See, my friend had this older cousin, all of 17, who sat directly behind me and went so far as to smile and talk to me. Oh, what a night (apologies to Francis Castelluccio)!

PS - Ran into the great Bruno Sammartino on the way into the arena and got to shake his hand. He was so nice to everyone in person.   
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JoeC
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« Reply #50 on: October 14, 2020, 11:40:53 AM »

Mike, the Commack Arena was constructed and finished in my Junior year of High School, 1959-60. To say it was done "on the cheap" is a major understatement. Sorta like a big quonset hut that sat about 4,000.

It did fill a void, though, and it allowed us to see NBA pre-season exhibition games (I saw Wilt Chamberlain with the 76ers), the aforementioned EHL Ducks (the prime tenant), pro wrestling (as you say) and, in 1960, a Murray the K Thanksgiving Friday stage show. I remember the Del Satins opened the show, followed by Jimmy Charles, The Chimes and The Shirelles. Had to be more acts but I don't recall them.

Oh, when talking hockey at that arena, there was also no Zamboni for resurfacing the ice. They used shovels and brooms foir a quick once-over. Didn't help much! Maybe that was par for the course in minor league hockey (Zamboni's came into NHL use in 1955).
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doctordoowop
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« Reply #51 on: October 14, 2020, 09:29:30 PM »

Bizarre that the zamboni was invented  in that snowy frigid area Culver City Ca. 

My father worked  one  winter with  Cal Abrams at a Nassau county  post office!
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JoeC
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« Reply #52 on: October 15, 2020, 07:30:44 AM »

Bizarre that the zamboni was invented  in that snowy frigid area Culver City Ca.  

My father worked  one  winter with  Cal Abrams at a Nassau county  post office!
I envy your dad. I'm sure Cal didn't have a big ego and was personable (unless you brought up his getting thrown out at the plate in 1950 and costing the Dodgers a shot at a play off with the Phillies). When he retired, I think Cal owned a bar somewhere in Nassau County. BTW, Cal made the B'nai B'rith Baseball Hall of Fame.

Quick trivia: Anyone recall hearing who the Phils OF was who threw Cal out at the plate in that crucial 1950 play?
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bklynmike101
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« Reply #53 on: October 15, 2020, 10:14:58 AM »

Mike, the Commack Arena was constructed and finished in my Junior year of High School, 1959-60. To say it was done "on the cheap" is a major understatement. Sorta like a big quonset hut that sat about 4,000.

It did fill a void, though, and it allowed us to see NBA pre-season exhibition games (I saw Wilt Chamberlain with the 76ers), the aforementioned EHL Ducks (the prime tenant), pro wrestling (as you say) and, in 1960, a Murray the K Thanksgiving Friday stage show. I remember the Del Satins opened the show, followed by Jimmy Charles, The Chimes and The Shirelles. Had to be more acts but I don't recall them.

Oh, when talking hockey at that arena, there was also no Zamboni for resurfacing the ice. They used shovels and brooms foir a quick once-over. Didn't help much! Maybe that was par for the course in minor league hockey (Zamboni's came into NHL use in 1955).

I'm pretty sure that at the old MSG still had guys using shovels and brooms in-between periods in the mid-60's. Might have had Zamboni's as well during some form of transition phase. Enjoyed your short-form Commack Arena synopsis. Recall seeing Chamberlain play - was a big fan - still have a B&W pic bought at MSG I managed to cajole my dad to spring for - while still a Philadelphia Warrior circa 1960/61.
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JoeC
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« Reply #54 on: October 15, 2020, 12:01:33 PM »

Mike, I saw a lot of hockey at MSG from 1955-59. Then, my next game in person was probably not until the mid-1970s with the expansion Washington Caps. So ... the 60s aren't familiar to me in the same way.

Unlike baseball, I've only been inside three hockey arenas in my life. The old MSG, the Capital Centre outside Washington, and the Met Center in Bloomington, near the Minneapolis Airport (with the original expansion North Stars). None of the three places is still in use! I think Dino Ciccarelli is the only player I ever saw score, in person, in two different venues.

I once walked by the old Maple Leaf Gardens in Toronto (across from the hotel I was staying at) but ... never got in to see a game. My loss.
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Robb_K
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« Reply #55 on: October 15, 2020, 03:03:02 PM »

When talking hockey at that arena, there was no Zamboni for resurfacing the ice. They used shovels and brooms for a quick once-over. Didn't help much! Maybe that was par for the course in minor league hockey (Zamboni's came in '55).

Wow!  Just shovels in a professional arena! Even on our backyard rink we had an ice scraper! What they had in the old days (back in my youth) was a non-powered ice scraper/grader that had a sharp metal blade set between 2 metal pole side structures.  It was shaped something like a metal pipe ice hockey goal structure, with the blade on the bottom of the north south pushing direction, and a steel pipe framework with two pipes on the sides with a top and bottom pipe (the bottom pipe has a ski under it to slide along the ice.  The top pipe is what the skaters push.  You have one strong skater on each side, skating and pushing it, or, if you are young kids (not so strong) you can have 2 skaters on each side, pushing the scraper, and propelling it across the ice.  Naturally, the big scraping edge, can only even the ice surface where it finds it, it can't remove large bumps, so you still need Human scrapers to follow it, with shovels and brooms, to even off the bumps.  But it was a big help over most of the rink that was flat.

We had a very large backyard rink, because my uncle (a youth hockey coach), who lived next door, and my father, took out the fence between our backyards, and built foundation walls (and side boards), and the rink covered most of the 2 yards.  Back in the pre-Global Warming days, Winnipeg got usually 5 to 5.5 months of sub-freezing temperatures with almost no thaw (those would be near the beginning and end and be too short to melt the ice completely.  So, we had almost half a year of ice rink.  During very late spring and summer we'd let grass grow.  In October, we'd lay a tarp down, and water it with the hose, building up a layer at a time, for a few evenings, until it was thick enough. All the boys in our neighbourhood played there. I practised every day. We had an extended family team of brothers and cousins.
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JoeC
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« Reply #56 on: October 15, 2020, 04:23:33 PM »

Robb, Sounds like your two-backyard rink had better quality ice than this EHL "arena."

The owner of the Long Island Ducks had, I'm sure, "bought" the franchise for next to nothing and I'm sure the arena managers - badly wanting a tenant - gave him a sweetheart deal. He literally operated on a shoestring, serving as the team's owner and PA announcer. And, the very frigid indoor arena temperature I mentioned indeed seemed to be from the owner trying to save on utility bills.

What was the Eastern Hockey League (not to be confused with a Canadian league with the same name)? What purpose did it serve? The teams didn't seem to have hardly any NHL prospects or, for that matter, even older guys trying to hang on in pro hockey as long as possible. Don't recall any NHL team affiliations. I'm sure the EHL players were paid practically nothing.



« Last Edit: October 15, 2020, 04:26:04 PM by JoeC » Logged
Robb_K
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« Reply #57 on: October 15, 2020, 05:47:53 PM »

Robb, Sounds like your two-backyard rink had better quality ice than this EHL "arena."

The owner of the Long Island Ducks had, I'm sure, "bought" the franchise for next to nothing and I'm sure the arena managers - badly wanting a tenant - gave him a sweetheart deal. He literally operated on a shoestring, serving as the team's owner and PA announcer. And, the very frigid indoor arena temperature I mentioned indeed seemed to be from the owner trying to save on utility bills.

What was the Eastern Hockey League (not to be confused with a Canadian league with the same name)? What purpose did it serve? The teams didn't seem to have hardly any NHL prospects or, for that matter, even older guys trying to hang on in pro hockey as long as possible. Don't recall any NHL team affiliations. I'm sure the EHL players were paid practically nothing.

You're right that virtually no prospects, who played in The EHL, ever made The NHL. The few who did were goaltenders who had no room to play in the leagues who owned their rights.  There was ALWAYS a shortage of roster positions for all the goaltenders who were signed to teams.  The overload always had to play in one level below their talent level, to get the work they needed to progress in their experience and skill level.  The EHL was a place where young hockey players who weren't good enough to play in The AHL, CHL, WHL, or even The IHL, could  play, keep up their dream to be a professional hockey player, and thereby avoid having to take "a day job";  and it was a place for US ex-college players to continue to play, and a place for young goaltenders, who couldn't make CHL and IHL rosters, to continue getting playing time to progress in their skills, and a place for washed up Canadian players to continue to play and earn some money when they had no decent job alternatives.

I'm sure you've seen the film, "Slap Shot", starring Paul Newman.  The film was loosely based on The EHL, The Long Island Ducks, and John Brophy.  But it could have been based on almost any of The EHL's teams.  The league was turned into a version of so-called "professional wrestling".  The level of play was terribly low, and most of what the fans came to see was fights.  Any player with any talent, and potential to move up would not have wanted to play in that league.  There were amateur leagues in Canada where the playing level was twice or thrice as good.
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doctordoowop
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« Reply #58 on: October 16, 2020, 12:03:57 AM »

Been in 6 hockey arenas. Old MSG, new MSG,  Forum in Inglewood,  Staples Center, Barclay Center.
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JoeC
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« Reply #59 on: October 16, 2020, 08:16:17 AM »

Been in 6 hockey arenas. Old MSG, new MSG,  Forum in Inglewood,  Staples Center, Barclay Center.
Got me beat easy, Doc.

On my list of arenas I've seen but never been inside, I could add the Pond at Anaheim (called something else now). Glimpsed it from my hotel room balcony in Orange during a trip to Disneyland.
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