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Author Topic: Yankee Quiz  (Read 2252 times)
bklynmike101
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« on: October 29, 2020, 11:29:09 AM »

Who was the first Yankee to wear #3 after Ruth?

Meaningless (?) Hint:  At age 7, he moved from Canada to Rochester, NY when his dad decided to go there to rebuild his aunt's house (his dad's sister) after it burned down in a fire.

What, the house should have burned down in a vat of chicken soup maybe?  Cool   
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JoeC
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« Reply #1 on: October 29, 2020, 04:29:22 PM »

Tough question. For me, anyway. Gotta be a number of guys because the NYY didn't retire Babe's number for many years after he retired, right?

If anything in baseball happened before 1948, I'm pretty bad. And I only go back that far because of Ken Burns, reading biographies, and because many players of the immediate post-WWII era had careers that extended into the mid-50s.
« Last Edit: October 29, 2020, 05:39:53 PM by JoeC » Logged
bklynmike101
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« Reply #2 on: October 30, 2020, 10:36:23 AM »

Ruth's uniform # was retired as part of his "farewell" in 1948. 

More hints:

The perpetrator we are looking for was not exactly obscure as he went  on to play 9 seasons for the Yankees compiling  a lifetime batting average of a quite strong .290.  His best season, perhaps was 1939 in which he hit 21 HRs, had 101 RBI's, collected just over 100 BBs, and batted .306   

(The last player to wear # 3 for NYY was a far less successful player, 1948 rookie Cliff Mapes.
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JoeC
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« Reply #3 on: October 30, 2020, 11:22:38 AM »

Ruth's uniform # was retired as part of his "farewell" in 1948. 

More hints:

The perpetrator we are looking for was not exactly obscure as he went  on to play 9 seasons for the Yankees compiling  a lifetime batting average of a quite strong .290.  His best season, perhaps was 1939 in which he hit 21 HRs, had 101 RBI's, collected just over 100 BBs, and batted .306   

(The last player to wear # 3 for NYY was a far less successful player, 1948 rookie Cliff Mapes.
My guess would be Charlie Keller (what gives me a bit of pause is I think he had a season or two that was a cut higher than the "best season" you mention).
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bklynmike101
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« Reply #4 on: October 31, 2020, 12:04:09 PM »

Final hint (giveaway):

His nickname was Twinkletoes.
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Robb_K
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« Reply #5 on: October 31, 2020, 12:54:48 PM »

Final hint (giveaway):

His nickname was Twinkletoes.

George Selkirk!
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Robb_K
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« Reply #6 on: October 31, 2020, 01:05:59 PM »

Who was the first Yankee to wear #3 after Ruth?

Meaningless (?) Hint:  At age 7, he moved from Canada to Rochester, NY when his dad decided to go there to rebuild his aunt's house (his dad's sister) after it burned down in a fire.

What, the house should have burned down in a vat of chicken soup maybe?  Cool   

I would have got it from this hint.  I knew all the Canadian-born Major League players up to the late 1960s, when I stopped following the game.
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JoeC
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« Reply #7 on: October 31, 2020, 04:20:33 PM »

Congrats to both of you (Mike for asking the tough question and Robb for the answer). I never would have gotten it, even with the clues.

I know the name, of course, but my connection to Mr. Selkirk began when I moved to the DC area in 1966 following college. Selkirk was the GM of the expansion Washington Senators and was instrumental in two major Senators events (trading with LA for the great slugger Frank Howard, and getting Ken McMullen to hold down 3B; and, convincing Gil Hodges to become the Senators manager for four or five years in the mid-60s).
« Last Edit: October 31, 2020, 04:26:21 PM by JoeC » Logged
Robb_K
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« Reply #8 on: October 31, 2020, 05:06:04 PM »

Who was the first Yankee to wear #3 after Ruth?

Meaningless (?) Hint:  At age 7, he moved from Canada to Rochester, NY when his dad decided to go there to rebuild his aunt's house (his dad's sister) after it burned down in a fire.

What, the house should have burned down in a vat of chicken soup maybe?  Cool   

I would have got it from this hint.  I knew all the Canadian-born Major League players up to the late 1960s, when I stopped following the game. We even have a town in Manitoba named after him!   Grin
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bklynmike101
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« Reply #9 on: November 01, 2020, 12:48:59 PM »

Robb and Joe,


Great answers and Selkirk remembrances. I'm pretty sure I saw him play in old-timers games in the early 60's.
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Robb_K
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« Reply #10 on: November 01, 2020, 01:19:25 PM »

Robb and Joe,


Great answers and Selkirk remembrances. I'm pretty sure I saw him play in old-timers games in the early 60's.

He must have been ancient then.  Reminds me of seeing a few 80+ year old veterans making "token" appearances in such games.  I'm well into my 70s, but I could still run or skate and score a goal by swinging my stick, or could still swing a bat and hit the ball (probably not against a 100 mph fastball - well maybe I could foul one off).  But I wouldn't want to play in a game with checking.  That's why I stopped playing in pick-up games in my 50s, because there always was a yahoo who thought he was still in his 20s, and we were in an NHL game.   Shocked
« Last Edit: November 01, 2020, 06:37:53 PM by Robb_K » Logged

JoeC
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« Reply #11 on: November 01, 2020, 05:25:00 PM »

Anyone recall the 1982 Old Timers' Classic when Luke Appling connected for a HR off Warren Spahn? Appling was 75 at the time.
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doctordoowop
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« Reply #12 on: November 01, 2020, 07:48:59 PM »

I saw it--it took Appling 5  minutes to limp around the bases.
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bklynmike101
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« Reply #13 on: November 02, 2020, 12:02:27 PM »

Robb and Joe,


Great answers and Selkirk remembrances. I'm pretty sure I saw him play in old-timers games in the early 60's.

He must have been ancient then.  Reminds me of seeing a few 80+ year old veterans making "token" appearances in such games.  I'm well into my 70s, but I could still run or skate and score a goal by swinging my stick, or could still swing a bat and hit the ball (probably not against a 100 mph fastball - well maybe I could foul one off).  But I wouldn't want to play in a game with checking.  That's why I stopped playing in pick-up games in my 50s, because there always was a yahoo who thought he was still in his 20s, and we were in an NHL game.   Shocked

Selkirk was born in 1908, so was only just north of 50 in the early 60's, not all that old to be playing in an old-timers game. I saw many much older play in 3 consecutive Yankees old-timers games that I went to in the early 60's. My big regret - wanted to see Cobb, who was scheduled to appear, but died just a few weeks or so before the game (1961). 
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JoeC
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« Reply #14 on: November 02, 2020, 01:28:32 PM »

Mike, loved your anecdote. Cobb would've been 74 in that '61 Old Timers Game. He was a tough old bird, racist and misogynist that he apparently was.

Who liked the 90s movie, "Cobb," with Tommy Lee Jones and Robert Wuhl? It was set in 1960. Personally, I thought it was great. Will have to check my streaming services to see if I can re-watch.

I think the NYY are the only franchise in baseball that has made Old Timers Day an annual event. I wonder why? I'm not a Yankee fan but I have to admire that commitment.



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bklynmike101
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« Reply #15 on: November 03, 2020, 11:20:48 AM »

Joe,

I recall the Tommy Lee Jones Cobb movie and enjoyed it. My Cobb connection is that we share the same birthdate. Discovering this a s a kid I decided he was the greatest of all time (I've since revised my opinion). Even then, I knew he was known for being rough and tough and spiking people but had no idea about his racism and other not so endearing traits.

I've always had a certain veneration of old things - old cars, old music (hence R&B of the 50s), old athletes (dinosaurs above the age of say, 34-35). So, when I discovered old-timers games, with legends of the past that I'd read about, I really really wanted to go. Fortunately, I managed to get my dad to take me to app. 3 consecutive old-timers games '61-'63.

Most disappointing moment - learning that the old geezers played only 3 innings when I had expected the full 9. Most exhilarating moment - Joe D taking a single swing and lacing a line drive double to the deepest recesses of left-centerfield in the old Stadium. The youngster was only about 46-47 at the time.
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JoeC
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« Reply #16 on: November 03, 2020, 02:33:15 PM »

Mike, I think Joe D (age 50) hit a grand slam in the '65 Old Timers game. Think it just made it over the LF fence. That must've thrilled that crowd. I never saw one in person but they were always televised in the 60s, before the regular game. It always sold out, if I recall correctly!

I really don't think all that badly of Cobb. He was from the South and, even if he wasn't, I'd bet 90% (or more) of the guys playing in his era shared the same views. Cobb's formative years were in 19th century, rural Georgia.

« Last Edit: November 03, 2020, 02:36:52 PM by JoeC » Logged
bklynmike101
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« Reply #17 on: November 04, 2020, 12:24:42 PM »

Joe,

I think some attributed Cobb's troubles (as well as his determination to excel on the field) to having witnessed his mother shooting his father after catching him "in the act" with another woman. Or was it the other way around? Per some sources, Cobb's animus went so far as to go into the stands and strangle an African-American to death during the course of an MLB game, for which he received zero penalty. 
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Robb_K
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« Reply #18 on: December 04, 2020, 04:38:58 AM »

Mike, loved your anecdote. Cobb would've been 74 in that '61 Old Timers Game. He was a tough old bird, racist and misogynist that he apparently was.

Who liked the 90s movie, "Cobb," with Tommy Lee Jones and Robert Wuhl? It was set in 1960. Personally, I thought it was great. Will have to check my streaming services to see if I can re-watch.

I think the NYY are the only franchise in baseball that has made Old Timers Day an annual event. I wonder why? I'm not a Yankee fan but I have to admire that commitment.

My recollection of players over 50 in old-timers' games was that they were there to talk to the fans, sign ottygraphs, and, possibly throw a weak, symbolic, "First Pitch" to the catcher from 15-20 feet, and IF they played only one, token at bat,hit a weak grounder at best, and had a pinch runner thrown out at first, and not play at all in the field.  Luke Appling's feat, at his late age was an incredible surprise.  But most of the Old Timers' games I saw were when the average grandfather was dying at between 59 and 66, and most smoked like chimneys, ate terribly, drank like fish, and didn't stay in good physical condition, unlike so many today.  So it's no surprise that starting in the '60s, and moving towards today, more older retired players could play more and better.
« Last Edit: December 04, 2020, 12:22:14 PM by Robb_K » Logged

bklynmike101
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« Reply #19 on: December 04, 2020, 12:16:21 PM »

Mike, loved your anecdote. Cobb would've been 74 in that '61 Old Timers Game. He was a tough old bird, racist and misogynist that he apparently was.

Who liked the 90s movie, "Cobb," with Tommy Lee Jones and Robert Wuhl? It was set in 1960. Personally, I thought it was great. Will have to check my streaming services to see if I can re-watch.

I think the NYY are the only franchise in baseball that has made Old Timers Day an annual event. I wonder why? I'm not a Yankee fan but I have to admire that commitment.

My recollection of players over 50 in old-timers' games was that they were there to talk to the fans, sign ottygraphs, and, possibly throw a weak, symbolic, "First Pitch" to the catcher from 15-20 feet, and IF they played only one, token at bat,hit a weak grounder at best, and had a pinch runner thrown out at first, and not play at all in the field.  Luke Appling's feat, at his late age was an incredible surprise.  But most of the Old Timers' games I saw were when the average grandfather was dying at between 59 and 66, and most smoked like chimneys, ate terribly, drank like fish, and didn't stay in good physical, unlike so many today.  So it's no surprise that starting in the '60s, and moving towards today, more older retired players could play more and better.

By the time I came along - early 60's OT games - most of those that showed up to play, many of whom were past 50, were capable of jogging, fielding, lobbing the ball all the way to the plate with control, etc. I think the games were 3 inning affairs  (perhaps 2?), more or less played according to the rules, and punctuated by the antics of "umpire" Al Schacht. The format was the Yankees against all other guys usually. 
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