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JoeC
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« on: October 31, 2020, 05:34:35 PM »

Since the U.S. Election Day is near, thought this might be appropriate. Mixed bag of baseball trivia (original Senators and 1961-71 expansion team), as well as some  Capitals hockey trivia. Here goes:

Baseball

1. Left school at age 13 to work in a coal mine in PA. In his first game as a Senators infielder, was threatened with death by Ty Cobb for a hard tag. Player-Manager at age 27. Future Hall of Famer (Vets Committee inductee). Led the team to its only World Series title in the 20th Century.

2. First Manager of the expansion Washington Senators in 1961. Tall and lanky but good power. 20 year career (12 with the Senators, covering three decades as an active player). Seven time All-Star; was on the 1960 Pirates World Series winner.

3. Came to Washington from the Browns after the 1953 season in a trade for Gil Coan. Traded to the White Sox in 1960 for Earl Battey and Don Mincher. 4x All-Star with Washington. Played IF and OF.

4. Lived in Alhambra, CA and went to El Monte HS. Signed with Boston but was traded to Washington, along with Norm Zauchin, for Pete Runnels. Made his MLB debut playing for Washington in 1958. Started in CF that first season. Not a HR hitter. Left-handed thrower and batter. Later played five seasons with the Angels.

Hockey

5. First Capitals General Manager. His expansion draft selections set the new franchise back a decade, at least. Storied HoF career as a Boston Bruin. Won the Hart Trophy in 1951. Centered a famous Bruin line; other line mates were childhood friends of his from Kitchener, Ontario.

6. Player who had 136 points (still their record) in the 1981-82 season for the Caps. That included 60 goals (he once scored 66 for the London Knights in the OMJHL). Also played for the California Golden Seals and Minnesota North Stars. Played the Center position. A "little guy" with great speed. He scored 50 goals in 1980-81, and had four other seasons (two of those with the Caps) where he had 30+.

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bklynmike101
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« Reply #1 on: November 01, 2020, 12:56:28 PM »

1. Bucky Harris
2. Mickey Vernon
3. Roy Sievers
4. Albie Pearson?
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Robb_K
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« Reply #2 on: November 01, 2020, 12:59:16 PM »

Since the U.S. Election Day is near, thought this might be appropriate. Mixed bag of baseball trivia (original Senators and 1961-71 expansion team), as well as some  Capitals hockey trivia. Here goes:

Baseball

1. Left school at age 13 to work in a coal mine in PA. In his first game as a Senators infielder, was threatened with death by Ty Cobb for a hard tag. Player-Manager at age 27. Future Hall of Famer (Vets Committee inductee). Led the team to its only World Series title in the 20th Century.

2. First Manager of the expansion Washington Senators in 1961. Tall and lanky but good power. 20 year career (12 with the Senators, covering three decades as an active player). Seven time All-Star; was on the 1960 Pirates World Series winner.

3. Came to Washington from the Browns after the 1953 season in a trade for Gil Coan. Traded to the White Sox in 1960 for Earl Battey and Don Mincher. 4x All-Star with Washington. Played IF and OF.

4. Lived in Alhambra, CA and went to El Monte HS. Signed with Boston but was traded to Washington, along with Norm Zauchin, for Pete Runnels. Made his MLB debut playing for Washington in 1958. Started in CF that first season. Not a HR hitter. Left-handed thrower and batter. Later played five seasons with the Angels.

Hockey

5. First Capitals General Manager. His expansion draft selections set the new franchise back a decade, at least. Storied HoF career as a Boston Bruin. Won the Hart Trophy in 1951. Centered a famous Bruin line; other line mates were childhood friends of his from Kitchener, Ontario.

6. Player who had 136 points (still their record) in the 1981-82 season for the Caps. That included 60 goals (he once scored 66 for the London Knights in the OMJHL). Also played for the California Golden Seals and Minnesota North Stars. Played the Center position. A "little guy" with great speed. He scored 50 goals in 1980-81, and had four other seasons (two of those with the Caps) where he had 30+.    

1) Bucky Harris

2) Mickey Vernon

3) Roy Sievers

4) Albie Pearson
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Robb_K
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« Reply #3 on: November 01, 2020, 01:02:42 PM »

My terribly slow typing kills me again!!!  Even posting before looking at the hockey questions!!!!  And now, being 3 hours west of the bulk of members, usually all the questions have been answered.  Normally, I'm already sleeping when the quizzes come up. 
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Robb_K
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« Reply #4 on: November 01, 2020, 01:08:16 PM »

Since the U.S. Election Day is near, thought this might be appropriate. Mixed bag of baseball trivia (original Senators and 1961-71 expansion team), as well as some  Capitals hockey trivia. Here goes:


Hockey

5. First Capitals General Manager. His expansion draft selections set the new franchise back a decade, at least. Storied HoF career as a Boston Bruin. Won the Hart Trophy in 1951. Centered a famous Bruin line; other line mates were childhood friends of his from Kitchener, Ontario.

6. Player who had 136 points (still their record) in the 1981-82 season for the Caps. That included 60 goals (he once scored 66 for the London Knights in the OMJHL). Also played for the California Golden Seals and Minnesota North Stars. Played the Center position. A "little guy" with great speed. He scored 50 goals in 1980-81, and had four other seasons (two of those with the Caps) where he had 30+.   

5) Max McNab

6) Dennis Maruk
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JoeC
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« Reply #5 on: November 01, 2020, 06:59:16 PM »

Mike and Robb, all your baseball answers are correct.

Albie Pearson, I'm sure you recall, was short. I've seen him listed as being 5'5 and also 5'6. Freddie Patek with the Royals is consistently listed as 5'5. Two of the shortest players I ever saw, along with Bobby Shantz and Phil Rizzuto. I never saw 5'4 Wee Willie Keeler, 5'5 Rabbit Maranville, 5'6 Hack Wilson or, of course, Eddie Gaedel (all 3'7 of him).   

Robb, Dennis Maruk is correct. I'd be interested in hearing whether you think Maruk is deserving of the Hockey Hall of Fame? Had he been a member of a winning team (instead of California, Cleveland, Washington, Minn, etc), might that have put him over the top?

5. Max McNab is incorrect.

Here's another clue or two: the name of famous line that he centered in Boston would never be allowed today (much too politically incorrect). The name of the line apparently came from the ethnicity of many residents of Kitchener/Waterloo. He began his Bruins career in 1936-37 and retired as a player in 1955. His entire 16 year career was with the Bruins.
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Robb_K
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« Reply #6 on: November 02, 2020, 06:32:12 AM »

Mike and Robb, all your baseball answers are correct.

Albie Pearson, I'm sure you recall, was short. I've seen him listed as being 5'5 and also 5'6. Freddie Patek with the Royals is consistently listed as 5'5. Two of the shortest players I ever saw, along with Bobby Shantz and Phil Rizzuto. I never saw 5'4 Wee Willie Keeler, 5'5 Rabbit Maranville, 5'6 Hack Wilson or, of course, Eddie Gaedel (all 3'7 of him).   

Robb, Dennis Maruk is correct. I'd be interested in hearing whether you think Maruk is deserving of the Hockey Hall of Fame? Had he been a member of a winning team (instead of California, Cleveland, Washington, Minn, etc), might that have put him over the top?

5. Max McNab is incorrect.

Here's another clue or two: the name of famous line that he centered in Boston would never be allowed today (much too politically incorrect). The name of the line apparently came from the ethnicity of many residents of Kitchener/Waterloo. He began his Bruins career in 1936-37 and retired as a player in 1955. His entire 16 year career was with the Bruins.

5) Milt Schmidt - He was the centre on "The Kraut Line", along with Woody Dumart and Bobby Bauer.
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JoeC
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« Reply #7 on: November 02, 2020, 08:17:29 AM »

Robb, Correct! Dumart was apparently half-German. Milt Schmidt may have rebuilt the Bruins but ... a total failure as Caps GM.

Two last BASEBALL questions:

1. Walter Johnson was one of the "Five Immortals" -- the original 5 players elected to Cooperstown in its first "class" back in 1936. Who were the other four?

2. Walter Johnson and Harmon Killebrew were arguably the two greatest Washington Senators. They hailed from neighboring towns in what unlikely State?

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bklynmike101
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« Reply #8 on: November 02, 2020, 11:55:40 AM »

2. Idaho
1. Cobb-Ruth(?)-Cy Young-Mathewson?
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JoeC
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« Reply #9 on: November 02, 2020, 01:17:56 PM »

2. Idaho
1. Cobb-Ruth(?)-Cy Young-Mathewson?
1. Cobb, Ruth and Mathewson are correct. Cy Young is not right as he went into the Hall in its' second year. So ... still need one more name.

2. Idaho is right. What are the odds? I never think of Idaho as having been a great producer of baseball talent, no less having two all-time greats as native sons! I looked it up and only two more Idaho-raised MLB players stand out over time, two pretty darn good pitchers named Vern Law and Larry Jackson. So ... not a lot of quantity, but no question about the quality.
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Robb_K
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« Reply #10 on: November 02, 2020, 01:32:43 PM »

Robb, Correct! Dumart was apparently half-German. Milt Schmidt may have rebuilt the Bruins but ... a total failure as Caps GM.

Two last BASEBALL questions:

1. Walter Johnson was one of the "Five Immortals" -- the original 5 players elected to Cooperstown in its first "class" back in 1936. Who were the other four?

2. Walter Johnson and Harmon Killebrew were arguably the two greatest Washington Senators. They hailed from neighboring towns in what unlikely State?   

1)  How could you guys forget Honus (Hans) Wagner, who was often thought to be the best baseball player who ever played for over 50 years?
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JoeC
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« Reply #11 on: November 02, 2020, 01:42:23 PM »

Robb, Correct! Dumart was apparently half-German. Milt Schmidt may have rebuilt the Bruins but ... a total failure as Caps GM.

Two last BASEBALL questions:

1. Walter Johnson was one of the "Five Immortals" -- the original 5 players elected to Cooperstown in its first "class" back in 1936. Who were the other four?

2. Walter Johnson and Harmon Killebrew were arguably the two greatest Washington Senators. They hailed from neighboring towns in what unlikely State?   

1)  How could you guys forget Honus (Hans) Wagner, who was often thought to be the best baseball player who ever played for over 50 years?
Yep, Honus is the man. I guess "Honus" ("Hannes"?) comes from his given name of "Johannes." Some family members called him "Hans."
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bklynmike101
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« Reply #12 on: November 03, 2020, 11:23:22 AM »

One of Han's famed T206 baseball cards just sold for $1.4M. Sadly, I have cards of Dutch Dotterer but not Hans Wagner. Undecided
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Robb_K
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« Reply #13 on: November 03, 2020, 01:42:58 PM »

Robb, Correct! Dumart was apparently half-German. Milt Schmidt may have rebuilt the Bruins but ... a total failure as Caps GM.

Two last BASEBALL questions:

1. Walter Johnson was one of the "Five Immortals" -- the original 5 players elected to Cooperstown in its first "class" back in 1936. Who were the other four?

2. Walter Johnson and Harmon Killebrew were arguably the two greatest Washington Senators. They hailed from neighboring towns in what unlikely State?   

1)  How could you guys forget Honus (Hans) Wagner, who was often thought to be the best baseball player who ever played for over 50 years?
Yep, Honus is the man. I guess "Honus" ("Hannes"?) comes from his given name of "Johannes." Some family members called him "Hans."

I would guess that, too.  "Jan" is the main nickname that comes from Johannes.  But all names related to the name "John" are really derived from the Hebrew name Yahu or Yehu-Natan  (which turned into "Johnathan).  Not just Wagner's family called him Hans, but also many of his fans, especially in Louisville and Pittsburgh, but also league wide, and more during the earlier part of his career than the end, and after his career.
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JoeC
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« Reply #14 on: November 03, 2020, 02:26:38 PM »

Mike, thanks for the laugh today -- we need it!

Dutch Dotterer -- Ed Bailey's backup with the Reds in '59.

They had a 60 player "draft" to fill out the rosters of the two expansion clubs in '61 (the Senators and Angels). Dutch was the 24th player chosen in that draft (picked by Washington).

Top three picks for the Angels were: Eli Grba, Duke Maas and Jerry Casale. All pitchers. Top 3 (again all pitchers) by Washington were: Bobby Shantz, Dave Sisler, and Johnny Klippstein. By far, with hindsight, the best pick was made by the Angels who took Dean Chance (from Baltimore's farm system) at #51.

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bklynmike101
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« Reply #15 on: November 04, 2020, 12:19:49 PM »

Ah yes, Eli Grba, he who could not afford to buy a vowel. Glasses. Blue bottomed '60 card. Some time with my NYY. Maas had a few good years for NYY prior to his demise with the fledgling Anglels. Casale had one year in which he was something like 13-7 W-L, then promptly self-destructed (maybe injury?).

Little Bobby Shantz had a few good relief years left in him, pitching profitably until around age 40. Sisler, another bespectacled hurler, did nto have too much success in MLB although he hung around for 5-8 years, the last of the 3 MLB Sisler's.

Klippstein, also hung in there until age 40 with some late career success with Minnesota. I remember one announcer remarking how amazing it was that Klipp was still one of the few hurlers who could still burn in in "at 90 mph" despite his advanced age. 90 mph is chicken feed now.

Dean Chance had some monster years but was unable to sustain it for an extended period.

And my Mets chose the immortal Hobie Landrith as their first pick. Fire that scout!     
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doctordoowop
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« Reply #16 on: November 07, 2020, 10:24:33 PM »

No mike--as Casey  said  Landreth was picked #1 because "without a catcher u get a lot of passed balls."  One of my life time thrills was coming out of Yankee  Stadium  to see Casey in a bright  orange suit  engage arguing fans for a half hour . Amazing.

I also recall  walking outside Ebbets with my father. We walked  past Charlie Dressen.  Pop said "Hi  Chuck." Chuck answered "Hi."   I was  very impressed and  told pop--"I didn't know you knew  Dressen."   What innocence in a little boy.
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JoeC
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« Reply #17 on: November 08, 2020, 08:17:58 AM »

Doc, great personal anecdotes. If I ever walked by famous in ballplayers, I never knew it.

Dressen was another little guy (5'5 or so). Must've had something on the ball upstairs because he got the chance to manage five major league teams. A lot about him in "Boys of Summer," my favorite baseball book. 
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bklynmike101
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« Reply #18 on: November 08, 2020, 01:10:35 PM »

Doc/Joe,

Boys Of Summer probably my favorite baseball book too.

I remember that famous Casey quote about Landrith/catchers. Casey always made sense in his left-handed dentist sort of way. I recall being "angry" when the NYY fired him just after he won the AL pennant  but lost in 7 games in the '60 Series to -drat- Rocky Nelson and crew.  Grin 
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doctordoowop
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« Reply #19 on: November 08, 2020, 02:17:28 PM »

mike--I still dont know why he started Ditmar instead of Whitey in game 1
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bklynmike101
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« Reply #20 on: November 09, 2020, 01:26:05 AM »

Maybe because of the pinch hit double Art hit in the Yanks 2 out rally in their 7-6 win over the Tigers earlier in the season in the very first MLB game I went to.  Even DeMaestri got a hit that inning.
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doctordoowop
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« Reply #21 on: November 10, 2020, 11:40:48 PM »

Ditmar pinch hit?  But not quite have Whitey's  arm!
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bklynmike101
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« Reply #22 on: November 11, 2020, 01:50:16 AM »

He did indeed. It was "one of those games" with lots of strange and wonderous happenings - a fantastic MLB in-person first game ever.

As a hurler, Ditmar was decent - had a few good years - but not even close to Whitey (who started that game vs. Frank Lary, the 'Yankee killer", but both got knocked out early) who was a great one, especially when the game really mattered.
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