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Author Topic: 1963 LA Dodgers Trivia  (Read 1933 times)
JoeC
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« on: January 11, 2021, 01:16:32 PM »

Again, refers only to 1963 season!

1. Who was the regular RF (wore #25)?

2. Who was the regular 3B (wore #11)?

3. Name the Starting Pitcher in the four-man LA rotation not named Koufax, Drysdale or Podres? He wore #15 and came to LA from the Mets in a November 1962 trade.

4. He gave way to Ron Fairly in the 63 season but was LA's starting 1B in the opener. Always wore #14 (for LA and other teams he was with).
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JoeC
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« Reply #1 on: January 12, 2021, 09:41:58 AM »

I'll add a clue (or two) a day to see if that inspires any answers:

1. Also a great college basketball player.

2. Better hitter than fielder. Did not play in the 1963 World Series against the Yanks due to a late Sep injury. Traded after the 1964 season.

3. This pitcher played for 10 teams in his career (1957-74). With LA from 1963-67, primarily as a reliever. 1963 was the only season he was a regular starter (went 10-8 with a 2.89 ERA).

4. One of only 6 players in history to win back-to-back World Championships on different teams. Chicago-native who went to Purdue on a football scholarship.
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Robb_K
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« Reply #2 on: January 12, 2021, 02:35:08 PM »

Again, refers only to 1963 season!

1. Who was the regular RF (wore #25)?

2. Who was the regular 3B (wore #11)?  

3. Name the Starting Pitcher in the four-man LA rotation not named Koufax, Drysdale or Podres? He wore #15 and came to LA from the Mets in a November 1962 trade.

4. He gave way to Ron Fairly in the 63 season but was LA's starting 1B in the opener. Always wore #14 (for LA and other teams he was with).    

1) Wally Moon?

2) Ken McMullen?

3) Bob Miller?

4) Bill Skowron?
« Last Edit: January 14, 2021, 02:41:49 PM by Robb_K » Logged

JoeC
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« Reply #3 on: January 12, 2021, 05:02:09 PM »

All correct except for #1. Not Wally Moon.

I never would've remembered that Bob Miller was part of that 1963 LA rotation.

And, I'd lost track of Skowron playing with anyone after the Yanks. He ended his career - after LA - with the Senators, White Sox and Angels. Bill was a flop with LA in 1963 until the World Series where he batted .385 with a HR.
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doctordoowop
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« Reply #4 on: January 12, 2021, 05:47:39 PM »

fairly
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doctordoowop
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« Reply #5 on: January 12, 2021, 05:54:59 PM »

Willie Crawford
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JoeC
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« Reply #6 on: January 12, 2021, 06:06:44 PM »

Doc, no to Fairly and Crawford. If I recall correctly, I think you said you met the player I'm looking for at one of those camps you attended.
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Robb_K
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« Reply #7 on: January 12, 2021, 07:03:50 PM »

All correct except for #1. Not Wally Moon.

I never would've remembered that Bob Miller was part of that 1963 LA rotation.

And, I'd lost track of Skowron playing with anyone after the Yanks. He ended his career - after LA - with the Senators, White Sox and Angels. Bill was a flop with LA in 1963 until the World Series where he batted .385 with a HR.
There was a big buzz about Skowron coming to The Dodgers in 1963.  They thought he'd still have a lot left, and could be a solid regular.  He proved that he DID, having 3 good quality solid years with The White Sox from 1964-66.
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Robb_K
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« Reply #8 on: January 13, 2021, 12:16:42 AM »

All correct except for #1. Not Wally Moon.

I never would've remembered that Bob Miller was part of that 1963 LA rotation.

And, I'd lost track of Skowron playing with anyone after the Yanks. He ended his career - after LA - with the Senators, White Sox and Angels. Bill was a flop with LA in 1963 until the World Series where he batted .385 with a HR.
Well, Willie Davis was the CF, and, as I remember, Tommy Davis was the LF.  So, the only possibility left is Frank Howard.  I guess that The Dodgers had a 4-man OF rotation that year, because Moon still played a lot of games for them in '63.  I guess Tommy Davis bounced around in all 3 positions, when one of the others was out.

Skowron had 3 VERY solid years as a fairly high-quality regular 1B with my White Sox from mid 1964-66, after Roy Sievers had a late career rejuvenation with them.  They had a revolving door of first basemen for much of my youth, grabbing established players from other organisations (Eddie Robinson, Ferris Fain, Walt Dropo, Earl Torgeson, Ray Boone, Ted Kluzewski, and Then Sievers, Joe Cunningham, and finally, Skowron. 

They needed to hire a scout who specialised in 1st Basemen.  They had a similar problem at 3B.  The reason The Yankees dominated Baseball for so long was because not only did they have much more money than any other team to throw at greatly talented young players, but they also had so much more money to hire the best scouts and minor league managers and coaches to develop those players.  The Cubs and White Sox could compete with The New York teams (and even outdo them between 1876 and 1920.  But, after Babe Ruth started bringing in tonnes of money to The Yanks in 1920, the writing was on the wall.
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doctordoowop
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« Reply #9 on: January 13, 2021, 02:36:21 AM »

Right Robb--Frank Howard--he was #  25.Good memory Joe-He was a gian,t but very modest and unassuming. Signed autograph  "ROY   1960,"as I recall.But I donot recall  himat all in rigiht field.

Traded for Osteen. Crawford  was  LA kid--never did much.  Athough big--no power. I saw  him  in later 60s. Last I  heard he was homeless.What about MLB pension?
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JoeC
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« Reply #10 on: January 13, 2021, 08:42:31 AM »

Yep, Frank Howard.

And you're right, Robb, in terms of platooning. Frank started the majority of games in RF.
« Last Edit: January 13, 2021, 08:48:58 AM by JoeC » Logged
Robb_K
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« Reply #11 on: January 13, 2021, 02:18:45 PM »

Right Robb--Frank Howard--he was #  25.Good memory Joe-He was a gian,t but very modest and unassuming. Signed autograph  "ROY   1960,"as I recall.But I donot recall  himat all in rigiht field.

Traded for Osteen. Crawford  was  LA kid--never did much.  Athough big--no power. I saw  him  in later 60s. Last I  heard he was homeless.What about MLB pension?

Maybe Crawford didn't play enough major league games to qualify for the Major League Pension?  Maybe to be vested, a player needs to play the equivalent of 5 full seasons (5X162=810 games?) Did Willie Crawford play that many games?
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JoeC
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« Reply #12 on: January 13, 2021, 02:29:37 PM »

Robb, I've mentioned I was a Sox fan for the Nellie Fox years. My favorite player.

Frank Lane was a master trader but ... other than Aparicio, do you recall being excited about any Sox rookies coming up to the club in the mid to late 50s? Only ones I recall were John Callison and Floyd Robinson. Neither flashed much with the White Sox.  Conversely, every year the NYY were debuting one or more future big stars from their deep farm system.
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Robb_K
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« Reply #13 on: January 13, 2021, 04:48:09 PM »

I looked up Willie Crawford's record (because it was long past my time as a baseball fan, and saw that he played over 10 full seasons' worth of Major League games.  So, he certainly would have qualified for a decent-sized MLB pension.  But, as far as I've seen, based on the so-called cost-of-living raises, which ALWAYS are far below the REAL cost of living increase to individuals, very few pensions even remotely keep up with real inflation over 20 years of retirement.  THAT's one reason why I'm still working at age 74, even though I'm receiving some retirement money from 3 different countries.
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doctordoowop
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« Reply #14 on: January 13, 2021, 10:16:03 PM »

Thanx Robb. But as  a professional  in mental health, homelessness   is not an economic problem--most home less or at ast at least half-, are victims  of menta   illness/substance abuse.
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Robb_K
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« Reply #15 on: January 14, 2021, 02:47:25 PM »

Robb, I've mentioned I was a Sox fan for the Nellie Fox years. My favorite player.

Frank Lane was a master trader but ... other than Aparicio, do you recall being excited about any Sox rookies coming up to the club in the mid to late 50s? Only ones I recall were John Callison and Floyd Robinson. Neither flashed much with the White Sox.  Conversely, every year the NYY were debuting one or more future big stars from their deep farm system.

No!  Callison was really the only one.  Earl Battey, too.  They gave up on both too early.  But, they really didn't have a scouting system or minor league player development system to compete even remotely with The Yankees.  Really, only The Cardinals and Dodgers did (both because Branch Rickey set up their systems).  The Sox weren't really any worse at development than Cleveland or Detroit, or Boston.  But, they were miles below The Yanks.
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JoeC
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« Reply #16 on: January 14, 2021, 04:37:02 PM »

Robb, I've mentioned I was a Sox fan for the Nellie Fox years. My favorite player.

Frank Lane was a master trader but ... other than Aparicio, do you recall being excited about any Sox rookies coming up to the club in the mid to late 50s? Only ones I recall were John Callison and Floyd Robinson. Neither flashed much with the White Sox.  Conversely, every year the NYY were debuting one or more future big stars from their deep farm system.

No!  Callison was really the only one.  Earl Battey, too.  They gave up on both too early.  But, they really didn't have a scouting system or minor league player development system to compete even remotely with The Yankees.  Really, only The Cardinals and Dodgers did (both because Branch Rickey set up their systems).  The Sox weren't really any worse at development than Cleveland or Detroit, or Boston.  But, they were miles below The Yanks.
I hear you. With the Yanks HUGE money advantage, I guess I'm surprised they lost the pennant to Cleveland in '54 and the Sox in '59.  

By year, notable 1950s rookies joining the NYY:

1950 - Whitey Ford
1951 - Mickey Mantle, Billy Martin
1952 - Andy Carey
1954 - Bob Grim, Bill Skowron
1955 - John Blanchard, Elston Howard, Johnny Kucks, Bobby Richardson, Tom Sturdivant
1956 - Norm Siebern, Ralph Terry
1957 - Tony Kubek

Notable White Sox rookies of the 1950s:

1950 - Jim Busby, Chico Carrasquel
1956 - Luis Aparicio, Bill Fischer
1957 - Jim Landis, Barry Latman
1958 - John Callison, Norm Cash, John Romano
1959 - Gary Peters

And, you can add Norm Cash to Earl Battey and Callison as future star players they gave away.
 
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