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Author Topic: Cincinnati Reds/Houston Colt 45 Trivia  (Read 4937 times)
doctordoowop
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« Reply #30 on: February 05, 2021, 10:26:43 PM »

Bob Cain was pitcher to Gaedel.   mike-think WINS only did Giant games for 1 year. I remember the McCovey game-wasnt his rookie yr 1959?.

The last out was Don Taussig.  Who the hell would know that?
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Robb_K
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« Reply #31 on: February 06, 2021, 12:35:02 PM »

Bob Cain was pitcher to Gaedel.   mike-think WINS only did Giant games for 1 year. I remember the McCovey game-wasnt his rookie yr 1959?.

The last out was Don Taussig.  Who the hell would know that?
Yes, 1959 was McCovey's rookie year.  Bob "Sugar" Cain, was a "control" pitcher, who couldn't get the ball over the plate.  Just like Jim Delsing, he was not long after traded to The Browns, and even went with them to Baltimore.  He couldn't throw a strike to Walt Dropo.  Imagine him trying to locate Gaedel's strike zone!   Cheesy

« Last Edit: February 08, 2021, 01:26:50 AM by Robb_K » Logged

doctordoowop
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« Reply #32 on: February 08, 2021, 11:08:41 PM »

Great  ??  is 1st HR in Dodger Stadium?   Ans- Wally Post
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Robb_K
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« Reply #33 on: February 08, 2021, 11:47:22 PM »

Great  ??  is 1st HR in Dodger Stadium?   Ans- Wally Post

When was this question asked?  And what was the entire question?  It doesn't seem to make sense as it is.

Wally Post, of The Reds, hit the first HR hit in L.A.'s Dodger Stadium in 1962?
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doctordoowop
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« Reply #34 on: February 09, 2021, 02:15:23 AM »

Rite now -asked & answered by me-but Post is a good Reds  trivia?
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JoeC
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« Reply #35 on: February 09, 2021, 08:01:01 AM »

Rite now -asked & answered by me-but Post is a good Reds  trivia?
Wally Post, Gus Bell and Jim Greengrass -- that's a powerful OF trio. Could any of them play the position though? I don't remember. Just the hitting.
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bklynmike101
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« Reply #36 on: February 09, 2021, 12:32:01 PM »

Greengrass done before my time but well remember Post - my type of player - good power, decent bat - and Bell, original scion of the baseball Bell dynasty. Unfortunately for me, by the time Gus came to my Mets, although not chronologically all that old, his performance declined precipitously.  Sad 
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Robb_K
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« Reply #37 on: February 09, 2021, 12:40:49 PM »

Rite now -asked & answered by me-but Post is a good Reds  trivia?
Wally Post, Gus Bell and Jim Greengrass -- that's a powerful OF trio. Could any of them play the position though? I don't remember. Just the hitting.
None of the three were standout fielders.  Post was not fast at all.  His arm was average.  Bell had good speed when he was young with Pittsburgh, and maybe his first year or two with the Reds. Otherwise, he had average speed.  He had the best arm of the three.  Greengrass was average at his peak.  I would say that Bell was the best of the three.
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doctordoowop
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« Reply #38 on: February 09, 2021, 01:29:09 PM »

Rite Robb.Bell played CF, others would be DH now. Gus is Buddy's dad no?
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Robb_K
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« Reply #39 on: February 09, 2021, 03:04:34 PM »

Rite Robb.Bell played CF, others would be DH now. Gus is Buddy's dad no?
Yes.
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JoeC
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« Reply #40 on: February 09, 2021, 05:43:03 PM »

My memory says the 1956 Reds broke the existing record for HRs hit in a season by a team (221).   Who held the record up until then? I don't have the answer here so I may guess myself (assuming my assumption about the record-breaking is even correct)!

Regardless, that '56 Reds team had five players with 28 or more HRs. Can you name the five and put those names to these 1956 individual HR numbers?  

38  LF
36  RF
35
29
28 - C
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Robb_K
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« Reply #41 on: February 09, 2021, 08:32:53 PM »

My memory says the 1956 Reds broke the existing record for HRs hit in a season by a team (221).   Who held the record up until then? I don't have the answer here so I may guess myself (assuming my assumption about the record-breaking is even correct)!

Regardless, that '56 Reds team had five players with 28 or more HRs. Can you name the five and put those names to these 1956 individual HR numbers?  

38  LF
36  RF
35
29
28 - C
1956 is right in the middle of my wheelhouse (I had ALL the Baseball cards from 1952-1963.) and like many collectors, I have a photographic memory (especially for numbers on lists).  I can remember almost all of the stats of all teams' regulars, and, if somehow I forget, because some positions had a gaggle of part-timers, I can remember the card picture side, then turn it over in my mind, and scan the card in my mind, and keep looking at the columns until I find the right one, and then read the answer.

But, I know ALL these answers off the top of my head.  I wonder if I should give others a chance, first?  I'll wait a bit (just like I do at the dinner table, so others will have a chance to eat something.
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bklynmike101
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« Reply #42 on: February 10, 2021, 01:42:47 AM »

38-Frank Robinson
35- Big Klu?
28-Ed Bailey
Gus Bell or Wally Post on the list?
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JoeC
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« Reply #43 on: February 10, 2021, 07:40:05 AM »

Mike, Post and Bell are the other two. I was a bit surprised by which one had 36.
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bklynmike101
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« Reply #44 on: February 10, 2021, 12:19:13 PM »

If Felix Mantilla could hit 30 (Fenway I think), then Wally Post could hit 36.

Though I can't claim a photographic memory of any sort a la Robb, his comment does bring to mind my memory of Don Buddin's '61 Topps card, the ack of which clearly stated he had hit 66 HRs in his 1060 season. I was infuriated at the time. Don Buddin? "Everyone" knew he was but a light hitting SS. 9 year olds can be very unforgiving.  Grin

 
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JoeC
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« Reply #45 on: February 10, 2021, 12:23:58 PM »

If Felix Mantilla could hit 30 (Fenway I think), then Wally Post could hit 36.

Though I can't claim a photographic memory of any sort a la Robb, his comment does bring to mind my memory of Don Buddin's '61 Topps card, the ack of which clearly stated he had hit 66 HRs in his 1060 season. I was infuriated at the time. Don Buddin? "Everyone" knew he was but a light hitting SS. 9 year olds can be very unforgiving.  Grin

 
Actually Post hit 210 in his 15 yr career while Bell hit 206. So ... knowing that now, I'm not sure why I considered Bell the superior power hitter.
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Robb_K
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« Reply #46 on: February 10, 2021, 12:53:23 PM »

Good job.  I knew that most of us would know ALL of these, because 1956 was well into the heydey of our young fandom.  1950-53 would be tougher, because some of us were too young then to pay top-level attention to stats and full memory of entire card series.
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bklynmike101
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« Reply #47 on: February 11, 2021, 12:07:42 PM »

1956 was well before my time but I like to go backwards  Grin

I did the same thing with music.

First "discovered" baseball in '59 and would claim '59-'63 or so as my sweet spot.
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Robb_K
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« Reply #48 on: February 11, 2021, 02:32:55 PM »

If Felix Mantilla could hit 30 (Fenway I think), then Wally Post could hit 36.

Though I can't claim a photographic memory of any sort a la Robb, his comment does bring to mind my memory of Don Buddin's '61 Topps card, the ack of which clearly stated he had hit 66 HRs in his 1060 season. I was infuriated at the time. Don Buddin? "Everyone" knew he was but a light hitting SS. 9 year olds can be very unforgiving.  Grin

 
Actually Post hit 210 in his 15 yr career while Bell hit 206. So ... knowing that now, I'm not sure why I considered Bell the superior power hitter.

Wally Post was mainly a HR hitter.  He hit 40 in 1955.  He had almost 3 times as many career SO as BB.  He had only a .266 lifetime BA, never hit many doubles and triples and was a worse than average outfielder.  However, due to his many HRs (one in every 19 AB), he had a high career Slugging Avg, of .485. 

Gus Bell, on the other hand, was a high calibre ALL-Around player, having a high (for his time) .280s lifetime average, and hit over .290 six times, and hit a lot of doubles and triples, and was a fast runner, with good field coverage, had a better arm, was a better base runner, received almost as many walks as strikeouts. He hit almost as many HRs as Post, but in 50% MORE AB, and his Slugging Avg, (still good for his time) of .445, was lower than Posts. 

But, I would take Bell for my team over Post, every time. However, BOTH benefited greatly from playing in tiny Crosley Field for most of their careers, and so, they are far below super power hitters and all-around players like Williams, Musial, Mays, Mantle, Aaron and Robinson.
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JoeC
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« Reply #49 on: February 11, 2021, 05:12:33 PM »

In my (mistaken) mind's eye, I was thinking Gus was a much bigger guy than Wally. Turns out they were both a solid 6'1, 190.

Post was traded to the Phillies in 1957 for Harvey Haddix. Wally's leaving opened the door for Jerry Lynch to become a regular OF in 1958; then, in '59, the Reds moved F Robby to 1B, to create an OF opening for Vada Pinson.

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bklynmike101
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« Reply #50 on: February 11, 2021, 06:47:32 PM »

Pinson had this odd habit of having a great season followed by an ordinary season followed by a great season for quite a while. In my view, strangely undervalued relative to his numbers. Rico Carty another one.
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JoeC
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« Reply #51 on: February 11, 2021, 07:57:40 PM »

Pinson had this odd habit of having a great season followed by an ordinary season followed by a great season for quite a while. In my view, strangely undervalued relative to his numbers. Rico Carty another one.
Another undervalued hitter to me was Wes Covington of the Milwaukee Braves. I saw the Braves play the NY Giants a half-dozen times at the Polo Grounds in the mid-50s. Every game I attended, Wes hit the heck out of the ball. Saw him have a two-HR game twice (with long drives into the RF stands). A pretty good defensive OF too. Overshadowed by all the Braves stars.
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doctordoowop
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« Reply #52 on: February 11, 2021, 11:22:41 PM »

A different team but Kent Hadley-1B  had  a great swing.
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Robb_K
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« Reply #53 on: February 12, 2021, 01:05:14 AM »

Pinson had this odd habit of having a great season followed by an ordinary season followed by a great season for quite a while. In my view, strangely undervalued relative to his numbers. Rico Carty another one.
Another undervalued hitter to me was Wes Covington of the Milwaukee Braves. I saw the Braves play the NY Giants a half-dozen times at the Polo Grounds in the mid-50s. Every game I attended, Wes hit the heck out of the ball. Saw him have a two-HR game twice (with long drives into the RF stands). A pretty good defensive OF too. Overshadowed by all the Braves stars.

Yes, Wes had a beautiful swing!  Not as compact as Aaron's (mostly wrist flick), but very efficient.  I wonder if he got some tips from Hank?  Lee Maye had a nice, natural swing too.  I wonder if Aaron doubled as a hitting (batting) coach?  Carty also had a great eye and a great natural swing.  He's one guy who didn't need any help from Aaron.  He was probably the best natural hitter I ever saw play.  He was probably born with that talent, whereas, Williams and Musial got that way through hard and persistent work.
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JoeC
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« Reply #54 on: February 12, 2021, 02:34:00 PM »

Covington and Aaron both broke into pro ball with Eau Claire in 1952. Long-time friends.
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doctordoowop
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« Reply #55 on: February 13, 2021, 03:17:34 AM »

Robb-agree about Carty- played with him In Dominican--I guess he was in his mid 60s & still    every swing hit a bullet line drive .
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bklynmike101
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« Reply #56 on: February 13, 2021, 01:33:43 PM »

Covington seemed to usually be used in a platoon role. Lefty? Yup. I'd bet his splits were far better against RHP than LHP. He had some crazy looking stats for a few seasons in the early part of his career - late 50's.

Kent Hadley?  He may have had a nice looking swing but I thought of him as a poor hitter and so hated when Moose Skowron's back acted up and was replaced by Hadley.
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JoeC
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« Reply #57 on: February 13, 2021, 04:05:02 PM »

Covington seemed to usually be used in a platoon role. Lefty? Yup. I'd bet his splits were far better against RHP than LHP. He had some crazy looking stats for a few seasons in the early part of his career - late 50's.

Kent Hadley?  He may have had a nice looking swing but I thought of him as a poor hitter and so hated when Moose Skowron's back acted up and was replaced by Hadley.
You're right about Covington in a platoon role. He never had more than 380 ABs in any of his prime years, many times in 280-320 range. He killed right-handed pitching.
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