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JoeC
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« on: June 15, 2021, 07:51:45 PM »

1. What piece of California real estate did future owner Phil Wrigley purchase in 1919?

2. Cub double play combo that broke the previous team record held by Tinker and Evers?

3. What Cubs manager called Cubs starter Ken Holtzman a "gutless Jew?"

4. What three Cubs starters combined to make 123 starts in 1969 (they completed 53 of them)?

5. Name the five Cub position players who started between 151-162 games in '69?

6. Which Cubs Catcher often was seen - and posed for pictures - with Al Capone?

7. Who was responsible for first planting the ivy on the walls at Wrigley in 1937?

8. What year were light towers going to be erected at Wrigley for night baseball (obviously didn't happen as planned)?

9. In 1961, the Cubs had the "College of Coaches" which involved rotating a different Manager in every fourth game. Can you name any of these Cubs "Coaches/Managers?"

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Robb_K
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« Reply #1 on: June 15, 2021, 11:40:42 PM »

1. What piece of California real estate did future owner Phil Wrigley purchase in 1919?

2. Cub double play combo that broke the previous team record held by Tinker and Evers?

3. What Cubs manager called Cubs starter Ken Holtzman a "gutless Jew?"

4. What three Cubs starters combined to make 123 starts in 1969 (they completed 53 of them)?

5. Name the five Cub position players who started between 151-162 games in '69?

6. Which Cubs Catcher often was seen - and posed for pictures - with Al Capone?

7. Who was responsible for first planting the ivy on the walls at Wrigley in 1937?

8. What year were light towers going to be erected at Wrigley for night baseball (obviously didn't happen as planned)?

9. In 1961, the Cubs had the "College of Coaches" which involved rotating a different Manager in every fourth game. Can you name any of these Cubs "Coaches/Managers?"    

This was MY team - so it's a bit unfair, but the same as when you New Yorkers pick The Yankees  Thanks for having no questions dealing with post 1970 seasons!  In Fairness- I probably should wait, and give others a chance.  But this place has been dead, and I have nothing to do right now.... So.......

1) Either Catalina Island, or the land on 36th St. Where L.A.'s Wrigley Field was built.  I'll use psychology here, and guess Catalina Island, because buying an island as large as some countries is big news, and  buying a much smaller piece of land for building a ballpark is fairly mundane.
2)Glenn Beckert and Don Kessinger?
3)Only Leo Durocher could have had the nerve to say that!
4)Fergie Jenkins, Kenny Holtzman, and Bill Hands
5)Hundly, Banks, Beckert, Kessinger, Santo, and Williams
6) Gabby Hartnett
7) It was planted under Bill Veek's ownership in the late 1930s (1937 or 1938?), When I was a little kid, everyone said that it was because The Cubs' outfielder, who kept running into the brick wall - Lou Novikoff - The "Mad" Russian kept getting concussions
Cool World War II stopped that plan.  So, I'll guess 1942
9)Elvin Tappe, Harry Kraft, Lou Klein and 1 or 2 more I can't remember
« Last Edit: June 16, 2021, 11:46:28 AM by Robb_K » Logged

doctordoowop
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« Reply #2 on: June 16, 2021, 03:22:06 AM »

not looking at robb answers

1-santacatalina
baker-banks
3-leo
4-jenkins
5-banks
6-
7-boy scouts
8-1968
cavaretta
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JoeC
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« Reply #3 on: June 16, 2021, 07:40:13 AM »

1. Catalina is the correct answer. Doc, you get extra points for giving the island's full name.

2. Beckert and Kessinger.

3. Leo is right. He took no part of the blame for the 1969 collapse to the Mets for the NL pennant (although the Cubs players/pitchers were clearly overused down the stretch).

4. Jenkins, Holtzman and Hands -- pitched about 900 innings combined I think in 69.

5. The guys Robb answered minus Beckert (he only played in about 130 games in 69). The other five were real workhorses.

6. Hartnett was a favorite of Capone's although hardly the only Cub befriended by Al.

7. Veeck

8. 1941 is the year. The steel for the light towers had already been ordered but WWII priority meant it went to the war effort.

9. Elvin Tappe, Harry Craft, Lou Klein, and a guy I never heard of named Vedie Himsl. I think this system may have lasted 2 seasons. Wrigley wanted to prove Managers weren't that important.
« Last Edit: June 16, 2021, 11:19:40 AM by JoeC » Logged
bklynmike101
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« Reply #4 on: June 16, 2021, 10:45:04 AM »

Late to the party but I got a few of them before looking at the other responses and without thinking too hard: 1, 2, and 3. 1/3 of 4. 3/5 of 5. 6, approximately correct with 8, and 1/4 of 9 (Tappe, who was still active as a player for a brief time around then.
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Robb_K
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« Reply #5 on: June 16, 2021, 11:52:00 AM »

1. Catalina is the correct answer. Doc, you get extra points for giving the island's full name.

2. Beckert and Kessinger.

3. Leo is right. He took no part of the blame for the 1969 collapse to the Mets for the NL pennant (although the Cubs players/pitchers were clearly overused down the stretch).

4. Jenkins, Holtzman and Hands -- pitched about 900 innings combined I think in 69.

5. The guys Robb answered minus Beckert (he only played in about 130 games in 69). The other five were real workhorses.

6. Hartnett was a favorite of Capone's although hardly the only Cub befriended by Al.

7. Veeck

8. 1941 is the year. The steel for the light towers had already been ordered but WWII priority meant it went to the war effort.

9. Elvin Tappe, Harry Craft, Lou Klein, and a guy I never heard of named Vedie Himsl. I think this system may have lasted 2 seasons. Wrigley wanted to prove Managers weren't that important.

It lasted about a year and a half, as I recall, and the last in the rotation was made the "permanent, temporary" manager for the rest of the season, with a permanent manager to be selected the next season, after they decided the rotating system wouldn't work.  Tappe was still playing backup catcher even that year.

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JoeC
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« Reply #6 on: June 16, 2021, 12:40:49 PM »

I had a few El Tappe baseball cards. A lifetime .207 hitter.
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bklynmike101
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« Reply #7 on: June 16, 2021, 05:43:17 PM »

"Great" Cubs that come readily to mind from my first baseball cards includes the likes of Seth Morehead, Bob Anderson, Bob Rush, Ed Bouchee, Dale Long, Elvin Tappe, Irv Noren & Walt Moryn, Cuno Barragon (a bit later), Gene Baker, Art Schroll, Art Ceccarelli, Dick Drott, Glen Hobbie, Sammy Taylor, and Moe Drabowsky. 
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Robb_K
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« Reply #8 on: June 16, 2021, 05:52:44 PM »

I had a few El Tappe baseball cards. A lifetime .207 hitter.
Tappe wasn't born to be a Major League Baseball player, but to be a coach, because of his "people skills".  On skills, alone, he was marginal on his very best day.  He could have been an AAA (AA or IL, or PCL) all-time great.

On the other hand, Lou Novikoff, who I mentioned above, had a long PCL career as a star, and a very short MLB career with The Cubs, but, in my estimation, he should been in The Major Leagues significantly more, while Tappe was lucky to be there at all.
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Robb_K
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« Reply #9 on: June 16, 2021, 05:58:53 PM »

"Great" Cubs that come readily to mind from my first baseball cards includes the likes of Seth Morehead, Bob Anderson, Bob Rush, Ed Bouchee, Dale Long, Elvin Tappe, Irv Noren & Walt Moryn, Cuno Barragon (a bit later), Gene Baker, Art Schroll, Art Ceccarelli, Dick Drott, Glen Hobbie, Sammy Taylor, and Moe Drabowsky. 

I can't imagine what your definition of "Great" is in this case, whether facetious or serious.  Many of those players were average, a few were not very good for Major Leaguers.  Afew were obscure, the rest reasonably well known by the fans of their time.  Otherwise, I can't imagine why you put only these Cubs in the same grouping.
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JoeC
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« Reply #10 on: June 16, 2021, 07:21:26 PM »

I had a few El Tappe baseball cards. A lifetime .207 hitter.
Tappe wasn't born to be a Major League Baseball player, but to be a coach, because of his "people skills".  On skills, alone, he was marginal on his very best day.  He could have been an AAA (AA or IL, or PCL) all-time great.

On the other hand, Lou Novikoff, who I mentioned above, had a long PCL career as a star, and a very short MLB career with The Cubs, but, in my estimation, he should been in The Major Leagues significantly more, while Tappe was lucky to be there at all.
As now, being a catcher gave you a step up in terms pf making/staying in MLB. Also when Tappe was playing, there were only 16 teams so ... the chances of sticking were far fewer. 51 games was the most El ever played in during his ML career. 

Still, there were a load of "very marginal" catchers back in the 50s ... like Charlie Silvera, Joe Pignatano, and Ray Katt (just to use the NY teams of the 50s as an example). 
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doctordoowop
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« Reply #11 on: June 17, 2021, 03:25:50 AM »

Dont forget Ken Hubbs-RIP plane crash

And Jim Qualls who broke up Seavers no hitter in 1969.
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Robb_K
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« Reply #12 on: June 17, 2021, 11:12:06 AM »

Aside from his weak hitting, Tappe didn't have much of an arm.  So, all he had to offer was that he was good with pitchers.  Which is why he could be effective as a pitching coach.
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bklynmike101
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« Reply #13 on: June 17, 2021, 11:40:59 AM »

"Great" Cubs that come readily to mind from my first baseball cards includes the likes of Seth Morehead, Bob Anderson, Bob Rush, Ed Bouchee, Dale Long, Elvin Tappe, Irv Noren & Walt Moryn, Cuno Barragon (a bit later), Gene Baker, Art Schroll, Art Ceccarelli, Dick Drott, Glen Hobbie, Sammy Taylor, and Moe Drabowsky. 

I can't imagine what your definition of "Great" is in this case, whether facetious or serious.  Many of those players were average, a few were not very good for Major Leaguers.  Afew were obscure, the rest reasonably well known by the fans of their time.  Otherwise, I can't imagine why you put only these Cubs in the same grouping.

Oh dear. Facetious to be sure. Some truly obscure, some merely obscure by my definition - we've debated this before - i.e. only known to die-hard fans/selected locals. In any event, all names conjured up from my youth - all largely forgotten except by the likes of us. I've always had a hankering for these types - from the Bob Boyd's and Bob Nieman's (excellent hitters but nonetheless "obscure" to most) to the Zack Monroe's and Paul Giel's - now we're talking obscure by even the narrowest definition. Similar careers are being carved out to this day, albeit my appreciation of same (newbies) just ain't what it used to be. Still, I get a kick when looking up a current player recalled to MLB only to discover that he's 34 years old, and has had cups of coffee with 3-5 teams over the past 5-10 years, some of which I can recall after being prompted by his stat records.   
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doctordoowop
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« Reply #14 on: June 17, 2021, 02:27:19 PM »

A little more  trivia. What  Hollywood Movie mentioned Dee  Fondy?
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JoeC
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« Reply #15 on: June 17, 2021, 04:36:16 PM »

A little more  trivia. What  Hollywood Movie mentioned Dee  Fondy?
I'm all over this one, Doc. The movie was "Rainman" with Dustin Hoffman and Tom Cruise. Kluszewski mentioned too.

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Robb_K
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« Reply #16 on: June 17, 2021, 05:25:43 PM »

"Great" Cubs that come readily to mind from my first baseball cards includes the likes of Seth Morehead, Bob Anderson, Bob Rush, Ed Bouchee, Dale Long, Elvin Tappe, Irv Noren & Walt Moryn, Cuno Barragon (a bit later), Gene Baker, Art Schroll, Art Ceccarelli, Dick Drott, Glen Hobbie, Sammy Taylor, and Moe Drabowsky. 

I can't imagine what your definition of "Great" is in this case, whether facetious or serious.  Many of those players were average, a few were not very good for Major Leaguers.  Afew were obscure, the rest reasonably well known by the fans of their time.  Otherwise, I can't imagine why you put only these Cubs in the same grouping.

Oh dear. Facetious to be sure. Some truly obscure, some merely obscure by my definition - we've debated this before - i.e. only known to die-hard fans/selected locals. In any event, all names conjured up from my youth - all largely forgotten except by the likes of us. I've always had a hankering for these types - from the Bob Boyd's and Bob Nieman's (excellent hitters but nonetheless "obscure" to most) to the Zack Monroe's and Paul Giel's - now we're talking obscure by even the narrowest definition. Similar careers are being carved out to this day, albeit my appreciation of same (newbies) just ain't what it used to be. Still, I get a kick when looking up a current player recalled to MLB only to discover that he's 34 years old, and has had cups of coffee with 3-5 teams over the past 5-10 years, some of which I can recall after being prompted by his stat records.   

Naturally, most people today have no idea who Ed Bouchee, Walt Moryn, Bob Rush, Dale Long, Gene Baker, Irv Noren, and Sammy Taylor were.  Probably more than half The American residents, today couldn't tell you the name of one single CURRENT MLB player.  I can't!  But, in the 1950s, Baseball, indeed, WAS, The National pastime.  The list above were far from obscure in Chicago homes during the 1950s.  Yes, the others on your list were obscure, even when they played (or sat on the bench).  MY definition of obscure is hardly known even at their most popular or time of most exposure.  To kids today, even Babe Ruth and Ty Cobb are obscure (unheard of).  Naturally to us many things and people that were well-known and popular in the 1890s are obscure and even totally unknown.

Bob Rush was The Cubs' Ace for several years. Dale long set an MLB HR record.  Ed Bouchee was a colourful, controversial character.  

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JoeC
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« Reply #17 on: June 17, 2021, 06:53:24 PM »

Ah, yes. The days of two eight team leagues and no free agency made knowing teams' rosters and players' stats so easy compared to what was to come. It's amazing to me how long the old status quo lasted. Shocking that money didn't really enter the picture so much earlier.

It was really Lou Perini's move of his Boston Braves to Milwaukee that put the bee in other owners' bonnets (like O'Malley) about the fortunes that could be made if there was no regard for certain fan bases in over-saturated cities. Expansion was a natural follow-on, followed by free agency.
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doctordoowop
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« Reply #18 on: June 18, 2021, 01:52:35 AM »

right joe-also with george crowe
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bklynmike101
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« Reply #19 on: June 18, 2021, 11:59:02 AM »

I can't imagine what your definition of "Great" is in this case, whether facetious or serious.  Many of those players were average, a few were not very good for Major Leaguers.  Afew were obscure, the rest reasonably well known by the fans of their time.  Otherwise, I can't imagine why you put only these Cubs in the same grouping.
[/quote]

Oh dear. Facetious to be sure. Some truly obscure, some merely obscure by my definition - we've debated this before - i.e. only known to die-hard fans/selected locals. In any event, all names conjured up from my youth - all largely forgotten except by the likes of us. I've always had a hankering for these types - from the Bob Boyd's and Bob Nieman's (excellent hitters but nonetheless "obscure" to most) to the Zack Monroe's and Paul Giel's - now we're talking obscure by even the narrowest definition. Similar careers are being carved out to this day, albeit my appreciation of same (newbies) just ain't what it used to be. Still, I get a kick when looking up a current player recalled to MLB only to discover that he's 34 years old, and has had cups of coffee with 3-5 teams over the past 5-10 years, some of which I can recall after being prompted by his stat records.   [/quote]

Naturally, most people today have no idea who Ed Bouchee, Walt Moryn, Bob Rush, Dale Long, Gene Baker, Irv Noren, and Sammy Taylor were.  Probably more than half The American residents, today couldn't tell you the name of one single CURRENT MLB player.  I can't!  But, in the 1950s, Baseball, indeed, WAS, The National pastime.  The list above were far from obscure in Chicago homes during the 1950s.  Yes, the others on your list were obscure, even when they played (or sat on the bench).  MY definition of obscure is hardly known even at their most popular or time of most exposure.  To kids today, even Babe Ruth and Ty Cobb are obscure (unheard of).  Naturally to us many things and people that were well-known and popular in the 1890s are obscure and even totally unknown.

Bob Rush was The Cubs' Ace for several years. Dale long set an MLB HR record.  Ed Bouchee was a colourful, controversial character.  


[/quote]

Fully agree with your post but there are nuances. Recently had a visit from an old friend last seen in '67. He's a typical baseball fan - follows to a certain extent, roots for the home team, remembers much but not all of the players and teams from the late 50's to early/mid '60s. Certainly knows Ruth and Cobb. And Banks, Santo, Jenkins, B. Williams , Hubbs, Kessinger, Beckert, et al. Bouchee from his brief tour with us in NY. Long, Taylor, Moryn, Noren not so much.  In that sense, to the "average" but not deeply steeped baseball fan, I consider these others to be obscure, albeit not at the level of Ralph Lumenti, Don Taussig, or even Lee Walls, who wasn't too bad for a bit.  Smiley  
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Robb_K
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« Reply #20 on: June 18, 2021, 12:29:42 PM »

Quote
Some truly obscure, some merely obscure by my definition-In any event, all names conjured up from my youth - all largely forgotten except by the likes of us[/b]  

The list above were far from obscure in Chicago homes during the 1950s.  Yes, the others on your list were obscure, even when they played (or sat on the bench).  MY definition of obscure is hardly known even at their most popular or time of most exposure. To kids today, even Babe Ruth and Ty Cobb are obscure (unheard of). Bob Rush was The Cubs' Ace for several years. Dale long set an MLB HR record.  Ed Bouchee was a colourful, controversial character.  

Recently had a visit from a typical baseball fan -roots for the home team, remembers much but not all of the players and teams from the late 50's to early/mid '60s. Certainly knows Ruth and Cobb. And Banks, Santo, Jenkins, B. Williams , Hubbs, Kessinger, Beckert, et al. Bouchee from his brief tour with us in NY. Long, Taylor, Moryn, Noren not so much.  In that sense, to the "average" but not deeply steeped baseball fan, I consider these others to be obscure, albeit not at the level of Ralph Lumenti, Don Taussig, or even Lee Walls, who wasn't too bad for a bit.  Smiley   [/quote]

Sorry, but Lee Walls is NOT obscure to most baseball fans of the 1950s.  Only the senile would have forgotten him.  A baseball fan, who was following the standings, and going to his team's games ,an collecting baseball cards might not remember a player like Cuno Baragon, but he'd remember Lee Walls, just about as much as Dale Long.  Players who played their position as a regular for several years on whatever team, should be remembered by a former fan who was following a team in that league.  I'll admit that he memory of part-time players who only had a cup of coffee in the majors would soon be forgotten.  I haven't followed baseball since the late 1960s (other than following Hank Aaron's run to pass Babe Ruth).  Yet, I will never forget Carl Sawatski, or Bill Sarni, or Art Ceccareli, or Bobo Newsome, or Rance Pless, at least until I'm so senile I can't remember my own name, nor recognise my own family members.  Of course, I also had baseball cards to re-enforce my experience of reading about those players in newspaper articles and box scores, and watching them play at the ballpark, and later in life, on TV.  Without the visual aid of the cards, I'd have forgotten players like Baragon - but, I'd still remember Lee Walls and Dee Fondy, and "Hurricane" Bob Hazle, and even Herb Plews, had we never had cards.
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bklynmike101
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« Reply #21 on: June 19, 2021, 12:21:10 PM »

Robb, Ah yes, Herb Plews, Norm Zauchin, Jose Valdivielso, Chuck Stobbs, (early) Ted Abernathy, Dick Hyde, Clint Bulldog Courtney, Julio Bequer, and maybe Steve Korcheck as a throw in.  Great names one and all.  Grin
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doctordoowop
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« Reply #22 on: June 22, 2021, 01:29:18 AM »

NONE matches Bob Shepard-but I liked Pat Pieper.  And Jack Brickhouse.  [Isnt there a song named afrer him?]
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